Author Topic: Hit a Spiritual Wall  (Read 3151 times)

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Offline Agabus

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #45 on: April 17, 2017, 12:38:36 PM »
Threads like this makes me so happy that I belong to a community made up 80 % by converts.

I'm currently part of a community that is 80 percent immigrants, and the whole cultural baggage thing isn't a thing. The longer I'm Orthodox, the more the myth of the monolithic experience within 'X' archdiocese crumbles.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2017, 12:39:31 PM by Agabus »
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Offline ErmyCath

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #46 on: April 18, 2017, 07:43:11 AM »
I think that the demonic might be attacking you to divert you from your upcoming marriage in the church in October. Hold fast.
"You must have an opinion on everything and loudly confront everyone with it." - Cyrillic

Offline christiane777

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2017, 08:40:02 PM »
Attempting to extract myself from this faith has caused a great deal of trouble domestically, with my future with my fiance now uncertain. The priest in question has also further behaved inappropriately and stoked these tensions.

Things have become so bad for myself and her that I only wish I could go back a year and never gotten involved with these people.

I used to credit God for putting me in touch with a community of Orthodox in a very unlikely scenario decades after I had first expressed interest in the faith. "God really will show you a path if you are willing..." I said to my fiance in a conversation on our newfound church community.

However, Satan is a deceiver and appears as an angel of light, leading people astray on what seems like the right path before destroying them. And I now know that is what brought me here.


Just friendly feedback...that seems a bit over the top.

You aren't the first North American / Canadian / European to get completely sick and tired of Russians (name your Old Country culture here) and their culture.   You are part of the solution to that problem, your very presence and also letting people know that everyone doesn't have to speak Russian, everyone doesn't want to speak Russian.   Even the Russians had someone show up and alphabetize their language and put the Liturgy and so forth into their native tongue so they could become Christianized.

Having had, and continue to have, my own struggles and disappointments in a primarily English speaking parish, it seems part of the process is learning to bear with others as we pray for God to bear with us.  We asked to follow Christ after all. 

It's pretty easy to be disappointed then build up a host of other points of contention to justify our anger and disenchantment.

Here is one remedy one person found for the Russian overload syndrome, which may or may not help:  Rather than completely quit, church hop until you find a parish you like and where you are spiritually fed because you can understand what is being chanted and said.   

There are probably other solutions that don't require walking away from everything. 

I'm glad you shared and hope you are able to work this out within yourself so you can find peace and continue with your fiance.  Kali Anastasi

You raise an interesting point.  I recently attended a few Orthodox services (I am thinking about joining, but don't know yet).  One was in Slavonic, basically all Russian immigrant.  I did not know what the heck was going on.  I was possibly the only non-Russian in the building.  A few people were actually kind of nice though so it wasn't that uncomfortable.  And the choir and Church were fantastic.  Major Russian theme though.  Then I went to an English speaking service, different place.  (I am trying to see if I can find a place to go)  It was so American I couldn't believe it.  Mostly converts that I can see.  (not sure; I have not gone enough yet)  It had kind of a Protestant convert vibe, I think, just as a first impression (my imagination?  maybe).  I felt more comfortable in the 'American' English speaking one obviously but in some ways I liked the other one better, felt more 'real.'   I have not decided what to do about it.  I think it is important to have realistic expectations.  I might just go to both (am trying other options too) for awhile - see how it unfolds.  There is no perfect Church or parish.  I think of it as a job interview - they check me out - I check them out.  Has to be a mutual fit.  And expect to be uncomfortable, annoyed, frustrated in any Church up to a point:  we are not in the next world yet, we are all sinners, fall short, blah blah blah.  I don't think being ignored is always necessarily a bad thing.  And if I knew the service do I care if it is in Slavonic? (I wonder though is the homily in English - I was only there for vespers) But I don't like feeling unwelcome, people staring at you like you are something the cat dragged in.  (not saying that happened; I am saying that is my deepest fear)  I want an Eastern Orthodox Church, the real thing; I guess I do see it as 'Russian' or 'Greek.'  American seems a bit weird to me.  The cultural/ethnic identity of a particular branch of Orthodoxy is a legitimate vehicle for the truth of Christ to emerge from; I don't feel like that should be aggressively undermined in the name of some quest for universality - American-ness in a nutshell.  Western-ness maybe.  My larger point as to converts to Orthodoxy:  beware of Greeks (make that Westerners) bearing gifts.   ;)  You'll never know what hit you by the time we're done with you.
I was in the spirit on the Lords day, and heard behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet,

Offline Sinful Hypocrite

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #48 on: April 21, 2017, 08:58:20 PM »
Threads like this makes me so happy that I belong to a community made up 80 % by converts.

Are you saying that you only love those you agree with?

And that they make you happy?

◄ Psalm 53:3 ►

Everyone has turned away, all have become corrupt; there is no one who does good, not even one.
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Only God is good, seek God when you seek good, because converts and those people we agree with will lead us astray.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 08:59:34 PM by Sinful Hypocrite »
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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #49 on: April 21, 2017, 09:24:56 PM »
So where is Saxon at nowadays?
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Offline Velsigne

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #50 on: April 22, 2017, 11:19:18 AM »
I don't know, but hope he is feeling better from his disappointment with human failings.

Offline pasadi97

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #51 on: April 29, 2017, 11:21:13 AM »
Orthodoxy is for life. Comming into orthodoxy is comming into the true church and leaving it is a great sin.

What questions do you have?
God the Father is great. God the Father is good.

Offline OrthoDisco

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #52 on: Yesterday at 05:45:59 PM »
I hope you are doing OK. I pray you won't leave the church.

I used to be a evangelical protestant. I understand much of what you say when you refer to nagging voices of doubts. Our previous programming is very strong & rooted in fear - fear of hell and damnation for things that even just looked roman catholic, let alone orthodox. It shouldn't be unusual to deal with these nagging issues for many years, especially if you've spent half your life in them. As well, many of these topics need to be put into our own paradigms so that we can fully understand the benefit of, for example, something like fasting. Reading about it and accepting it intellectually is one thing. Believing its REAL and spiritually beneficial I think has to be experienced. So we pray, Lord help my unbelief, and sometimes thats all we can do. I sometimes think it would have been better to have been an atheist coming into Orthodoxy, rather than a protestant.

I currently attend a small church where ~95 percent of us are converts. We seem very protestant at times, and we're not super strict in the same way that a rocor parish might be. Sometimes its discouraging, But we try. That's all some of us are able to do, especially coming from some hard core protestant programming. Ive even had experience in liturgy when all the crossing seems too "empty ritual", so I don't cross myself unless I feel really compelled. No one says anything to me. In that light, perhaps your parish is not a good fit for you.

Something that helps me is reading about other people's experiences in Orthodoxy. Others' stories and experiences can be very helpful if I don't have my own. Reading too many books like Fr Seraphim Rose and perhaps even Met Ware can be overwhelming and seem... like crazy talk. (Remember, I still fight the protestant mind.) These heavy spiritual and educational books should best be nibbled by some of us, and not gobbled up.  But reading/watching other people experience the faith helps give me different understanding, insight, new life, etc.

Oh I wrote more than I wanted, but I hope it might help a little. Im probably not a very good example of an Orthodox Christian, but one day I would like to be. May God help me and you.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:00:09 PM by OrthoDisco »

Offline Agabus

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #53 on: Yesterday at 11:40:48 PM »
His last post, which was fairly recent, indicated he's at least still attending church with his fiancee.
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THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Offline hecma925

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Re: Hit a Spiritual Wall
« Reply #54 on: Today at 06:30:27 AM »
We seem very protestant at times,

What does that mean?
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