OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 28, 2014, 04:52:44 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What is involved in conversion?  (Read 1299 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
retzev
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Inquirer
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 20


WWW
« on: July 28, 2006, 09:24:14 PM »

I have been a protestant most of my life, but have been reading about the Orthodox Church over the last year or so and am convinced she is truly the right-believing/right-worshipping church founded by Christ and the apostles, and I wish to convert.

I'm an over-the-road trucker and I am only home for a few days per month. I've visited my local cathedral a couple of times, once for Pascha and once to visit the bookstore, but haven't yet spoken with any clergy.

I am anxious to join the Orthodox Church. Can anyone describe to me how the process of conversion works?

Logged
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2006, 09:37:44 PM »

The first step is to make contact with a clergyman of your choice. This may be a Bishop, Priest or Deacon. They will guide you as to the process which may differ slightly from juristiction to juristiction, but basically it begins with being accepted into the Catechumenate during which you receive instruction and guidance. Then, when it is determined that you are ready, you will be received into the Church either by Baptism or Chrisimation or both (depending on your circumstances and the decision of the Bishop), and be permitted to recieve Communion as a full member of the Church. The first step, however, is always to make contact with an Orthodox clergyman.
I can see that it may be difficult when you are travelling so much, but be comforted by the fact that the Catechumens are prayed for at every liturgy in every Orthodox Church throughout the world! I'd still go for a parish close to home if I were you, but if there is a town or city where you spend more time than home and which has an Orthodox Church, that may be a better choice.
You're in my prayers.
George
« Last Edit: July 28, 2006, 09:38:50 PM by ozgeorge » Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
retzev
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Inquirer
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 20


WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2006, 09:53:24 PM »

...be comforted by the fact that the Catechumens are prayed for at every liturgy in every Orthodox Church throughout the world!

Thanks, George, that is good news!

How is it determined that a Catechumen is ready? Knowledge of doctrine, history? The bearing of good fruit?

Logged
GiC
Resident Atheist
Site Supporter
Merarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Mathematician
Posts: 9,490



« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2006, 09:56:19 PM »

Thanks, George, that is good news!

How is it determined that a Catechumen is ready? Knowledge of doctrine, history? The bearing of good fruit?

Depends on the priest or bishop, but is generally related more to spiritual maturity than knowledge.
Logged

"The liberties of people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." -- Patrick Henry
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2006, 10:16:45 PM »

Like GiC said, it tends to be more based on Spiritual maturity.
Communion with the Church is the most intimate form of interaction any human being can undertake. In Communion, we are united not only to Christ, but also to one another in a bond which is stronger than even blood ties or marriage. For this reason, the Bishop is responsible to ensure that those who are admitted to Communion will not betray Christ or His Body, the Church, later (as Judas did). Thus, before Communing, we pray:
"At Thy Mystical Supper, O Son of God, accept me today as a Communicant; for I will not speak of Thy Mysteries to Thine enemies, neither will I give Thee a kiss as did Judas; but like the Theif I will confess Thee: 'Remember me o Lord in Thy Kingdom.'"
Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
retzev
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Inquirer
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 20


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2006, 10:28:29 PM »

Thank You, George and GiC, and...

"At Thy Mystical Supper, O Son of God, accept me today as a Communicant; for I will not speak of Thy Mysteries to Thine enemies, neither will I give Thee a kiss as did Judas; but like the Theif I will confess Thee: 'Remember me o Lord in Thy Kingdom.'"

...pardon my slang, but...wow...that's heavy  Smiley

« Last Edit: July 28, 2006, 10:29:18 PM by retzev » Logged
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2006, 10:50:57 PM »

Over the road trucker? No problem. You've obviously have internet ability. I spent many years traveling the NE, SE and Mid-west 3 out of four weeks a month. You might be surprised at where you'll find Orthodox parishes in which to worship. I always pre-planned these before setting out.

http://www.orthodoxyinamerica.com  might help.

Of course you do need to follow the advice above.
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
calligraphqueen
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: GOA
Posts: 341


« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2006, 11:06:43 PM »

even the quote mentioned varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, at least in mild grammatical ways.  We are pretty recent converts as well, but I noticed that it takes varying amounts of time and it's up to the clergy working with you.
If I were you I would pick a church that uses mainly English, so you don't have another tongue to trip over at the same time.  Not that this Irishwoman minds Greek at all now-but with you being in and out of town it would just be another thing to contend with.

Blessings to you in this journey!
Rebecca
Logged
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.051 seconds with 34 queries.