OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 30, 2014, 06:32:44 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Western Rite Communion  (Read 3206 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
zebu
Mot à ta mère!
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 338

aimovoroi tourkoi!


« on: May 16, 2006, 06:52:27 PM »

This weekend I am going to be in another city for my cousin's wedding, and in this city there are two Orthodox churches: a Greek church and a Western Rite Antiochian church.  It looks like I'll probably have to go to the Western Rite one, since I think I will have to walk there and it is only 2 miles from where we are staying, as opposed to 4 and a half.  What I am wondering is this:  How do you receive communion in a Western Rite Orthodox Church? Do they use a chalice and spoon like in the rest of the Orthodox Church or is it like in the Episcopal  Church where you kneel and they put a wafer in your hands and you drink from a chalice or they dip the host in the chalice and put it in your mouth for you? Or is it like the Roman Catholic Church where you receive communion standing and oftentimes they don't give you the blood?  Also do Western Rite parishes normally have confession before Divine Liturgy(or mass, as this parish calls it)?  What are the requirements for receiving communion in a Western Rite Orthodox Church? 
Logged

Жизнь прожить не поле перейти
SeanMc
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 203


« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2006, 07:02:23 PM »

Quote
To receive the sacrament, all Orthodox must be properly prepared. However, the method of giving and receiving communion differs between East and West.

At Eastern Rite parishes, the priest stands with the chalice, and the people approach one by one. In Western Rite parishes, the people are stationery, and the priest moves from person to person. Churches often have a rail around the altar, where the people kneel down and say their final pre-communion prayers. Some people may continue to kneel while receiving the sacrament.

The leavened bread—baked into a thin round wafer—is given first, followed by the wine. To receive the bread, form your hands into a cup, one on top of the other, and hold them out for the priest to place the wafer in. This manner of receiving communion was described by St. Cyril of Jerusalem in his 4th century work On the Eucharistic Rite: Make thy left hand as if a throne for thy right, which is on the eve of receiving the King. And having hollowed thy palm, receive the Body of Christ… Other ancient sources prescribe this same method. For example, Canon CI from the Quinisext Council (692) states that …if anyone wishes to be a participator of the immaculate Body in the time of the Synaxis, and to offer himself for the communion, let him draw near, arranging his hands in the form of a cross… St. John of Damascus in De Fide Orthodoxa urges us to …draw near to it with an ardent desire, and with our hands held in the form of the cross, let us receive the body of the Crucified One.

Alternatively, you may open your mouth and the priest will place the wafer inside.

To receive the wine, lightly grasp the chalice in the priest's hands and guide it to take a sip. You may notice that after each communicant the priest or deacon cleans the lip of the chalice with a white linen cloth.

http://www.westernorthodox.com/customs

Hope this helps!
Logged
Starlight
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of USA (Ecumenical Patriarchate)
Posts: 1,537


« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2006, 08:02:39 PM »

Yes, that site is a great source. Zebu, from my experience with Western Orthodox, they are very understanding that some visitors could have little to no previous experience of exposure to their customs and traditions.  I also had the same kind of questions, when I went to visit a Western Orthodox parish a couple years ago. I even did not know how I should cross myself there. As a result, the experience gave a lot of joy. You will like it!
Logged
Fr. David
The Poster Formerly Known as "Pedro"
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA, Diocese of the South
Posts: 2,828



WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2006, 10:20:55 PM »

St. Peter's in Ft. Worth has the custom of placing the wafer on your tongue, then giving you the blood directly from the chalice.

Enjoy the experience with your WR brothers and sisters, zebu!
Logged

Priest in the Orthodox Church in America - ordained on March 18, 2012

Oh Taste and See (my defunct blog)

From Protestant to Orthodox (my conversion story)
Aristibule
Your Weaker Brother
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 515


Xeno


« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2006, 05:29:07 PM »

Just to clarify - one will see some variation in Western Rite Orthodox practice. To begin with, one is only likely to see the spoon with children and the infirm (as have been long standing Western practice.) All Western Rite Orthodox use leavened bread. In the AWRV it tends to be wafer shaped, from Charis breads in TN (who make leavened wafers just for AWRV parishes.) In ROCOR Western Rite one will see small round loaves marked with a cross like seen in some Anglican traditions, and pre-Schism (as prescribed by the Council of Braga or Braganza - one of the two, I'll have to look at my notes; requiring it to be round, leavened, whole, white fine wheat flour, and fresh.) One might receive in intinction in some places (of wafer or particle being dipped in the chalice), or receive the host or particle on the tongue and then the chalice, or even as one does in Byzantine St. James - receive the wafer or particle in the hand, then receive from the chalice (no problem, since the hands of an Orthodox Christian are anointed at chrismation!) Communion is received kneeling in some places, standing in others - nothing wildly different than Eastern brethren have in the totality of their own traditions - the only exception being far less use of the spoon (after the Ecumenical Council which has the canon that reads that 'instruments of silver or gold' are not to be used to commune the faithful.) At one time after the schism, some Westerners had adopted something along those lines - a sort of tube or pipe - now only a thing seen in books and museums. Otherwise, the only other thing I could add is that various Western Rite clergy have preferences about certain methods above - with varying degrees of insistence (very similar to Byzantine clergy.) The important point is that all is done reverently, for a very good reason - and within precedent and canonically for Church tradition.

The same goes for kneeling or crossing oneself - there is also some variation (the old Celtic/Sarum method is more like the Eastern, the same English tradition also has no kneeling genuflection, but slight and profound bows.) In which case, the old Byzantine proverb about not taking one's typikon with them when visiting another monastery applies - I've communed in both (including St. Peter's), and can agree that the priests are friendly and will instruct gently (or, all the priests I know personally.)
Logged

"We must begin at once to "build again the tabernacle which is fallen down, and to build again the ruins thereof, and to set it up;" for HE WHO GAVE THE THOUGHT IN OUR HEART HE LAID ALSO THE RESPONSIBILITY ON US THAT THIS THOUGHT SHOULD NOT REMAIN BARREN." - J.J. Overbeck, 1866
Kaminetz
Member
***
Offline Offline

Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 124


« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2006, 01:06:42 AM »

I even did not know how I should cross myself there.

Interesting question. The article that was linked to describes the manner of the gesture (left to right, like the RC's do it) but it fails to say if the fingers are folded into three and two like the Eastern Orthodox, or is it an extended five fingers like the RC's?
Logged
Fr. David
The Poster Formerly Known as "Pedro"
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA, Diocese of the South
Posts: 2,828



WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2006, 01:53:59 AM »

I've seen left-to-right, and I've seen right-to-left.  I've seen three fingers, I've seen two fingers, and I've even seen a pinky (!) used by individuals in WR practice.  There's no real standard practice, so just do it the way you're comfortable doing it, is what I'd say.
Logged

Priest in the Orthodox Church in America - ordained on March 18, 2012

Oh Taste and See (my defunct blog)

From Protestant to Orthodox (my conversion story)
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.051 seconds with 34 queries.