OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 25, 2014, 03:16:43 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Reccomended Monasteries?  (Read 3804 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« on: May 10, 2006, 11:09:29 AM »

This summer, I'm planning on visiting a monastery for a few days- maybe more and I was wondering which one to go to.

Of course, St. Anthony's is always reccomended. I've never been there. I hear its very beautiful but that it has a certain element of rigidity that might not be so relaxing....just what I've heard from a friends.

I've been to Zodohos Pigi-Life Giving Springs (for nuns) in California and that is really nice too- very byzantine style. Holy Trinity in Michigan is also quite unique in that it has a  very log-cabinish feel to it.

Does anyone reccomend any good (preferrably male) monasteries to go for a visit?

I've done my research in terms of where monasteries are located but I don't have much experience in this.

God bless,
                  Timos
Logged
monkvasyl
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: UOC 0f USA
Posts: 653



« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2006, 11:57:35 AM »

I have a fondness for Holy Trinity, Jordanville, NY, and New Skete, Cambridge, NY.  And of course St. Tikhon's, South Cannan, PA.  St. John, Hiram, Ohio is also another good monastery to visit.  St. John's is OCA, but follows the Athonite practice.
Logged

The unworthy hierodeacon, Vasyl
pensateomnia
Bibliophylax
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Posts: 2,356


metron ariston


« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2006, 12:21:47 PM »

Have you ever been to any of these monasteries, and is cost/length of travel an issue?

Since you're in Canada, I would reccommend Holy Trinity in Smiths Creek or St. Nektarios in New York, since they aren't too far away. I personally prefer Holy Trinity, since, as a male guest, it is easy to fit into the tight community of monks after a day or two.
Logged

But for I am a man not textueel I wol noght telle of textes neuer a deel. (Chaucer, The Manciple's Tale, 1.131)
Νεκτάριος
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 5,437



« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2006, 12:25:49 PM »

Quote
Of course, St. Anthony's is always reccomended. I've never been there. I hear its very beautiful but that it has a certain element of rigidity that might not be so relaxing....just what I've heard from a friends.

There are good and bad points to be said about that...  If you do decide to come through Arizona drop me an email or PM. 
Logged
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,441


« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2006, 12:30:25 PM »

[quote author=Νεκτάριος link=topic=9013.msg120233#msg120233 date=1147278349]
There are good and bad points to be said about that...ÂÂ  If you do decide to come through Arizona drop me an email or PM.ÂÂ  
[/quote]

You mean you answer them? Tongue  I sent you one on April 3rd which you never answered.
Logged
Νεκτάριος
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 5,437



« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2006, 12:39:57 PM »

You bring up a good point.... I somehow missed that one.  whooops!

My email is in my profile and I do check that everyday, I sometimes forget about these PMs here.
Logged
TomS
Banned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOA
Posts: 3,186


"Look At Me! Look At Me Now! " - Bono


« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2006, 12:49:23 PM »

10236 Charing Cross Road, Holmby Hills, CA  Wink
Logged
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2006, 01:02:21 PM »

10236 Charing Cross Road, Holmby Hills, CAÂÂ  Wink

I don't get it. Maybe u gotta be American 2 get it.

Have you ever been to any of these monasteries, and is cost/length of travel an issue?
Since you're in Canada, I would reccommend Holy Trinity in Smiths Creek
Nope, I've only been to the ones I mentioned previously as well as St. John Maximovitch in Cali.

I like Holy Trinity but its not really traditional. I hear the abbot Yeronta Ioseef is really kind.

Logged
Νεκτάριος
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 5,437



« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 01:04:31 PM »

Quote
I don't get it. Maybe u gotta be American 2 get it.

Try googling it - I think the joke will become apparent right away.
Logged
pensateomnia
Bibliophylax
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Posts: 2,356


metron ariston


« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 01:34:41 PM »

I like Holy Trinity but its not really traditional.

Not traditional!? What do you mean? It doesn't have a $5 million 14th-century-style Katholikon? They don't always use the simantron when making their procession from the chapel to the trapeza after Vespers?

I guess you have to ask yourself: What is my motivation for going to a monastery this summer? Is it to go to the most "traditional" place, i.e. the place where enough money has made it possible to reconstruct the physical aspects of 16th-century Athos in North America? Or is my goal to go to a place where I can pray, spend time in spiritual reflection, simplicity and some manual labor -- in other words to revitalize my heart?

Now, there are places where one can do both, but I'm rather confused by your posts on the subject. Originally, you indicated that "traditional" -- as if that has anything to do with exteriors! -- may not be so good because, as your friends say, such places are "very beautiful" but also have a "certain element of rigidity that might not be so relaxing." What's your goal? To relax? To have an aesthestic experience? Or to deepen your spiritual life?

If you want REAL "traditional" you should probably just go camping (without any equipment) in the Canadian woods and do nothing but pray the Jesus Prayer. That would be more in line with the traditional roots of Orthodox monasticism.

Quote
I hear the abbot Yeronta Ioseef is really kind.

He is indeed, as are the other monks there. Just FYI: They have recently refurbished their chapel, so it is much nicer and more like a "traditional" Church (marble, carved wood and all!).
« Last Edit: May 10, 2006, 01:37:07 PM by pensateomnia » Logged

But for I am a man not textueel I wol noght telle of textes neuer a deel. (Chaucer, The Manciple's Tale, 1.131)
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2006, 01:38:29 PM »

I'll travel to Arizona if I have to. I also heard that St. George's Brotherhood, who's abbot is Archimandriti Christodoulos is also a blessed place to be.
Logged
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,441


« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2006, 01:42:07 PM »

Not traditional!? What do you mean? It doesn't have a $5 million 14th-century-style Katholikon? They don't always use the simantron when making their procession from the chapel to the trapeza after Vespers?

I guess you have to ask yourself: What is my motivation for going to a monastery this summer? Is it to go to the most "traditional" place, i.e. the place where enough money has made it possible to reconstruct the physical aspects of 16th-century Athos in North America?

My guess is that St. Anthony's is more like 16-century Athos than 16th-century Athos ever was.  They should share the wealth.
Logged
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2006, 01:48:11 PM »

Not traditional!? What do you mean? It doesn't have a $5 million 14th-century-style Katholikon? They don't always use the simantron when making their procession from the chapel to the trapeza after Vespers?

I guess you have to ask yourself: What is my motivation for going to a monastery this summer? Is it to go to the most "traditional" place, i.e. the place where enough money has made it possible to reconstruct the physical aspects of 16th-century Athos in North America? Or is my goal to go to a place where I can pray, spend time in spiritual reflection, simplicity and some manual labor -- in other words to revitalize my heart?

Now, there are places where one can do both, but I'm rather confused by your posts on the subject. Originally, you indicated that "traditional" -- as if that has anything to do with exteriors! -- may not be so good because, as your friends say, such places are "very beautiful" but also have a "certain element of rigidity that might not be so relaxing." What's your goal? To relax? To have an aesthestic experience? Or to deepen your spiritual life?

If you want REAL "traditional" you should probably just go camping (without any equipment) in the Canadian woods and do nothing but pray the Jesus Prayer. That would be more in line with the traditional roots of Orthodox monasticism.

He is indeed, as are the other monks there. Just FYI: They have recently refurbished their chapel, so it is much nicer and more like a "traditional" Church (marble, carved wood and all!).

Well, I'm sorry if I seem misguided to you. I want to go to a monastery that is nothing like a mall, a city church, or a log cabin. Certain physical elements really puts the soul in a certain spiritual mood. Sure, we can be spiritual all places, but its just more easier and condusive (for me) to be in a traditional place. I love Holy Trinity- then again I went on the feast day so it was busy and as such I couldn't really enjoy it as much. My goal is to relax, to deepen my spiritual life, to search out for a potential spiritual father, "to forget the worldly cares" which so many times eats away at us. And there's nothing wrong with wanting easthetic experience combined with spirituality- this is Orthodoxy remember- not Vatican II catholicism of making everything as plain and as drab as ever. Theres nothing wrong with using color, texture, and shape to "lift up our hearts."
Logged
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2006, 12:26:38 AM »

Are new calendar orthodox ppl in good standing allowed to receive communion in old calendar monasteries?
Part of me is saying a biig "noo", but I just thought I might ask. I wonder if new calendar ppl would even be accepted visiting old calendar monasteries/churches, let alone commune.
Logged
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2006, 09:30:27 AM »

Are new calendar orthodox ppl in good standing allowed to receive communion in old calendar monasteries?
It depends on what people think "good standing" is. I belong to a  New Calendar juristiction, and have received Holy Communion twice in Iveron Monastery (on Mount Athos, and Old Calendar). So the issue for them is not the Calendar. I do know, however, that there is an Old Calendarist monastery here in Australia where I would not be given Communion, since they view that I am not in "good standing" simply by virtue of the fact that I belong to a New Calendar Juristiction. On the other hand, another friend of mine who lives in Tasmania and belongs to the GO Archdiocese and Communes in a ROCOR monastery. So I don't think there is a general rule.
Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,487


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2006, 09:51:18 AM »

Are new calendar orthodox ppl in good standing allowed to receive communion in old calendar monasteries?
Part of me is saying a biig "noo", but I just thought I might ask. I wonder if new calendar ppl would even be accepted visiting old calendar monasteries/churches, let alone commune.

You have to distinguish between "Old Calendar following" monasteries and "Old CalenadarIST" monasteries.  Serbs, JP, ROCOR, some OCA, etc are Old Calendar, but in full communion with New Calendar Orthodox.  Others are Old CalendarIST meaning, refraining from communion with New Calendar Orthodox.  That makes a world of difference.  As far as I know, there is no Old CalendarIST monastery which would refuse your visit except maybe Esphigmenou.  I know our Old Calendarist Monastery in New York wouldn't refuse the visit of New Calendarists.  I even went with fellow OCnet Admin Mor Ephrem there once.  As for communion, that is a different story.

Anastasios
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.
pensateomnia
Bibliophylax
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Posts: 2,356


metron ariston


« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2006, 11:41:11 AM »

Well, I'm sorry if I seem misguided to you. I want to go to a monastery that is nothing like a mall, a city church, or a log cabin. Certain physical elements really puts the soul in a certain spiritual mood. Sure, we can be spiritual all places, but its just more easier and condusive (for me) to be in a traditional place. I love Holy Trinity- then again I went on the feast day so it was busy and as such I couldn't really enjoy it as much. My goal is to relax, to deepen my spiritual life, to search out for a potential spiritual father, "to forget the worldly cares" which so many times eats away at us. And there's nothing wrong with wanting easthetic experience combined with spirituality- this is Orthodoxy remember- not Vatican II catholicism of making everything as plain and as drab as ever. Theres nothing wrong with using color, texture, and shape to "lift up our hearts."

1) Going to a monastery on its feast day is NOTHING like going during the week and actually spending some time with the monks/the abbot, entering into the cycle of prayer, etc. etc. That holds true for any monastery in any country of any spiritual quality with any degree of wealth.

2) Have you ever spent time at any monastery (i.e. more than 2 days at once)? Actually doing so is a very different experience than visiting for a day or two. The longer you stay, the more important things such as the schedule of services, the opportunities for free time/assisting in chores, the availability of the abbot/monks and the other pilgrims become. THESE are the most important influences on the quality of your stay. If you enjoy and want to have isolation and EXTENDED time for silence, reading and reflection, then you will be just fine at a monastery that is not very friendly. You can just "do your thing" and the monks will do theirs. Unless you are used to such things, this can be dangerous because you will get lonely and dejected after a few days. However, if you also want interaction and spiritual conversation, then you should probably go to a monastery where (a) the monks are friendly and (b) the pilgrims are balanced and accessible (this is a major issue at monasteries, since, in many cases, your most consistent interaction will be with other pilgrims, whose number, quality and style can vary greatly from monastery to monastery). If, on the other hand, you want to really enter into the fullness of the monastic life, to get a taste of what it is like to LIVE in a monastery, with all its spiritual richness and difficulties, then you should go to a monastery that is spiritually grounded, friendly AND provides you the opportunity to do work along with the monks (gardening, clean up, kitchen duty, participation in the nightly vigils...).

3) The only way to know about this kind of INNER life of the monastery is to experience it or hear from someone else who has. That's what I'm trying to tell you about Holy Trinity. The monks there are willing and able to let you have ANY of those experiences. If you want isolation, you can have it. If you want to interact with the community, even to the point of helping the monks, you can as well. In times where there are not hordes of pilgrims, they are very welcoming and also very flexible.

Now, I have made all these kinds of pilgrimages to many different monasteries and I've been to built-up, expensively adorned monasteries that fall into the first "unfriendly" category, simply because they are so large, with so many pilgrims on a day-to-day basis (not just feast days!), that there is not enough time for interaction. In other cases, certain monasteries have a rule from their abbot that the monks should stay as isolated from the pilgrims as possible (thus, as a pilgrim, you spend all your free time sitting in a "beautiful" room, trying to read or pray, while the other pilgrims talk, the kids scream, etc.). I've even been to some monasteries where the lay visitors were extremely restricted in their freedom of movement (they could only go to the Church at designated times and, otherwise, they had to stay in the guest house).

Get the idea? These kinds of things are much more important than the impression you have of the buildings.
Logged

But for I am a man not textueel I wol noght telle of textes neuer a deel. (Chaucer, The Manciple's Tale, 1.131)
Νεκτάριος
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 5,437



« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2006, 12:51:22 PM »

Quote
As far as I know, there is no Old CalendarIST monastery which would refuse your visit except maybe Esphigmenou.

I'v been there - and I'm as new calendarist/ heretical / graceless / anathema / spawn of satan as they come. 
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,404


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2006, 02:17:27 PM »

I highly recomend these (in order of importance, in my opinion = based on me being there)

1.  St. Nektarios (upstate NY = Roscoe NY)

2.  Life-giving Spring (Dunlap, CA)

3.  St. John Chrysostom (Kenosha, WI)

4.  In fact, all of the Ephraim Monasteries are awesome (there's one in Harvard, IL...not sure of the name though...i can get back to you if no one else knows it)

5.  Annunciation (might be Assumption) of the Theotokos (SOC monastery in New Carlisle IN)

6.  Protection of the Theotokos - New Gracanica - Monastery (3rd Lake IL)

7.  St. Sava Monastery (Libertyville, IL) (There's not real monastic community anymore, just 1 monk.  But the SOC seminary is there.  Nice historical stuff too.  Shrine of St. Nikolai, etc.)

Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2006, 08:28:59 PM »


2) Have you ever spent time at any monastery (i.e. more than 2 days at once)? Actually doing so is a very different experience than visiting for a day or two. The longer you stay, the more important things such as the schedule of services, the opportunities for free time/assisting in chores, the availability of the abbot/monks and the other pilgrims become. THESE are the most important influences on the quality of your stay.

Get the idea? These kinds of things are much more important than the impression you have of the buildings.

Pensateomnia, I think you think I've never really been to a monastery for more than a day. Wrong. At Point Reyes, I went for a couple of days with some friends to St. John Wonderworker in the hills. It was really nice and their katholikon was like the size of my room times 2. I was standing at the door during liturgy, but then again, there were about 7 visitors. The place was really nice. The Abbot was the kindest, joliest man you'd ever know, and he even gave me a tiny russian icon of my name day.

At Agia Trias, a really nice monk/novice cant remember, talked to me and asked me to sweep the church's floor before the veneration of the relics. There were also 2 other little boys there helping staining wooden chairs.

2.ÂÂ  Life-giving Spring (Dunlap, CA)

Serb1389, Life Giving Springs is the BEST!!! (I've ever been to). The yerontissa is so kind and gentle, and the nuns are quite talkative- esp. the 2 elderly ones and the one who runs the bookstore. The only drawback to my visit was the priest who was there was moving out and he would often refuse to pray liturgy there because of the greek...he was a convert and he'd pray liturgy in another location on the grounds with the wife as the chanter/reader... But at least they've got a very nice priest now.
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,404


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2006, 03:12:35 PM »

I agree.  That place is amazing!  the yerondisa is something else.  So loving...

Anyway, I really like it.  Except for the iconography....i'm not even sure its Cretan  Wink
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Timos
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 856



« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2006, 12:29:20 AM »

soo true! You'd think that its a traditional monastery under elder Ephraim, the iconography would at least be half-decent! They're cool I guess. Serb, look at the Ressurection icon- it looks like Christ is "taking out the trash" lmho Smiley
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,404


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2006, 01:53:44 PM »

The entire backing for the monastery came from Met. Anthony (of blessed memory). 

He was Cretan...hard core.  So that's why all the iconography is Cretan, without it being that the monastery would have never been built.  So eh...you win some, you lose some... Wink
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Bogoliubtsy
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,268



« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2006, 02:53:37 PM »

I highly recomend these (in order of importance, in my opinion = based on me being there)

1.  St. Nektarios (upstate NY = Roscoe NY)

2.  Life-giving Spring (Dunlap, CA)

3.  St. John Chrysostom (Kenosha, WI)

4.  In fact, all of the Ephraim Monasteries are awesome (there's one in Harvard, IL...not sure of the name though...i can get back to you if no one else knows it)

5.  Annunciation (might be Assumption) of the Theotokos (SOC monastery in New Carlisle IN)

6.  Protection of the Theotokos - New Gracanica - Monastery (3rd Lake IL)

7.  St. Sava Monastery (Libertyville, IL) (There's not real monastic community anymore, just 1 monk.  But the SOC seminary is there.  Nice historical stuff too.  Shrine of St. Nikolai, etc.)



Hi Serb,
Do you think you could tell me more about St. Nektarios monastery? It's about 2 hours from where I live and I've been considering visiting for some time. Are there English speaking monks there? Is the liturgical language solely Greek? Roughly how many monks are there? Is there room for visitors?

Thanks very much for any info!
Logged

"When you give food to the poor, they call you a saint. When you ask why the poor have no food, they call you a communist". - Archbishop Hélder Pessoa Câmara
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,404


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2006, 06:41:35 AM »

Firstly, you ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO GO THERE!  It is the most spiritual monastery i've ever been to (hence why its first). 

Almost all of the monks speak english, so just walk up to one and ask questions, if they don't know english, you'll know. 

They have tons of rooms for guests and they will provide you with a bed, linens, towels, a shower, etc.  All you have to do is call in advance and ask them for the blessing to stay overnight.  You can just go during the day though, since you live so close. 

The liturgical language is Greek (liturgical) and everything, and I mean EVERYTHING, is read or done in Greek.  (ie. the services, prayers, etc.) 

There are about 15-17 monks..I always forget.  There's not a lot, but there arn't a few either.  They have the full liturgical cycle, all the services including compline and the hours, and their chanter, Father (monk) Ephraim is better than any chanter i've ever heard in my life (no joke). 

You can Google them for more info.  Calling them would be prudent, especially for how to get there, and for permission to just stop by.  Usually you want to get a blessing...but since you live so close it might not be a big deal.  They are very warm, but don't be surprised if they ask you to come back with a blessing...they are monks  Wink

Also, I would hold off on going to confession with the yeronda.  A lot of people are very gung-ho about their first visit.  Just go see the place first and then talk to your priest about seeing a monk for confession. 
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Bogoliubtsy
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,268



« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2006, 11:55:26 AM »

Thanks very much! That was helpful. If I find time to make it out there, I'll let you know how it went.
Logged

"When you give food to the poor, they call you a saint. When you ask why the poor have no food, they call you a communist". - Archbishop Hélder Pessoa Câmara
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,404


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2006, 12:42:51 PM »

I would appreciate that.  I really love the monks there, they're awesome!! 
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
quietnow
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: eastern orthodox
Jurisdiction: antiochian
Posts: 1


« Reply #27 on: May 24, 2006, 05:33:13 AM »

i am surprised no one has mentioned st. herman of alaska monastery in platina, ca.  http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/images/platina/
Logged
Tags: Monastery 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.096 seconds with 54 queries.