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Author Topic: Akathists, Canons/ Paraklesis  (Read 4133 times) Average Rating: 0
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Timos
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« on: May 06, 2006, 03:02:08 PM »

everyone, post your favourite Akathist, canon/Paraklesis to the MOG, a saint, guardian angel, commemoration of an icon, feast day etc.

One of my favourites is the Akathist to the Mother of God "Nurturer of children"

http://www.serfes.org/orthodox/NuturerofChildren.htm

Another favourite for me is the Akathist of Thanksgiving. There are currently 2 fab english CD's out there in traditional Russian tunes.

Does anyone know if laypeople are allowed to compose Akathists?
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Timos
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2006, 11:08:57 PM »

Theres also a popular akathist to the gaurdian angle which I believe is very powerful.
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2006, 12:08:50 AM »

Years ago I heard an akathist to an icon of the Mother of God called "The Rescuer of the Perishing."  It was at an OCA church and it was beautiful.  Does anyone know if a CD has ever been recorded of this particular akathist, or if the words for it are online?
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2006, 03:58:46 AM »

I ahve heard that it is not uncommon in Russia for the laity to produce Akathists. I have read several written by noblemen after the destruction of Imperial Russia in praise of certain Martyrs and even for the Holy Royal martyrs. These as they gain popularity are sometimes rewritten or edited by clergy for general distribution. Several  Akathists I was gven by friends in ROCOR were written by high School students.

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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2006, 04:09:48 PM »

That's actually a good idea, I should go write an Akathist sometime...
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2006, 04:26:18 PM »

How does one write an Akathist?
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"If you give the average Frenchman a choice between a reforming president who would plug the country's huge deficit and a good cheese, he would probably opt for the cheese." - Stephen Clarke
I think the French may be on to something here.
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2006, 05:18:22 PM »

Anyone can write an "akathist" since its just a suppication to God.  The question of making it an actual SERVICE in the church is a seperate issue.  

In order to write an akathist you would just follow the model of an already established service, like the one to the Theotokos (small paraklisis of the theotokos).  

I believe the rough model would be 9 odes, with an eirmos of each ode, and then 2-3 hymns, with a doxastikon and a theotokion (or something to the saint...however usually even if the akathist is to a saint they will keep the theotokion)  

Then after the canon, there would be petitions of some kind to the saint or feast, and then some closing hymns (which are debatable) concluded with an apolytikon of some kind and a dismissal.  

All those liturgically inclined can help make this more clear...I am but a novice in these things...
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2006, 05:27:43 PM »

An Akathist has a certain basic structure. I would not take the Akathist or Canon to the Theotokos as the prime example since that is somewhat more complex and rich.


First, the Kontakion is written, which begins the akathist and usually sums up the entire "theme" of the Akathist. This is usually repeated throughout the akathist- or sometimes just once at the beginning, once at the end.

Then, you compose the verses for the feast/saint/theme.

Then there is a short repetitive refrain like "Most Holy Theotokos Save us" said/chanted between each stanza or verse.

From what I observe, every 5 to 7 verses, Alleluia (3x) is inserted at the end of the verse. Someone with more liturgical info can elaborate on this.

Then, at the end, there can be a prayer to Christ, Panagia, the saint to who it is dedicated to, etc.

Thats a very basic explanation of it. It's not really that hard if you already have something in mind or are good at writing.
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Timos
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2006, 05:29:32 PM »

For an example of an akathist to a saint, there is an english byzantine style CD out there of a Paraklesis to St. Nektarios Pentapoleos. That one is awesome too.
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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2006, 05:42:28 PM »

I agree with you Timos,  

The one of the Theotokos was the first thing that sprung up in my mind.  Thanks for the alternate info!  
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« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2006, 08:43:59 PM »

Yeah, the Theotokos one sprung to mind also, but the Greek usage differs slightly from slavic usage and I am not familiar with slavic/antiochian usage. For example, I don't know if "Ti Ipermaho" is sung in slavic usage or if "awed by the beauty of your virginity" is purely a greek usage or if all of them use it.
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serb1389
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« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2006, 09:10:15 AM »

I would have no idea.  I've never actually heard or even read the akathist to the Theotokos as a service.  Just the one in the prayer books...I always get confused if its the same thing.  Cuz the Slavic one is definately NOT anywhere close to the Greek one....but i've heard that there are "moleben" services that resemble paraklesis....i'm not sure though.  
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« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2006, 08:12:33 PM »

Serb1389, I thought a moleben was a memorial, not an akathist?

How does one write an Akathist?

http://www.orthodoxwiki.org/Akathist
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« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2006, 08:45:06 PM »

Great thoughts, guys!
Well actually, a memorial service is called panikhida (panihida) in Slavic tradition. A moleben is a paraklesis.
http://www.orthodoxwiki.org/Paraklesis
In Slavic tradition akathists in particular to Theotokos, can be separate services, usually after the litrurgy or a part of these moleben.
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« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2006, 01:44:50 AM »

Quote
but i've heard that there are "moleben" services that resemble paraklesis

On Dečani's webpage http://kosovo.net/main.html (almost at the very bottom) is a link to chanting that is, as far as I can tell, the same type of service as the Greek paraklesis. The Moleben done at the Russian parish here is nothing like the Greek paraklesis.   
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« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2006, 01:58:14 AM »

I thought a Molieben was a service of Thanksgiving - Panikhida is a memorial.
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Timos
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« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2006, 08:39:42 AM »

[quote author=Νεκτάριος link=topic=8981.msg120013#msg120013 date=1147153490]
The Moleben done at the Russian parish here is nothing like the Greek paraklesis.ÂÂ  
[/quote]

Nothing like it at all? Hmm, I wonder if OCA parishes do it according to this same russian usage but in english- I'd love to drop by.

(ASIDE: O wait, the nearest OCA parish is 40 minutes (not too bad) by car because all the orthodox have been taken by us ethnics. Whenever I want to take a non-orthodox friend to services, I end up not doing it because it would mostly or all be in slavic, greek, or arabic so there is an upside to having a non ethnic orthodox parish I guess).

I thought a Molieben was a service of Thanksgiving - Panikhida is a memorial.

Well there is an Akathist of Thankgsiving which is quite popular now and theres 2 english language, russian style CD's out on it also. Most of the time, an Akathist is done in thankgsiving for God, or in supplication- but then one would probably do a Supplicatory Canon (Paraklesis)- hence the name.
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serb1389
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« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2006, 09:32:29 AM »

dude i don't even remember what they're called right now.  Finals are killing me...i'll get back to you...

You might be right about the moleben thing...its a memorial service...

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