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Offline Gorazd

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Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« on: February 28, 2015, 11:43:07 PM »
Hi all,

Are there any Orthodox Christians here who have practised Buddhism before or who are familiar with it?
Also, are there any Buddhists familiar with Orthodoxy?
What do you think about the other religion and why did you choose the one you are practising now?

Please no fights, insults, personal attacks...

Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2015, 11:51:53 PM »
Iconodule and Jetavan set me straight with some good tips and have collected more infos since.

In short, I think this comparison is going to go nowhere. Against Christianity, much less Orthodoxy, Buddhsim is much more differentiated and diverse in practice, belief, etc.

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Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2015, 12:02:09 AM »
Iconodule and Jetavan set me straight with some good tips and have collected more infos since.

In short, I think this comparison is going to go nowhere. Against Christianity, much less Orthodoxy, Buddhsim is much more differentiated and diverse in practice, belief, etc.

I would agree with that. But I would also agree that there is some similarity, in particular it's ascetic and monastic tradition.
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Offline sakura95

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2015, 12:18:44 AM »
I used to be a Buddhist, a cultural one that is, so I didn't know anything about it in the first place. It's only as a Christian that I explored Buddhism but I can't say I'm familiar with it overall.

As a whole Buddhism is a pretty logical and consistent religion. Some of its key ideas such as the cause of Suffering, Dependent Origination and Noble Eightfold Path are pretty agreeable and consistent with Orthodox Christianity. I unapologetically admit that I adopted some concepts and ideas from Buddhist philosophy. But unfortunately Buddhism while consistent is incomplete. There isn't any explanation as to how human beings brought suffering upon themselves instead relying upon the idea that someone have gone through an unspecified number of past lives which doesn't give a single source. Christianity gives a source to all suffering.










« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 12:19:19 AM by sakura95 »
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Offline JamesR

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2015, 12:52:11 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?
...Or it's just possible he's a mouthy young man on an internet forum.
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Offline Jonathan Gress

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2015, 01:02:23 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

Well if you believe the scholarship which says the life of SS Barlaam and Ioasaph are a reworking of the life of Buddha, then Christ might have said "You're here early! I'll be expecting you in Paradise in a few centuries!"

Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2015, 01:03:15 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

Sounds like the start of a great joke.

Offline lovesupreme

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2015, 01:09:43 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

Sounds like the start of a great joke.

Or a manga.

Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2015, 01:19:37 AM »
I used to be a Buddhist, a cultural one that is, so I didn't know anything about it in the first place. It's only as a Christian that I explored Buddhism but I can't say I'm familiar with it overall.

As a whole Buddhism is a pretty logical and consistent religion. Some of its key ideas such as the cause of Suffering, Dependent Origination and Noble Eightfold Path are pretty agreeable and consistent with Orthodox Christianity. I unapologetically admit that I adopted some concepts and ideas from Buddhist philosophy. But unfortunately Buddhism while consistent is incomplete. There isn't any explanation as to how human beings brought suffering upon themselves instead relying upon the idea that someone have gone through an unspecified number of past lives which doesn't give a single source. Christianity gives a source to all suffering.

Again this is nonsense. Upon what is God dependent? Seriously, you don't understand this aspect clearly. Along with it you have anatman and Sunyata which couldn't be more foreign to odoxy.

Some Buddhisms do in fact offer a clear and coherent reason for human suffering.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 01:20:10 AM by orthonorm »
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Offline sakura95

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2015, 02:00:17 AM »
I used to be a Buddhist, a cultural one that is, so I didn't know anything about it in the first place. It's only as a Christian that I explored Buddhism but I can't say I'm familiar with it overall.

As a whole Buddhism is a pretty logical and consistent religion. Some of its key ideas such as the cause of Suffering, Dependent Origination and Noble Eightfold Path are pretty agreeable and consistent with Orthodox Christianity. I unapologetically admit that I adopted some concepts and ideas from Buddhist philosophy. But unfortunately Buddhism while consistent is incomplete. There isn't any explanation as to how human beings brought suffering upon themselves instead relying upon the idea that someone have gone through an unspecified number of past lives which doesn't give a single source. Christianity gives a source to all suffering.

Again this is nonsense. Upon what is God dependent? Seriously, you don't understand this aspect clearly. Along with it you have anatman and Sunyata which couldn't be more foreign to odoxy.

Some Buddhisms do in fact offer a clear and coherent reason for human suffering.

The Hua Yen School are quite content with having all things being created by the "One Mind" or the Buddha's mind that created all other minds. Some Schools believe in the godlike Adi-Buddha that is "self originating" and existing before all things. This allows God to be not dependent upon events and phenomenons but rather as with the Hua Yen School, causes these interdepending events to occur and sustain them.

Sunyata(Emptiness) does not necessarily mean that things are actually "nothing". It can be used to mean by some Schools that all things are dependently originated or without "independent existence" hence being "empty". While foreign to Orthodoxy, it does not oppose it. All phenomenon are sustained by God's operative Energies meaning that without them, things would fall apart and would not exist. In this sense is existence "dependent" upon God.

The reason for Suffering is primarily due to Ignorance which is the first link in the Twelve Nidanas which Buddhists in general would agree upon and would be consistent. However the problem is why human beings are in a condition of Ignorance in the first place. Where did it come from? Christianity is able to give an answer to this through Original Sin.

Buddhism and Orthodoxy are compatible on many points which I readily admit. But I'm willing to admit that ideas such as reincarnation is definitely incompatible and in no manner reconcilable with Orthodoxy.

« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 02:21:08 AM by sakura95 »
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Offline Minnesotan

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2015, 02:02:56 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

There was a book written about that scenario, I think.
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Offline Volnutt

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2015, 02:34:01 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

Yeah I've also wondered that re: the legend of St. Ioasaph. Maybe the Buddha really is a Christian Saint in Heaven now. With God all things are possible...
« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 02:34:19 AM by Volnutt »
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Offline Volnutt

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2015, 02:36:54 AM »

The reason for Suffering is primarily due to Ignorance which is the first link in the Twelve Nidanas which Buddhists in general would agree upon and would be consistent. However the problem is why human beings are in a condition of Ignorance in the first place. Where did it come from? Christianity is able to give an answer to this through Original Sin.

Perhaps one could also look at the Orthodox theology of Atonement. We don't realize and constantly forget that Christ has already died for us and redeemed us. If we were to hold that knowledge perfectly, we would not sin.
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2015, 03:00:39 AM »
I was a practicing Theravada Buddhist for close to 10 years and was going to move to Sri Lanka to be a Buddhist Monk (Until God stopped me). Feel free to PM me any questions you might have and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2015, 03:03:09 AM »
I've often wondered how Siddhartha Gautama and Christ would have interacted with each other. Technically wouldn't they have met when Christ preached to the souls in Hades?

Sounds like the start of a great joke.

Or a manga.

lol I've read one chapter of that.
Not everything I type or have typed in the past is reflective of the teaching of the Orthodox Church, or may not reflect my contemporary views on a subject. (4/6/2015)

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Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2015, 03:19:07 AM »
I used to be a Buddhist, a cultural one that is, so I didn't know anything about it in the first place. It's only as a Christian that I explored Buddhism but I can't say I'm familiar with it overall.

As a whole Buddhism is a pretty logical and consistent religion. Some of its key ideas such as the cause of Suffering, Dependent Origination and Noble Eightfold Path are pretty agreeable and consistent with Orthodox Christianity. I unapologetically admit that I adopted some concepts and ideas from Buddhist philosophy. But unfortunately Buddhism while consistent is incomplete. There isn't any explanation as to how human beings brought suffering upon themselves instead relying upon the idea that someone have gone through an unspecified number of past lives which doesn't give a single source. Christianity gives a source to all suffering.

Again this is nonsense. Upon what is God dependent? Seriously, you don't understand this aspect clearly. Along with it you have anatman and Sunyata which couldn't be more foreign to odoxy.

Some Buddhisms do in fact offer a clear and coherent reason for human suffering.

The Hua Yen School are quite content with having all things being created by the "One Mind" or the Buddha's mind that created all other minds. Some Schools believe in the godlike Adi-Buddha that is "self originating" and existing before all things. This allows God to be not dependent upon events and phenomenons but rather as with the Hua Yen School, causes these interdepending events to occur and sustain them.

Sunyata(Emptiness) does not necessarily mean that things are actually "nothing". It can be used to mean by some Schools that all things are dependently originated or without "independent existence" hence being "empty". While foreign to Orthodoxy, it does not oppose it. All phenomenon are sustained by God's operative Energies meaning that without them, things would fall apart and would not exist. In this sense is existence "dependent" upon God.

The reason for Suffering is primarily due to Ignorance which is the first link in the Twelve Nidanas which Buddhists in general would agree upon and would be consistent. However the problem is why human beings are in a condition of Ignorance in the first place. Where did it come from? Christianity is able to give an answer to this through Original Sin.

Buddhism and Orthodoxy are compatible on many points which I readily admit. But I'm willing to admit that ideas such as reincarnation is definitely incompatible and in no manner reconcilable with Orthodoxy.

Yes, there are Buddhisms which are incoherent. They seem to be the ones which you enjoy. Anything approaching one mind, buddha mind, etc. as you understand it is just a Vedism in Saffron Robes.

Buddhism and odoxy have almost nothing in common. I know you enjoy syncretism, but I am not sure you understand the basics of either religion we are discussing here.

If you think sunyata is somehow equivalent to man's dependence on God for his existence, then while we might be discussing a confused Buddhism, we are not discussing odoxy.

Odoxy has more in common with Islam.
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Offline JamesR

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2015, 03:20:08 AM »
I was a practicing Theravada Buddhist for close to 10 years and was going to move to Sri Lanka to be a Buddhist Monk (Until God stopped me). Feel free to PM me any questions you might have and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

Was Siddhartha Gautama Theravada? When I learned about Buddhism in school a long time ago, we learned that Theravada is the oldest school and so I figured it's probably the one he established, for lack of a better term.
...Or it's just possible he's a mouthy young man on an internet forum.
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Offline Minnesotan

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2015, 03:36:56 AM »
Buddhism and odoxy have almost nothing in common. I know you enjoy syncretism, but I am not sure you understand the basics of either religion we are discussing here.

If you think sunyata is somehow equivalent to man's dependence on God for his existence, then while we might be discussing a confused Buddhism, we are not discussing odoxy.

Odoxy has more in common with Islam.

And what makes you, of all people, qualified to make this judgment?

The only movements within Islam that I can see similarities with are Sufism, and to some extent Shiism, but that's only because the Shiites actually borrowed stuff from Christianity in the first place: icons, rosaries/prayer-ropes (which became tasbih), etc.

Sufis and other related schools have a lot of mystical, "uncreated light" aspects to their beliefs and practices. Those types of practices were common for a while in India and Pakistan where there was a lot of contact between Muslims, Hindus and Buddhists, but recently the trend (in Pakistan at least) has been toward a radical Wahhabi-esque theology that sees such mysticism as idolatrous.

The Muslims who are currently making world headlines in Iraq, Syria, and Libya don't even consider Shiism or Sufism to be "real" Islam at all.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 03:37:11 AM by Minnesotan »
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Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2015, 03:37:36 AM »
I was a practicing Theravada Buddhist for close to 10 years and was going to move to Sri Lanka to be a Buddhist Monk (Until God stopped me). Feel free to PM me any questions you might have and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

Was Siddhartha Gautama Theravada? When I learned about Buddhism in school a long time ago, we learned that Theravada is the oldest school and so I figured it's probably the one he established, for lack of a better term.

Theravada that nearly everyone is practicingis a post colonial misagos. It has more to do with European phenomonolgy than anything else.

Theravadans think they have the true faith. Really Buddhsim is a very complex human behavior.

Been reading he following lately. Highly recommended.

http://www.amazon.com/Fundamental-Wisdom-Middle-Way-Mulamadhyamakakarika/dp/0195093364/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425195434&sr=1-1&keywords=nagarjuna
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2015, 03:40:10 AM »
I was a practicing Theravada Buddhist for close to 10 years and was going to move to Sri Lanka to be a Buddhist Monk (Until God stopped me). Feel free to PM me any questions you might have and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

Was Siddhartha Gautama Theravada? When I learned about Buddhism in school a long time ago, we learned that Theravada is the oldest school and so I figured it's probably the one he established, for lack of a better term.

Theravada, the most ancient form of Buddhism. It is the "Orthodox" of Buddhism, so yes. It's considered the same practice as the Buddha. While the other forms like Mahayana, Zen and Tibetan might have different practice, they all still believe in Saṃsāra, The Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. Just like in Christianity, there are many different belief systems, practices and traditions but they all believe in Christ, Heaven and Sin etc etc. An example of the differences would belike a Baptist Christian might say you are going to burn in hell, and a Orthodox might not say that. A Theravada Buddhist wouldn't feed a homeless person, but a Mahayana Buddhist would.  Same "religions" difference practice and beliefs.

Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2015, 03:49:31 AM »
Buddhism and odoxy have almost nothing in common. I know you enjoy syncretism, but I am not sure you understand the basics of either religion we are discussing here.

If you think sunyata is somehow equivalent to man's dependence on God for his existence, then while we might be discussing a confused Buddhism, we are not discussing odoxy.

Odoxy has more in common with Islam.

And what makes you, of all people, qualified to make this judgment?

The only movements within Islam that I can see similarities with are Sufism, and to some extent Shiism, but that's only because the Shiites actually borrowed stuff from Christianity in the first place: icons, rosaries/prayer-ropes (which became tasbih), etc.

Sufis and other related schools have a lot of mystical, "uncreated light" aspects to their beliefs and practices. Those types of practices were common for a while in India and Pakistan where there was a lot of contact between Muslims, Hindus and Buddhists, but recently the trend (in Pakistan at least) has been toward a radical Wahhabi-esque theology that sees such mysticism as idolatrous.

The Muslims who are currently making world headlines in Iraq, Syria, and Libya don't even consider Shiism or Sufism to be "real" Islam at all.

I am qualified cause I can parse a few sentences in Eglish. I know Buddhsims is everyone's favorite fall back religion, but it does put change the fact it has almost nothing in common with odoxy, unless we talking the mystical clap trap that people enjoy who seem to want to keep one foot in each boat.

There are clear and coherent treatments within each tradition and it's hard to imagine some more mutually exclusive than the two when you simply start with the basics.

Again Buddism can mean a lot of things, see above. We have someone here who thinks Buddha taught the anatman and that sunyata is somehow God.

So yeah, back to parsing a few sentences.

Even the Buddhism most people think is just Christianity in Japanese clothes is still miles away. Just finished reading most of the foundational texts of Shin Buddhism. Even if you allow for Renyo's arguably reactionary alterations in Shinran's thought, the entire approach to being, salvation, etc. are different.

Muslims believe in many of the same prophets, they believe in God. They would never accept dependent arising / origin, nor should a Christian. A muslim would embrace the atman, as would a Christian. A muslim would laugh at sunyata, as would a Christian.

Really I could do this for about 50 more items off the top of my head.

So it comes down to being able to understand a little English.
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2015, 03:50:03 AM »
In the words of Father Seraphim Rose, "Many Eastern religions are fine as far as they go, but only Christianity can open heaven to you..."


Seriously stay away from Buddhism, it's just another temptation of the devil to lead you away from Christ. It's full of contradictions, extremely selfish goals, rituals and multiple realms that can't be explained. It's not a philosophy, it's a religion, they believe in demons, heavens, hells, gods, prayer, hatred of the body, reincarnation. The ultimate goal in Buddhism is to not be anymore, blow out the flame as it were. They want to get rid of self. Why would you want to be apart of a religion the knows it's goal is to end eternal life? Do your research and you'll see it's nothing but a trick of the devil. Look around and you'll even see ancient images of Buddha being held up by a demon.

Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2015, 03:52:50 AM »
I was a practicing Theravada Buddhist for close to 10 years and was going to move to Sri Lanka to be a Buddhist Monk (Until God stopped me). Feel free to PM me any questions you might have and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

Was Siddhartha Gautama Theravada? When I learned about Buddhism in school a long time ago, we learned that Theravada is the oldest school and so I figured it's probably the one he established, for lack of a better term.

Theravada, the most ancient form of Buddhism. It is the "Orthodox" of Buddhism, so yes. It's considered the same practice as the Buddha. While the other forms like Mahayana, Zen and Tibetan might have different practice, they all still believe in Saṃsāra, The Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. Just like in Christianity, there are many different belief systems, practices and traditions but they all believe in Christ, Heaven and Sin etc etc. An example of the differences would belike a Baptist Christian might say you are going to burn in hell, and a Orthodox might not say that. A Theravada Buddhist wouldn't feed a homeless person, but a Mahayana Buddhist would.  Same "religions" difference practice and beliefs.

This is the company line, but he historical record is more complex suggests some else entirely and today's Theravadan owes more to Husserl than Buddha.

Anyway, if people want Buddhism as their fall back religion. Fine.

If anyone wants to read the above text and discuss it awesome. Or anything by Shinran.
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Offline orthonorm

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2015, 04:29:29 AM »
To the OP, search for buddhism here using Iconodule as the user and Jetavan.

You'll find gold.

Maybe I'll come back later say what odoxy and buddhism do have in common. It's the bad parts in general. Participants desire for mystical mumbo jumbo over reasoned discourse, private spiritual experiences over changing the world, quietism, tendency toward autocraticism, etc. IOW, perhaps not what either is about but what has marked both and the interests at least around this board for them.
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2015, 04:46:48 AM »


Maybe I'll come back later say what odoxy and buddhism do have in common.

I'm confused....the OP didn't ask anything about them being in common.

Offline sakura95

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2015, 05:05:51 AM »
I used to be a Buddhist, a cultural one that is, so I didn't know anything about it in the first place. It's only as a Christian that I explored Buddhism but I can't say I'm familiar with it overall.

As a whole Buddhism is a pretty logical and consistent religion. Some of its key ideas such as the cause of Suffering, Dependent Origination and Noble Eightfold Path are pretty agreeable and consistent with Orthodox Christianity. I unapologetically admit that I adopted some concepts and ideas from Buddhist philosophy. But unfortunately Buddhism while consistent is incomplete. There isn't any explanation as to how human beings brought suffering upon themselves instead relying upon the idea that someone have gone through an unspecified number of past lives which doesn't give a single source. Christianity gives a source to all suffering.

Again this is nonsense. Upon what is God dependent? Seriously, you don't understand this aspect clearly. Along with it you have anatman and Sunyata which couldn't be more foreign to odoxy.

Some Buddhisms do in fact offer a clear and coherent reason for human suffering.

The Hua Yen School are quite content with having all things being created by the "One Mind" or the Buddha's mind that created all other minds. Some Schools believe in the godlike Adi-Buddha that is "self originating" and existing before all things. This allows God to be not dependent upon events and phenomenons but rather as with the Hua Yen School, causes these interdepending events to occur and sustain them.

Sunyata(Emptiness) does not necessarily mean that things are actually "nothing". It can be used to mean by some Schools that all things are dependently originated or without "independent existence" hence being "empty". While foreign to Orthodoxy, it does not oppose it. All phenomenon are sustained by God's operative Energies meaning that without them, things would fall apart and would not exist. In this sense is existence "dependent" upon God.

The reason for Suffering is primarily due to Ignorance which is the first link in the Twelve Nidanas which Buddhists in general would agree upon and would be consistent. However the problem is why human beings are in a condition of Ignorance in the first place. Where did it come from? Christianity is able to give an answer to this through Original Sin.

Buddhism and Orthodoxy are compatible on many points which I readily admit. But I'm willing to admit that ideas such as reincarnation is definitely incompatible and in no manner reconcilable with Orthodoxy.

Yes, there are Buddhisms which are incoherent. They seem to be the ones which you enjoy. Anything approaching one mind, buddha mind, etc. as you understand it is just a Vedism in Saffron Robes.

Buddhism and odoxy have almost nothing in common. I know you enjoy syncretism, but I am not sure you understand the basics of either religion we are discussing here.

If you think sunyata is somehow equivalent to man's dependence on God for his existence, then while we might be discussing a confused Buddhism, we are not discussing odoxy.

Odoxy has more in common with Islam.

In what sense are the Mahayana branch of Buddhism, particularly the Hua Yen School are incoherent? The most you can say is that it's not exactly true Buddhism given its difference from what the original Buddha taught unless you can somehow point out some inconsistencies within their respective philosophies.

If you read my first comment on this thread you would've known that I don't know much about Buddhism though I know the basics of its beliefs.

I have never said that the concept of Emptiness is somehow related to God's existence. I was simply placing it in the framework of Orthodoxy. I explicitly made clear that Sunyata is taken to be as some schools of Buddhism would believe to be a thing that is "dependently originated" and "not having any independent existence". That definition of Sunyata is also the definition given by the man whose work you had been reading lately, Nagarjuna.

Orthodoxy have many things in common with Islam just as it has with Protestantism, Catholicism, Hinduism and most other religions and philosophies out there in existence.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 05:20:43 AM by sakura95 »
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Offline sakura95

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2015, 05:15:02 AM »

The reason for Suffering is primarily due to Ignorance which is the first link in the Twelve Nidanas which Buddhists in general would agree upon and would be consistent. However the problem is why human beings are in a condition of Ignorance in the first place. Where did it come from? Christianity is able to give an answer to this through Original Sin.

Perhaps one could also look at the Orthodox theology of Atonement. We don't realize and constantly forget that Christ has already died for us and redeemed us. If we were to hold that knowledge perfectly, we would not sin.

Yes it is true. It could be that we might even be unaware of our Fallen State and simply assumed our Sinful nature to be something natural and normal when Orthodoxy views it as unnatural to human beings.
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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2015, 03:14:15 PM »
In my opinion Buddhism is the main rival to Orthodoxy and Roman Carholicism when it comes to attracting people interested in monasticism and meditation.

For my part I view Buddhism as an evil religion, grossly overrated, and incredibly sectarian.  Causing a schism in the Sangha is supposed to lead to damnation according to the Buddha, yet we have hundreds of varieties of this religion.  And it's nowhere near as tolerant as people in the West would like to believe.  Bhutan recently violently expelled its Hindu population in order to maintain its purity as a Buddhist state.  The oppressive and corrupt Thai government and the political violence in Thailand has been perpetrated by Therevada Buddhists. 

The 14th Dalai Lama is a nice enough chap, but his predecessors were cruel dictators whose selection by the monks and Godlike status gave them a theocratic cruelty.  CS Lewis wrote a wonderful piece on the advantages of a robber baron versus a false theocrat that I believe applies well.  Fortunately if Tibet regains its independence, and I hope it will, it will be without a Dalai Lama as absolute ruler, as the 14th Dalai Lama has relinquished spiritual power and gone a step further by saying he might "reincarnate as a woman, or not at all."  Such prelest!  Buddhism is a delusion built atop another delusion, reincarnation, and usually featues a cosmology of a pre-existent eternal universe that has been proven false (IMO the Big Bang proves creation ex nihlo).

There exists this view in the West that Buddhism is this incredibly peaceful, wonderful haven of a religion where one can embrace non violence and find inner peace.  But his romantic view of Buddhism is not born out by the facts.  The monastery where Chan or Zen Buddhism was invented prides itself as a center for martial arts.  How can a monastery be a school for fighting?  Buddhism is superficislly like Christian monasticism, but the difference is instead of love, it has non-attachment, instead of life everlasting, Therevada Buddhism and other classical schools equate nirvana with oblivion, once the person who has attained it dies.  Pure Land Buddhism appears instead to offer a progression of heavens.  Certainly some forms of Buddhism are better than others.  I find much to like in Shingon Buddhism and the syncretic Shugendo religion of Japan.

But as Indian Dharmid religions go, I think Buddhism is vastly overrated.  There are branches of Hinduism that are just as egalitarian and non violent; Brahminical Hinduism is a bit nasty, as is the perverse Aghori sect, but who could object to the Bishnoi?  The Jaims renounce violence completely.  My only lament is they seem to prioritize animal life over human life and allow a form of suicide.  But both religions seem to be very noble.  And as violent Dharmic religion goes, I love the warrior saint ethos of Sikhism, it's monotheism, and it's emphasis on service and protection; from what I understand the Sikhs played a major role in protecting the subcontinent from Islamic domination.  Growing up in the 4th grade my best friend was a Sikh boy named Hartaj.  His parents owned an independent supermarket.  So he and I used to play around there late at night and build castles with empty food crates.  It was pure fun.  As far Eastern religion goes, I find Taoism to be the source of much of the interesting thought one finds in Zen Buddhism, without the Dharmic baggage.  And Shrine Shinto seems a lovely, simple religion. 

But I am a Christian, and none of these religions appeal to me that much.  Although I do find the use of a sacred thread by the priestly caste of Hinduism, Zoroastrianism and Mandaeism to be interesting, and the dogmatic opposition to Hinduism in Zoroastrianism, and the relation of Zoroastrianism and Mandaeism to Christianity.  This hints at some ancient hieratic religion of which Hinduism might be a heretical offshoot, the religion of Noah, which would have been superseded by the Anrahamic Covenant and Judaism.  But such an ancient religion even if it still existed would be worthless since we have Christ.  The only really interesting religion in India, the only one I would practice, is Christianity, which has been there since St. Thomas established a mission.  And I weep over the fact that Christianity failed to evangelize the 50 million or so Dalits (Untouchables) who joined Buddhism around the time of Independence.  But it's not too late; there are lots of suffering people in India and Christianity is actually the third largest religion after Hinduism and Islam; according to Wikipedia the Christians roughly equal in number the combined total of Sikhs and Jains.  So that's good.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2015, 03:14:57 PM by wgw »

Offline Charles Martel

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2015, 05:33:47 AM »
I engaged in some Zen meditation practices back in my martial arts days, very effective for focus and calming the mind.

I looked deeper into Buddhism for a while and seen while much of it didn't necessarily conflict with my Catholicism philosophically, spiritually it became difficult to compromise in many aspects.

Also Buddhism is very complex and difficult to grasp in many ways, you almost need a PHD to begin to understand it.
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2015, 03:14:44 PM »
I engaged in some Zen meditation practices back in my martial arts days, very effective for focus and calming the mind.



As well does the Jesus Prayer

Offline WPM

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2015, 03:21:22 PM »
I know little about it

Although I think its more interwoven around folklore myth and legend.

Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Re: Orthodox Christianity and Buddhism
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2015, 07:24:09 PM »
I don't know much about Buddhism, but I know that in Japan historically there was a whole pantheon of local deities and ancestor worship mixed in, until 'Shinto' was sifted out by the state to be a separate religion.