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AncientFaith
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« on: April 25, 2006, 12:18:22 PM »

More questions on doing Matins.  I purchased the Great Horologion from HTM, but the rubrics are still a bit light, so here are some questions:

1.  It references a great and small litany.  Where can I find those?

2.  What are the plagals used for?  They are present, but don't seem to correspond to what I understand are only 8 tones.  Of course, its more likely that I'm just utterly confused.

3.  What is a sessional hymn, and where can I find it?  There are Kontakion specified for each day - is that the same thing?

4.  Is there an online source for the Menaion (print version is about $1K which is a bit steep for my personal library) or for the octoechos/paraklitiki?

5.  Where can I find the polyeleos?

6.  What is the exapostilaria for?  Its in the Horologion, but I don't find it referenced anywhere.

I think these are most of my questions.  Any assistance greatly appreciated.
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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2006, 12:49:05 PM »

More questions on doing Matins.  I purchased the Great Horologion from HTM, but the rubrics are still a bit light, so here are some questions:

1.  It references a great and small litany.  Where can I find those?

You'll find the Great Litany shortly after the beginning of most services, for instance, after the priest's opening "Blessed is the Kingdom..." in the Divine Liturgy.  The Small Litany, OTOH, you will find between the antiphons of the first part of the Divine Liturgy.

Quote
2.  What are the plagals used for?  They are present, but don't seem to correspond to what I understand are only 8 tones.  Of course, its more likely that I'm just utterly confused.

The plagals are AFAIK unique to the Byzantine practice and are therefore not to be found in Russian practice.  I believe that in the system of the Byzantine tones, Tone 5 is the plagal for Tone 1, Tone 6 the plagal for Tone 2, and Tone 8 the plagal for Tone 4.  You will need to ask an expert in Byzantine chant how specifically a plagal tone relates to its base tone.

Quote
3.  What is a sessional hymn, and where can I find it?  There are Kontakion specified for each day - is that the same thing?

I'm not entirely sure where you would find the text for a Sessional Hymn, but I do know that it is commonly prescribed, at least in the Russian practice, after the Third Ode of the Canon.  No, the Sessional Hymn is not the same as the Kontakion of the day.

Quote
4.  Is there an online source for the Menaion (print version is about $1K which is a bit steep for my personal library) or for the octoechos/paraklitiki?

You can access the Menaion texts for each day from the web site of the Holy Myrrhbears Monastery (women) in Otego, NY: http://holymyrrhbearers.com/liturgical_texts.htm.  The only thing is that the texts are good for only that day.

Regarding the Octoechos: you can download the complete Octoechos for liturgical use only from this url: http://www.archdiocese.ca/OctoechosComplete.pdf.  This combined with the Menaion should meet most of your needs for each day's specific hymnography outside of Great Lent and Paschaltide.  For Lent you also need the Lenten Triodion--I recommend the translation compiled by Archimandrite (now Bishop) Kallistos Ware and Mother Mary and published by St. Tikhon's Seminary Press.  For the season from Pascha through the Sunday of All Saints you will also need the Pentecostarion--unfortunately, no publishing agency has been printing this for the past few years AFAIK.

Quote
5.  Where can I find the polyeleos?

6.  What is the exapostilaria for?  Its in the Horologion, but I don't find it referenced anywhere.

One place where the Exapostilarion is used in the Russian practice is after the Canon and before the Praises.  I think the term means Hymn of Light, which you may also see translated in Greek as Photogogikon(sic?).

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I think these are most of my questions.  Any assistance greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2006, 12:58:59 PM by PeterTheAleut » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2006, 04:01:48 PM »

The plagals are AFAIK unique to the Byzantine practice and are therefore not to be found in Russian practice.  I believe that in the system of the Byzantine tones, Tone 5 is the plagal for Tone 1, Tone 6 the plagal for Tone 2, and Tone 8 the plagal for Tone 4.  You will need to ask an expert in Byzantine chant how specifically a plagal tone relates to its base tone.

Actually, AFAIK, it is just the WORD "plagal" that is unique to Byzantine practice.  Plagal just means something like "comes from" (probably similar to "plagiarism"), as you explained above.  So for example, if it says "sing in Plagal of Tone 2", then sing in Tone 6.  Just interpret Plagal of Tone X as Tone (X + 4).
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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2006, 05:18:37 PM »

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I think the term means Hymn of Light, which you may also see translated in Greek as Photogogikon(sic?).
We call it "svetilna".
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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2006, 05:39:02 PM »

We call it "svetilna".

Yes, I've also seen and used the term svetilen(sic?) where the term exapostilarion is normally used.  Svetilen isn't a Greek term, is it?  It actually sounds Slavic to me, since it uses the same root as the Russian name Svetlana.  (The Greek equivalent is Photini.)
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2006, 06:14:54 PM »

It is Slavonic indeed, as 90% of the Romanian liturgical terminology.
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2006, 07:50:33 PM »

3.  What is a sessional hymn, and where can I find it?
The Sessional Hymns (known as Sedalen in Slavonic) are troparia (in the generic use of the word) sung after each kathisma at Matins and after the 3rd ode of the canon.  On feasts of Polyeleos rank, a sessional hymn would be sung after the Polyeleos.  The Polyeleos (from the Greek for "many mercies") is Psalms 134 and 135, which is sung on most Sundays of the year and on holy days of certain rank (known as Polyeleos rank-consult the Menaion).  It begins with "Praise ye the name of the Lord, Alleluia!"  The sessional hymns can be found in the Octoechos and in the Menaion.  (Also in the Triodion and the Flowery Triodion.)
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« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2006, 08:25:13 PM »

6.  What is the exapostilaria for?
The Exapostilarion follows the little litany ("Again and again in peace...") after the canon of Matins.  On Sundays, the exapostilarion is "Holy is the Lord our God!" followed by the Sunday exapostilarion according to which Matins' Gospel was read (each Gospel has its own exapostilarion) plus the exapostilarion from the Menaion.
For weekday Matins, the exapostilarion is either taken from the Menaion and the Octoechos or if one is not provided in the Menaion than just from the Octoechos.
It actually gets more complicated than this.  To put together a service, on top of all the necessary books (Menaion, Triodion, Flowery Triodion, Octoechos, and Horologion) one also needs the Typikon!
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« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2006, 08:50:02 PM »

One place where the Exapostilarion is used in the Russian practice is after the Canon and before the Praises.  I think the term means Hymn of Light, which you may also see translated in Greek as Photogogikon(sic?).
Actually exapostilarion, roughly translated from Greek means "one who is sent forth" since in earlier times a cantor went to the center of the church and chanted the exapostilarion from there.
Photagogicon=Svetilen=Hymn of Light
Technically, the exapostilarion and the photagogicon are two different things and the photagogicon replaces the exapostilarion on certain days, depending on the rank of the day, and during Great Lent.  However, in common usage, the terms seem to be used synonymously.
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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2006, 07:31:08 PM »

The Exapostilarion follows the little litany ("Again and again in peace...") after the canon of Matins.  On Sundays, the exapostilarion is "Holy is the Lord our God!" followed by the Sunday exapostilarion according to which Matins' Gospel was read (each Gospel has its own exapostilarion) plus the exapostilarion from the Menaion.
For weekday Matins, the exapostilarion is either taken from the Menaion and the Octoechos or if one is not provided in the Menaion than just from the Octoechos.
It actually gets more complicated than this.  To put together a service, on top of all the necessary books (Menaion, Triodion, Flowery Triodion, Octoechos, and Horologion) one also needs the Typikon!

Aaargh.  So much work.  Well, it builds character.

Thanks to all for the assist.  As I said, the full Menaion is out of my reach, but I have downloaded the one referenced above, as well as the Octoechos.
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« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2006, 07:34:15 PM »

You can access the Menaion texts for each day from the web site of the Holy Myrrhbears Monastery (women) in Otego, NY: http://holymyrrhbearers.com/liturgical_texts.htm.  The only thing is that the texts are good for only that day.

These text lack most of what is needed for the Orthros service. They are not complete translations but rather what is used at the monastery. The canon for the saint is almost never included in this version. If you want a complete text you will either need to get the Menaion from HTM or the group in Tenn that escapes my mind.

Quote
I purchased the Great Horologion from HTM, but the rubrics are still a bit light
The reason the rubrics are light in the Horologion is because it is the book fro the reader. You need to the Typikon to put the recipe for the service together. The Horologion contains just the fixed parts for the reader, there is another book that contains all the deacon and priest parts (that is why is just references the litanies rather then giving them), and as been mentioned by others you also need the Menaion and the Paralatikia (Octochoes) to have the complete text fo the service.
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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2006, 07:45:05 PM »

Aaargh.  So much work.  Well, it builds character.

Thanks to all for the assist.  As I said, the full Menaion is out of my reach, but I have downloaded the one referenced above, as well as the Octoechos.
Don't forget, for the period between Pascha and the Sunday of All Saints, you also need the Flowery Triodion (Pentecostarion).
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« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2006, 09:36:40 PM »

These text lack most of what is needed for the Orthros service. They are not complete translations but rather what is used at the monastery. The canon for the saint is almost never included in this version. If you want a complete text you will either need to get the Menaion from HTM or the group in Tenn that escapes my mind.
The reason the rubrics are light in the Horologion is because it is the book fro the reader. You need to the Typikon to put the recipe for the service together. The Horologion contains just the fixed parts for the reader, there is another book that contains all the deacon and priest parts (that is why is just references the litanies rather then giving them), and as been mentioned by others you also need the Menaion and the Paralatikia (Octochoes) to have the complete text fo the service.

Where can I get the Typikon?

So I take it that if I'm doing the service at home, I wouldn't say the litanies?

Also, is there an online location that at least has the tone for the week published that you know of?
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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2006, 09:54:25 PM »

Where can I get the Typikon?

Just FYI: "Typikon" is a very general word. There are many Typika.

That said, there are two main types: (1) Typika that contain the order and rubrics for the Church services throughout the year; and (2) there are typika which contain the rules -- legal, customary, etc. -- of a monastery.

Now, even in the first category, there are different Typika. In fact, theoretically one could "make up" a Typikon (I have heard some say that is what the OCA has done...and I ain't talking about my fellow Greek seminarians). The point is this: You must decide which Church's Typikon you are going to use. Are you going to follow the practices of the Church of Constantinople, the Church of Greece, the Church or Moscow, of Jerusalem?

The only Typikon I have ever used is the Typikon of the Great Church of Christ, but that is not available in English. I assume the OCA has an English edition of some version of this or that Typikon, but I don't know if it is really readily available. You could always make copies of whatever Typikon your parish uses. That might not be a bad idea because, since the Liturgical services and their rubrics change every year depending on when feasts and fasts fall, one needs a new Typikon (which is really a particular application of the "Typikon") every year.
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2006, 11:44:09 PM »

So I take it that if I'm doing the service at home, I wouldn't say the litanies?

Correct.  Litanies require the activity of a priest or deacon, which make them impossible for just a reader.  The simplest thing you, the at-home reader, can do to replace the litanies in your private prayers is read "Lord, have mercy" 12 times in place of the Great Litany, 3 times in place of the Little Litany, and 40 times in place of the Evening/Morning Litany of Supplication.

In place of the Augmented Litany, you could just insert your own prayers of intercession--it is okay and actually encouraged to mix your own impromptu prayers in with the prayers of the Church when your services allow this.  I personally like to read the intercessory prayers provided in my prayer book (We Praise, Bless, and Worship: Daily Prayer for Orthodox Christians, compiled by Jan Bear and published by St. Ignatius of Antioch Press, Columbus, Ohio), but even then I will add in the names and concerns of specific people for whom I want to pray.

I hope this helps you without overwhelming you.
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« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2006, 11:49:59 AM »

Correct.  Litanies require the activity of a priest or deacon, which make them impossible for just a reader.  The simplest thing you, the at-home reader, can do to replace the litanies in your private prayers is read "Lord, have mercy" 12 times in place of the Great Litany, 3 times in place of the Little Litany, and 40 times in place of the Evening/Morning Litany of Supplication.

In place of the Augmented Litany, you could just insert your own prayers of intercession--it is okay and actually encouraged to mix your own impromptu prayers in with the prayers of the Church when your services allow this.  I personally like to read the intercessory prayers provided in my prayer book (We Praise, Bless, and Worship: Daily Prayer for Orthodox Christians, compiled by Jan Bear and published by St. Ignatius of Antioch Press, Columbus, Ohio), but even then I will add in the names and concerns of specific people for whom I want to pray.

I hope this helps you without overwhelming you.

Thanks.  This all helps quite a bit.  I'm going to use all of this to put together my own "rubric" until I get used to the prayers.  Since I don't have the Menaion, I just drop those parts that I would need to get from that.  I discovered that I can get the tone of the week from the GOA Kontakia, and the Great Horologion has most of everything else except the Kathisma, but I have the Psalter according to the seventy, so I'm good.
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« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2006, 11:54:12 AM »

So I take it that if I'm doing the service at home, I wouldn't say the litanies?

This is just my 2 cents so take it for what it is worth and I am attacking you or even expecting a responce, just giving you some things to think about...

Why are you even doing these? Did your spiritual father suggest you start reading the services at home and if he did why hasn't he given you all the tools you need? These services are require years of training to be able to put together properly. If you want to learn how to put these services together and want to do them daily go to a monestary and learn them properly. Do you know the Psalter by heart yet? In order to do these services completely you must know the Psalter and understand how it works within these service. The daily services are almost entirely from the Psalter so that is why you must first learn the Psalter before reading these services daily. That is why the monstics are required to commit the Psalter to their hearts.

To read these services by yourself in someting that is done only after much preperation. Be careful not to dive in to such a task without support because you are inviting the Devil to join you in service.
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« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2006, 01:16:49 PM »

This is just my 2 cents so take it for what it is worth and I am attacking you or even expecting a responce, just giving you some things to think about...

Why are you even doing these? Did your spiritual father suggest you start reading the services at home and if he did why hasn't he given you all the tools you need? These services are require years of training to be able to put together properly. If you want to learn how to put these services together and want to do them daily go to a monestary and learn them properly. Do you know the Psalter by heart yet? In order to do these services completely you must know the Psalter and understand how it works within these service. The daily services are almost entirely from the Psalter so that is why you must first learn the Psalter before reading these services daily. That is why the monstics are required to commit the Psalter to their hearts.

To read these services by yourself in someting that is done only after much preperation. Be careful not to dive in to such a task without support because you are inviting the Devil to join you in service.

I agree with most of what Arimethea has said in the above quote.  I guess I should now tone down what I've already provided in this thread by helping you understand the source and the context.  I speak with a good knowledge of liturgics only because I've been doing this for years for my parish church with my priest's blessing.  For someone without the level of training and experience that I have, this could be overwhelming and a source of pride--I have been warned to keep on my guard against this pride precisely because of the training I have.  I'm not now counseling you to ignore everything I've said before in this thread; I'm just joining Arimethea's warning with my own that you should approach at-home liturgics with great care and only with the guidance of your spiritual father/confessor.
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« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2006, 06:25:31 PM »

AncientFaith,
I, too, agree with most of what Arimethea and PeterTheAleut stated in the previous posts.  I started learning the order of the church services and how to put together the services when I was in my early teens from the choir director ("Prof") in my parish.  He taught me Church Slavonic and how to read the Slavonic Typikon.  He learned from his choir director in Europe.  (Much information is available today, especially with the internet.  However, not everything can be learned from reading.  Much information is passed down by word of mouth along with the books.)  Thirty something years later, I still don't know everything and would never consider myself an expert in the Typikon.
You don't list a faith in your profile but from what I can gather, you are not Orthodox.  The Orthodox Church has no equivalent of the Roman Catholic 4 volume "Liturgy of the Hours" or the Anglican "Book of Common Prayer".  So, for an individual to try to pray the Orthodox Divine Office alone is difficult, if not impossible.  I am sure it is not even encouraged.  Our Divine Office is a common office, not a private devotion.  Certainly, it is commendable to try to pray the Divine Office but even anchorites and hermits tend to pray the psalter or the Jesus prayer instead of the Divine Office when they are alone.
If you feel the need to pray the hours, a suggestion would be to obtain a copy of a little book called "A Manual of the Hours of the Orthodox Church".  It is compiled by Archimandrite Cherubin, Monastery of the Paraclete, Attica, Greece and prepared by the Holy Myrrbears Monastery in Otego, NY.  It contains excerpts from the canonical hours (generally 1 or 2 psalms and a prayer).  It is all of 4" x 6" and is convenient to carry.  I keep a copy in my brief case and at work, if I'm not in a meeting or involved with something, I will attempt to read the excerpt for the appropriate hour.  It may take no more than 5-10 minutes but as my spiritual father has said, "It is the pause that refreshes"
Good luck to you on your journey to the eternal homeland!  
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« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2006, 07:21:51 PM »

A little comic relief among all this seriousness...
More questions on doing Matins.  I purchased the Great Horologion from HTM, but the rubrics are still a bit light
The rubrics in one of the priest's service books (Orthodox) reads "And the priest goes to the customary place and says the usual thing."  This is an actual quote!   Cheesy
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« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2006, 07:45:19 PM »

I'll need to update my profile.  I am currently in between churches   Roll Eyes

Actually, we'll be Chrismated on June 4th, so the between only means we aren't Anglican any more - although I had a sudden severe flashback reading the ordination of women thread on the free-for-all forum.

At any rate, I had been praying the hours from the Anglican Breviary off and on for several years.  Last year I began being really focused with it, and I think that time with God led to the clarity required to finally move to Orthodoxy after studying it for many years.  Since starting the process, I haven't really felt comfortable continuing with the Breviary (extremely Roman volume), but missed the discipline - hence the desire to work with the Horologion.  I love reading through the Psalms, learning about the Saints, and all of the other things that go with it, especially the sense that I'm praying with the Church.  Helps balance the time I spend reading theological texts, as that is, for me, more of a source of pride than spending time doing some of the hours.  Unfortunately I do not have a formal spiritual father yet, but as I said, I'm not so much taking up something that hasn't been part of my rule, as shifting gears a bit.
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« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2006, 07:47:03 PM »

I should add that I promise to never look upon someone warning me to be careful lest spiritual pride be an issue as attacking me.  Or at least I promise to try. Smiley
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« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2006, 08:17:00 PM »

At any rate, I had been praying the hours from the Anglican Breviary off and on for several years.  Last year I began being really focused with it, and I think that time with God led to the clarity required to finally move to Orthodoxy after studying it for many years.  Since starting the process, I haven't really felt comfortable continuing with the Breviary (extremely Roman volume), but missed the discipline - hence the desire to work with the Horologion.
Why do you fell uncomfortable with it?  I am "born" Orthodox and own a copy of the Roman Catholic "Liturgy of the Hours".  I think it is quite well done and outside of certain feasts, there is nothing un-Orthodox about it.  I love to read the patristic readings (the 2nd reading) from the Office of Readings.
When I was in Italy several years ago, I was quite impressed to see quite a few young people traveling on the bus or train reading the Daily Office from it!
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Zastupnice christianov nepostydnaja, chodatajice ko Tvorcu nepreložnaja, ne prezri hr’išnych molenij hlasy, popredvari jako blahaja na pomošč nas, virno vopijuščich ti: Uskori na molitvu, i potščisja na umolenije, zastupajušči prisno Bohorodice, čtuščich t’a.
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« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2006, 12:01:08 AM »

Why do you fell uncomfortable with it?  I am "born" Orthodox and own a copy of the Roman Catholic "Liturgy of the Hours".  I think it is quite well done and outside of certain feasts, there is nothing un-Orthodox about it.  I love to read the patristic readings (the 2nd reading) from the Office of Readings.
When I was in Italy several years ago, I was quite impressed to see quite a few young people traveling on the bus or train reading the Daily Office from it!

I do like the readings from the Fathers, and I have kept my Breviary certainly.  I don't know quite how to describe it, but I guess I'm trying to immerse myself in Orthodoxy at this point.  I do have to say I love the flow of the prayers in the office.  Some day I may go back to the Breviary, or alternate.  Can't say.  Once I have a spiritual father, who knows which direction things may take.

Right now, as I imagine is the case with most converts, I feel like I've fallen in love again.  My wife and I both said that after the Holy Week services we couldn't imagine ever going back - it would feel like we were turning our back on Christ.  I know, maybe sounds a bit prideful, and I wouldn't say that to our many friends in the Anglican Church, but I was quite literally moved to tears on so many occasions.
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« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2006, 12:35:45 AM »

In the absence of a spiritual father, the best word I can offer is moderation.  Even a good thing taken to its extreme can become a thing of evil.
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« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2006, 01:19:00 AM »

I'll need to update my profile. ÂÂ I am currently in between churches ÂÂ  Roll Eyes

Actually, we'll be Chrismated on June 4th, so the between only means we aren't Anglican any more - although I had a sudden severe flashback reading the ordination of women thread on the free-for-all forum.

Just trying to make you feel more at home...if there's anything else I can do to help just let me know Wink
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« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2006, 07:14:41 AM »

Actually, we'll be Chrismated on June 4th...
As you continue your journey into the Orthodox Faith, may God grant you many, happy, holy, and blessed years!
"Mnohaja i blahaja lita!"
CR
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Zastupnice christianov nepostydnaja, chodatajice ko Tvorcu nepreložnaja, ne prezri hr’išnych molenij hlasy, popredvari jako blahaja na pomošč nas, virno vopijuščich ti: Uskori na molitvu, i potščisja na umolenije, zastupajušči prisno Bohorodice, čtuščich t’a.
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« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2006, 09:48:12 AM »

AncientFaith,

Are you aware that the Antiochian Orthodox have a Western Rite Vicariate: http://www.westernorthodox.com  

Their St. Andrew's service book contains the Morning and Evening Prayer you would be familiar with:

http://www.light-n-life.com/shopping/order_product.asp?ProductNum=STAN155  

One does not have to be Byzantine in order to be Orthodox, so says St. John Maximovitch.  And even if you are joing an Eastern Rite Orthodox parish you could use the Western Rite Morning and Evening prayer for personal use.

Fr. Deacon Lance
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My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
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