Author Topic: Why is the eagle, two-headed?  (Read 5682 times)

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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Why is the eagle, two-headed?
« Reply #45 on: June 26, 2006, 11:06:30 AM »
EA, a Coptic person I know recently told me that the COC is planning or wants to put the vows (a western idea) in the Coptic wedding ceremony. I guess that would make it nice. I've been to Greek and Coptic weddings where the procession down the aisle was with the traditional organ tune "Here comes..."  rather than a chant by chanters or clergy but never with vows. If this is true, it will be ineresting to see how things turn out.

I know in the good 'ole US, whether during or before the service, all couples must be asked whether or not they wish to be married; this is a legal requirement for the validity of the ceremony.  In the EO, the priest asks the couple before the ceremony begins.  So we don't have vows per se, but we have been forced to openly ask the couple, an action which was unnecessary in the past since one's presence at the wedding was seen as consent.
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Offline EkhristosAnesti

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Re: Why is the eagle, two-headed?
« Reply #46 on: June 26, 2006, 11:10:10 AM »
EA, a Coptic person I know recently told me that the COC is planning or wants to put the vows (a western idea) in the Coptic wedding ceremony.

I've never heard anything to that effect. Official sources would be nice. The Liturgy itself is replete with references to the husband's obligation to his wife and vice versa. The Church thus essentially makes their vows for them.

In any event, in my local parish the priest has advocated the use of written vows (which are merely signed; they're not recited audibly during the Liturgy or anything like that). I know this because i'm in fact the one who is assigned with the task of printing them. Here is a copy of the husband's vow to his wife:

"HANY, love your wife MARY-THERESE, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her, that He might sanctify and cleanse her with the washing of water by the word, that He might present her to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she should be holy and without blemish. So HANY, you ought to love MARY-THERESE your own wife as your own body; he who loves his wife loves himself. For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it just as the Lord does the church.

   Dear blessed son HANY, may the grace of the Holy Spirit strengthen you to take unto yourself your wife MARY-THERESE, in purity of heart and in sincerity. HANY, do all that is good for MARY-THERESE. Have compassion on her and always hasten to do what gladdens MARY-THERESE’S heart. Take care of MARY-THERESE, as from now on you are responsible for her after her parents; you have been crowned with heavenly crowns and confirmed by the grace of God.

   Remember HANY that if you fulfill the divine commandments, the Lord will bless you in all you do. He will grant you, HANY, blessed children and a long peaceful life: He will bless you in this life and in the hereafter."


Quote
I've been to Greek and Coptic weddings where the procession down the aisle was with the traditional organ tune "Here comes..."  rather than a chant by chanters or clergy but never with vows.


No way...that's a disgrace. I could never imagine Epouro (the traditional Coptic hymn customarily chanted during the procession) being replaced by anything else. It is chanted there for a reason, and it's such a beautiful joyful hymn anyway (one of my favourite in fact).
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Offline EkhristosAnesti

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Re: Why is the eagle, two-headed?
« Reply #47 on: June 26, 2006, 11:11:32 AM »
I know in the good 'ole US, whether during or before the service, all couples must be asked whether or not they wish to be married; this is a legal requirement for the validity of the ceremony.ÂÂ  In the EO, the priest asks the couple before the ceremony begins.ÂÂ  So we don't have vows per se, but we have been forced to openly ask the couple, an action which was unnecessary in the past since one's presence at the wedding was seen as consent.

It's the same story for Copts here in Australia. The presence of witnesses is also required for this legal procedure.
No longer an active member of this forum. Sincerest apologies to anyone who has taken offence to anything posted in youthful ignorance or negligence prior to my leaving this forum - October, 2012.

"Philosophy is the imitation by a man of what is better, according to what is possible" - St Severus