Author Topic: Yet Another Prayerbook Question  (Read 1246 times)

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Offline patricius

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Yet Another Prayerbook Question
« on: March 19, 2003, 01:06:03 AM »
Okay.  I know this must be getting old, but I am still slowly trying to figure some things out concerning the basics of daily prayer in the Eastern tradition.  So, I have a couple of questions which I hope somebody will help me with.

I have noticed that in The Hours of Prayer: A Book of Devotion from the Orthodox Brotherhood of the Virgin Mary in West Virginia that most of the hours begin with a set formula of prayers.  These seem to be "In the name of the Father...", "Glory to You, our God...", "O heavenly King...", "Holy God, Holy Mighty One...", "Glory to the Father...", "O Most Holy Trinity...", "Lord have mercy", "Glory to the Father...", "Our Father...", "Lord have mercy", Glory to the Father...", and "Come let us adore God..."  However, the "Selections from Matins for Ordinary Weekdays" does not include this, and instead goes straight into the Six Psalms.  I thought at first it may be a Sunday vs. Weekday thing, but since all the other weekday hours seem to use these that didn't really seem right.  Is there a reason why what appears to be a rather fixed formula for all other hours is completely omitted in this one?  I assume that it is not an error in the publication.

Also, I am at a loss as to which prayers are accompanied by the sign of the cross.  I gather that at all uses of "Glory to the Father..." one does so, but which others?  Does this go for any invocation of the Trinity in this manner, such as the doxology which follows the Our Father?  And what of prayers such as "Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia; glory to You, O God"?  For some reason I thought this might be one.

Thanks again for all of the help.  When I notice something like this which I don't understand I like to ask somebody.  It helps me move past the trivial and into more meaty areas.

Patrick

Offline Justin Kissel

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Re: Yet Another Prayerbook Question
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2012, 09:16:50 PM »
BUMP

As for the sign of the cross, I don't know what is official, or standard, but off the top of my head this is what I do...

- Cross for each "Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit..."
- Cross and bow for each "Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, have mercy on us..."
- Cross and bow for each "O come let us worship..."
- Cross and bow for each "Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, glory to Thee, O God..."
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Offline Benjamin the Red

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Re: Yet Another Prayerbook Question
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2012, 09:48:13 PM »
BUMP

As for the sign of the cross, I don't know what is official, or standard, but off the top of my head this is what I do...

- Cross for each "Glory to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit..."
- Cross and bow for each "Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, have mercy on us..."
- Cross and bow for each "O come let us worship..."
- Cross and bow for each "Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, glory to Thee, O God..."

This is pretty standard.

As for the opening prayers...I don't have this particular prayer book, but I have one that has similar features. What you're describing at the beginning of the regular hours is often called the "Usual Beginning" and is the standard opening for all Orthodox prayer (as the name indicates).

The selections from Matins does not have this because those are only "selections" and not the entire order of service for Matins. If one where to properly serve Daily Matins, they would begin with the usual beginning...as well as several psalms and hymns...prior to the Six Psalms. But, because it only contains selections, the entire order of service is not included in the prayer book.
"Hades is not a place, no, but a state of the soul. It begins here on earth. Just so, paradise begins in the soul of a man here in the earthly life. Here we already have contact with the divine..." -St. John, Wonderworker of Shanghai and San Francisco, Homily On the Sunday of Orthodoxy