Author Topic: 2 Corinthians 6:14  (Read 1883 times)

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Offline KostaNY

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2 Corinthians 6:14
« on: March 28, 2006, 06:55:25 PM »
2 Corinthians 6:14 Be ye not equally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness?

Now when I look at the following scripture I know it doesn't mean to isolate ourselves from unbelievers, I know we are supposed to witness to all, and I know it doesn't mean about not having a spouse as an unbeliever because Paul tells us about that in 1 Corinthians 7:12-13. (if you were with them before you heard the gospel).Would you agree this would have to do with our close personal relationships and business relationships we have with unbelievers. For example would you have a business partership with a unbeliever ? I think Paul was giving us this warning because obviously the unbeliever would possibly weaken our faith and even compromise our Christian standards. So in light of this question would you form a close personal relationship with an unbeliever  or/and a business partnership with a unbeliever ?

Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: 2 Corinthians 6:14
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2006, 07:41:06 PM »
2 Corinthians 6:14 Be ye not equally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness?

Now when I look at the following scripture I know it doesn't mean to isolate ourselves from unbelievers, I know we are supposed to witness to all, and I know it doesn't mean about not having a spouse as an unbeliever because Paul tells us about that in 1 Corinthians 7:12-13. (if you were with them before you heard the gospel).Would you agree this would have to do with our close personal relationships and business relationships we have with unbelievers. For example would you have a business partership with a unbeliever ? I think Paul was giving us this warning because obviously the unbeliever would possibly weaken our faith and even compromise our Christian standards. So in light of this question would you form a close personal relationship with an unbeliever  or/and a business partnership with a unbeliever ?

One who is already a practicing Christian should not marry someone who is not, hence the Church's very strict rules forbidding the marriage of an Orthodox Christian to someone who has not been baptized--I'm sure some of the more traditionalist of priests would even refuse to marry an Orthodox Christian to another Christian who's not Orthodox.

Otherwise, I see in your post above that you have a good understanding of the reason behind St. Paul's warning.  I think the answer to your question depends on the strength of your own Christian faith.  Is your faith strong enough that your non-Christian friend won't drag you into apostasy or immorality?  Then I say go ahead and befriend him or enter into a business relationship with him.  If your faith is not strong enough to resist this temptation, then you may need to avoid such a relationship and work on growing more mature in your faith.  I'm sorry that I can't give you a more definitive answer than this.
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Offline KostaNY

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Re: 2 Corinthians 6:14
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2006, 08:18:49 PM »
One who is already a practicing Christian should not marry someone who is not, hence the Church's very strict rules forbidding the marriage of an Orthodox Christian to someone who has not been baptized--I'm sure some of the more traditionalist of priests would even refuse to marry an Orthodox Christian to another Christian who's not Orthodox.

Otherwise, I see in your post above that you have a good understanding of the reason behind St. Paul's warning.  I think the answer to your question depends on the strength of your own Christian faith.  Is your faith strong enough that your non-Christian friend won't drag you into apostasy or immorality?  Then I say go ahead and befriend him or enter into a business relationship with him.  If your faith is not strong enough to resist this temptation, then you may need to avoid such a relationship and work on growing more mature in your faith.  I'm sorry that I can't give you a more definitive answer than this.

I respect what your saying, and I do agree with you up to a certain point. You wrote that if one had strong enough faith that a unbeliever wouldn't cause one to turn to apostasy or immorality. Yes I can kind of agree there, but who had more faith then Apostle Paul ? And he was the one giving this warning, so if he felt that in his own walk that he would stray away from all unbelievers in any type of personal/business relationship then surely I would have to really consider doing the same. No matter how strong my faith is, because even if it doesn't lead one to apostasy or immorality, it can do other harmful things to our faith, even if it means making our faith weaker in other areas that might not seem to serious. Either way it can't have a positive influence on any part of your faith. There are situations in life where you can't avoid this though, such as workplace, school, etc. So theres a lot of different ways to look at this.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2006, 08:24:34 PM by KostaNY »

Offline Fr. George

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Re: 2 Corinthians 6:14
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2006, 08:53:42 PM »
I don't know how cut-and-dry this is; St. Paul doesn't say to not associate with unbelievers, because then he would promote the breaking of marriage between a spouse who becomes a Christian with their other who is not - but instead, he says that if one becomes a believer, that they should stay together (if the non-believer consents) because the believer will be a benefit to the other.  He does have a constant consciousness that Christians are called to be beacons to the non-believers.

But, on the flip side, I can also see why he would not want you to, say, be in a business partnership with a non-believer, partially for the reasons stated above, and partially because the business may have practices not befitting a CHristian business.. thus, your personal faith isn't affected, but the actions done on behalf of a business you're involved in are, and this will affect your standing with the community.

In the end, it would be nice to follow these warnings to the strictest, but because we're left with very few situations where we can actually follow the advise, our goal should be dealing with reality where it is at - i.e. living, socializing, and working in a world where we are very close to those whose faith is in another place.
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Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: 2 Corinthians 6:14
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2006, 02:00:14 AM »
But, on the flip side, I can also see why he would not want you to, say, be in a business partnership with a non-believer, partially for the reasons stated above, and partially because the business may have practices not befitting a CHristian business.. thus, your personal faith isn't affected, but the actions done on behalf of a business you're involved in are, and this will affect your standing with the community.


This reminds me of something.  At the time I discovered Orthodoxy I was in a business partnership with a group of entrepreneurs.  After I was chrismated and began to mature in my Orthodox faith, I grew increasingly uncomfortable with what I was being taught by other successful associates in my business.  The philosophy was very strongly "new age," Think and Grow Rich, self-esteem type stuff that is totally incompatible with the Orthodox view of the human person.  (Is it any surprise that a lot of my business associates were Mormon, since this "new age" philosophy is so much a part of Mormon doctrine?)  Nobody in the Church told me I had to do this; I eventually just came to the conclusion that I needed to quit my business efforts in order to get away from the heresies I was being taught so that I could concentrate more energy on deepening my Orthodox faith.  I don't regret the decision one bit!

(FYI, Think and Grow Rich is the title of a book on success philosophy and motivation written in 1937 by Napoleon Hill.  I don't know if the following quote is an actual citation from the book, but it fits the theme of the book and the philosophy of my former business perfectly.  "Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.")
« Last Edit: March 29, 2006, 02:07:24 AM by PeterTheAleut »
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