Author Topic: Pointy Hats  (Read 782 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Justinian

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 176
Pointy Hats
« on: February 06, 2006, 08:28:19 PM »
Greetings!

I've been pondering about this. The pointed hats they use in the Western Church such as in the Roman and Anglican hierarchy, are they an innovation or has the western church always used this clerical attire, even in Pre-Schism days. Ive seen some icons of the Council of Nicea, and Blessed Augustine of Hippo, and Saint Patrick, all of them shown wearing pointed hats, not pillar hats like as it is in the Eastern Church. These are relatively recent icons though and the one I have seen of these subjects further back, show them wearing nothing.


In XC,
Justinian
"All this indignation have I hurled, At the pretending part of the proud world. Who, swollen with selfish vanity devise: false freedoms, holy cheats, and formal lies, Over their fellow slaves to tyrannize." - John Wilmot

Offline Anastasios

  • Webdespota
  • Administrator
  • Merarches
  • *******
  • Posts: 10,496
  • Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina
    • AnastasiosHudson.com
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Re: Pointy Hats
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2006, 08:30:07 PM »
People didn't even wear clerical hats until relatively late.  As a rule, I'd assume "divergent practice" before I assumed "innovation" in matters liturgical.

Anastasios
Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism and may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.

Offline theodore

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 194
Re: Pointy Hats
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2006, 10:31:27 PM »
These are relatively recent icons though and the one I have seen of these subjects further back, show them wearing nothing.

In XC,
Justinian
I would disagree with this statement.  The subjects of those early icons weren't shown wearing nothing, but normally were dipicted with figleaves.  Nudity just isn't that common in modern iconography.   ;D