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Author Topic: Homeschool VS Public School  (Read 67339 times) Average Rating: 1
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« Reply #450 on: May 06, 2013, 02:01:08 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?
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« Reply #451 on: May 06, 2013, 02:09:16 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
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« Reply #452 on: May 06, 2013, 06:08:50 PM »

My father stopped helping me in Maths when I was 10, my mother - when I was 13.
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« Reply #453 on: May 06, 2013, 06:44:28 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.
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« Reply #454 on: May 09, 2013, 04:06:02 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.

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« Reply #455 on: May 09, 2013, 05:15:14 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
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« Reply #456 on: May 09, 2013, 05:16:15 PM »

My father stopped helping me in Maths when I was 10, my mother - when I was 13.

I continued studying math with my son, even taking advanced college level courses with him.

In fact, the college counselors encouraged me to gain my MA degree to inspire my son to get his PhD.
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« Reply #457 on: May 09, 2013, 05:29:17 PM »

I started helping my parents with math in regards to their bills and taxes when I was 14, and I've barely made it through math my entire life.
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« Reply #458 on: May 09, 2013, 05:46:07 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



It would be nice to see a homeschool co-op of some sort.  Maybe have a few families get together and either split up teaching different classes, or let your children be taught by a parent already homeschooling their own kids (with proper compensation).  Unfortunately, I think there are licensing issues that come up when you are teaching another person's child. 
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« Reply #459 on: May 09, 2013, 06:03:09 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.
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« Reply #460 on: May 09, 2013, 06:15:25 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.
better than going to public school to aim for the low class.
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« Reply #461 on: May 09, 2013, 06:16:08 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
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« Reply #462 on: May 09, 2013, 09:10:40 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.
Like most people?  Didn't know that was a bad thing.
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« Reply #463 on: May 09, 2013, 09:11:42 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.
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« Reply #464 on: May 09, 2013, 10:13:06 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.
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« Reply #465 on: May 09, 2013, 10:14:16 PM »

Teaching Textbooks has some great math programs.
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« Reply #466 on: May 10, 2013, 03:22:25 AM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.
I'm one of those people who see the problem of X over Y divided by Z squared over 2 and come up with the answer of Cheescake.
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« Reply #467 on: May 10, 2013, 04:16:57 AM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.

It's not a "class" issue, it's an issue with priorities. The vast majority of people CAN if they wanted to. I know there are those who flat out can't, but they're the exception, not the rule. My husband and I have made the decision that I will stay home and educate our children. We live within our means on one income. It doesn't mean it's easy. But our family, our children's education, spiritual development, and future, are all more important than that second income. We have made a very intentional decision, and many of our homeschooling friends have done the same.

Who doesn't sacrifice for their children?

Aside from the fact that scores across the board are the same with homeschoolers no matter if their parents spent any money on curriculum etc or thousands.

Oh, and there are no "classes," we do not live in India. We are citizens of our countries and have the same opportunities and freedoms as everyone else.
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« Reply #468 on: May 10, 2013, 06:19:21 AM »

Oh, and there are no "classes," we do not live in India. We are citizens of our countries and have the same opportunities and freedoms as everyone else.

Cheesy
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« Reply #469 on: May 10, 2013, 09:49:02 AM »

I was a teacher for ten years, teaching in junior high, high school and college.  I taught kids who had been home schooled and I can say that there were usually only two kinds of kids:  those who were home schooled very well and those who were home schooled HORRIBLY.  I never saw too much in between.  I really think it all comes down to the parents.  If the parents have a passion for learning and education and can explain things at their child's level, it tends to work very well.  But if the home school teacher (like this one scatter brained mother I knew personally) means well, but is unorganized, unable to focus, and uninformed about what should even be included in an educational curriculum, it does not tend to turn out well. I have also noticed that even the best home schooling parents often decide to send their children to public high school when the curriculum and subject matter become too labor-intensive or simply too difficult for the parents.  For example, my public high school taught French, Spanish, German and Russian.  I wanted to learn German and French.  How would I have learned those languages if my parents were home schooling me since my parents only spoke English?  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement English.  My parents, even though they were high school graduates (and that's ALL you have to be to home school your kids in South Carolina, being a college graduate is NOT required here), knew NOTHING about the intricacies of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats or Dostoevsky, all of which I thoroughly enjoyed.  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement U.S. History and I did and while my parents might have been able to teach me the mere facts of U.S. history, I sincerely doubt that they could have done it as well as Mr. Knighton did.  Mr. Knighton's class was a sheer joy because he taught us how to think critically, how to debate in a logical and respectful manner and how to write and argue persuasively.  

I know there are bad teachers out there because I saw them when I taught.  But I also remember the great public school teachers I had that inspired me, and some of my colleagues when I taught who were so outstanding.  Its kind of sad that the home schooled kids miss those great public school teachers.  Nevertheless, I understand why parents home school and if I were in a bad school district, I might consider it myself if I had children, at least for the primary grades.
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« Reply #470 on: May 10, 2013, 11:07:44 AM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.
I'm one of those people who see the problem of X over Y divided by Z squared over 2 and come up with the answer of Cheescake.

 Cheesy  Yeah, that's me with most geometry.  Now I see (L x W x H) x Coefficient x ΔT = Figure it out if you want to have a pay check!
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« Reply #471 on: May 10, 2013, 11:14:01 AM »

I was a teacher for ten years, teaching in junior high, high school and college.  I taught kids who had been home schooled and I can say that there were usually only two kinds of kids:  those who were home schooled very well and those who were home schooled HORRIBLY.  I never saw too much in between.  I really think it all comes down to the parents.  If the parents have a passion for learning and education and can explain things at their child's level, it tends to work very well.  But if the home school teacher (like this one scatter brained mother I knew personally) means well, but is unorganized, unable to focus, and uninformed about what should even be included in an educational curriculum, it does not tend to turn out well. I have also noticed that even the best home schooling parents often decide to send their children to public high school when the curriculum and subject matter become too labor-intensive or simply too difficult for the parents.  For example, my public high school taught French, Spanish, German and Russian.  I wanted to learn German and French.  How would I have learned those languages if my parents were home schooling me since my parents only spoke English?  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement English.  My parents, even though they were high school graduates (and that's ALL you have to be to home school your kids in South Carolina, being a college graduate is NOT required here), knew NOTHING about the intricacies of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats or Dostoevsky, all of which I thoroughly enjoyed.  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement U.S. History and I did and while my parents might have been able to teach me the mere facts of U.S. history, I sincerely doubt that they could have done it as well as Mr. Knighton did.  Mr. Knighton's class was a sheer joy because he taught us how to think critically, how to debate in a logical and respectful manner and how to write and argue persuasively.  

I know there are bad teachers out there because I saw them when I taught.  But I also remember the great public school teachers I had that inspired me, and some of my colleagues when I taught who were so outstanding.  Its kind of sad that the home schooled kids miss those great public school teachers.  Nevertheless, I understand why parents home school and if I were in a bad school district, I might consider it myself if I had children, at least for the primary grades.

You bring up a lot of good points.  The advantage of homeschooling though is that sometimes all it takes is one crappy teacher to ruin a student for life.  A parent is capable of doing the same thing but they will never deal with the systemic issue of a teacher having 180 students a year (30 class size x 6 periods) and many of them having different learning methods.  I was lucky in that I was very adaptable.  My brother is possible dyslexic (not diagnosed) and had a few crappy teachers in a row.  He could get by with a good teacher, but he resisted the best efforts of those who he had no respect for. 

But I do hear what you are saying.  I can think of three high school teachers and four college professors who really influenced my time in school and the way I think today.  I never had a truly "bad" teacher, but that is due to my adaptability.  My brother had some of the same teachers I did and had problems all throughout high school.
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« Reply #472 on: May 10, 2013, 12:39:41 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.

It's not a "class" issue, it's an issue with priorities. The vast majority of people CAN if they wanted to. I know there are those who flat out can't, but they're the exception, not the rule. My husband and I have made the decision that I will stay home and educate our children. We live within our means on one income. It doesn't mean it's easy. But our family, our children's education, spiritual development, and future, are all more important than that second income. We have made a very intentional decision, and many of our homeschooling friends have done the same.

Who doesn't sacrifice for their children?

Aside from the fact that scores across the board are the same with homeschoolers no matter if their parents spent any money on curriculum etc or thousands.

Oh, and there are no "classes," we do not live in India. We are citizens of our countries and have the same opportunities and freedoms as everyone else.
If I responded to this thoroughly we'd veer into politics. But to say there are no classes here in America or the so-called "free world" reveals a depth of naivete that's astounding. And in the city, at least, you can't really live on a single income and homeschool your children  unless that single income already puts you in the upper middle class echelons. At least in urban areas-don't know about the farms etc-homeschooling is quite an (upper) middle-class pastime.
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« Reply #473 on: May 10, 2013, 01:05:53 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Or able. To stay home  . IMO this whole home school thing is so middle class.

It's not a "class" issue, it's an issue with priorities. The vast majority of people CAN if they wanted to. I know there are those who flat out can't, but they're the exception, not the rule. My husband and I have made the decision that I will stay home and educate our children. We live within our means on one income. It doesn't mean it's easy. But our family, our children's education, spiritual development, and future, are all more important than that second income. We have made a very intentional decision, and many of our homeschooling friends have done the same.

Who doesn't sacrifice for their children?

Aside from the fact that scores across the board are the same with homeschoolers no matter if their parents spent any money on curriculum etc or thousands.

Oh, and there are no "classes," we do not live in India. We are citizens of our countries and have the same opportunities and freedoms as everyone else.
If I responded to this thoroughly we'd veer into politics. But to say there are no classes here in America or the so-called "free world" reveals a depth of naivete that's astounding. And in the city, at least, you can't really live on a single income and homeschool your children  unless that single income already puts you in the upper middle class echelons. At least in urban areas-don't know about the farms etc-homeschooling is quite an (upper) middle-class pastime.
Wrong again.  I know plenty of people who don't qualify for "(upper) middle-class" status.  And they live in the city.  It is simply a process of elimination, btw: the upper class have money to send them to private schools, and the lower classes do not have the education to do it.

But you are right: the US most definitely has classes, despite how much denial of that reality American self perception indulges in.
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« Reply #474 on: May 10, 2013, 01:08:05 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.
do me a favor and post it on my FB wall.  I've never seen it.
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« Reply #475 on: May 10, 2013, 01:18:02 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue
Cheesy

It is funny, but there is a lot of truth here.  Parents who take the job seriously often do a much, much better job of teaching than a teacher.  Not only are they more invested in the child’s education, there is more one on one time, less stress, almost no peer pressure, etc.  All of the distractions are removed.  Also, the material is created in a way any parent should be able to teach.  It is no different than your average, run of the mill, poorly prepared public school teacher.  Usually better.  Additionally, there are social support groups for homeschooled kids and if one parent is struggling in a subject, another can step in a help.

Bonus: Parents who do not know math quickly learn to love it for the sake of their children.
that's overstated a bit.
I don't think I will ever love math, but I appreciate it.

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.
do me a favor and post it on my FB wall.  I've never seen it.

Sent you a friend request.
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« Reply #476 on: May 10, 2013, 03:53:39 PM »

Yeah.  I keep on seeing these facebook "shares" saying 'yet another day where I didn't use algebra'.  I use it most days.

It's kinda fashionable here to confess one is terrible at Maths/Science. I can't really understand it.

I use algebra on daily basis too.
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« Reply #477 on: May 10, 2013, 04:00:07 PM »

It would be impossible for me to teach maths or science to my son. Not only I have accumulated 24 years' worth of rust, but also I was taught in another language. I'd need classes myself just to understand his books, probably for anything Year 4 and up.

Even if I weren't sure that being his teacher as well as his mother would drive me stark raving mad. Because I am sure.

I'm just glad the public school system over here is really good.
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« Reply #478 on: May 10, 2013, 08:57:16 PM »

There certainly are bad home school parents, I too have seen a few; however, most I have met took the job seriously.  Some even went as far as getting chalk boards and turning a bedroom into a class room with desks, posters, a library, etc.  People I have meet who were homeschooled properly talk happily of support groups, sports, trips, and learning from a variety of other adults.  As I stated, if done the correct way, it is a great way to educate your child away from the negative influences of the public system of bad parents teaching their kids garbage, teachers who don’t care, indoctrination, and so on.
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« Reply #479 on: May 10, 2013, 10:02:36 PM »

How would you teach them the more difficult things - like advanced chemistry and physics?

Same way the public schools do - not very well.   Tongue

Haha, you are right.  Smiley

There are also fully computerized courses for Physics, Chemistry, etc.
https://www.aophomeschooling.com/product/12sos1100s-3956
You can find them used for $30
Physics as well.

The computer has video teachings, learning games, lots of teacher commentary... Lots of multimedia.  Along with books, tests, worksheets, etc.

We don't use this curriculum now... But when it goes over the head (or at least where I don't want to re-learn) it's as simple as installing software...  But that is a good question Cyrillic.

Also later, many homeschooled children go to community colleges & universities.
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« Reply #480 on: May 10, 2013, 10:05:16 PM »

I wish all parents would homeschool their children. Or, at least, the parents who are capable of doing so, which is nearly all of them. One must be, for example, able to read.



Me too my friend....

I'd love to see it happen.  I've seen some neat stuff too where some neighbors who were friends both homeschooled and the mothers teamed up 3 days a week.  Smiley

Money is often an issue though, as many families "think" they need a dual income.  We sacrificed that in order to homeschool.   I'd live in an RV before I'd send them to public school if I had to. (God please don't test me on this)  LOL
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« Reply #481 on: May 10, 2013, 10:16:58 PM »

I once spoke to someone who used a program which was designed for kids who learned through practical application techniques rather than the traditional “I talk, you listen” method employed by most schools.  He said his son went from being two years behind other students to being a year or so ahead within the first year they began the program.  There appears to be a lot of flexibility out there to adjust subjects for your kids.  He said it is easy to interchange from one program to another depending on the subject and how the child learns.
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« Reply #482 on: May 10, 2013, 10:17:16 PM »

I was a teacher for ten years, teaching in junior high, high school and college.  I taught kids who had been home schooled and I can say that there were usually only two kinds of kids:  those who were home schooled very well and those who were home schooled HORRIBLY.  I never saw too much in between.  I really think it all comes down to the parents.  If the parents have a passion for learning and education and can explain things at their child's level, it tends to work very well.  But if the home school teacher (like this one scatter brained mother I knew personally) means well, but is unorganized, unable to focus, and uninformed about what should even be included in an educational curriculum, it does not tend to turn out well. I have also noticed that even the best home schooling parents often decide to send their children to public high school when the curriculum and subject matter become too labor-intensive or simply too difficult for the parents.  For example, my public high school taught French, Spanish, German and Russian.  I wanted to learn German and French.  How would I have learned those languages if my parents were home schooling me since my parents only spoke English?  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement English.  My parents, even though they were high school graduates (and that's ALL you have to be to home school your kids in South Carolina, being a college graduate is NOT required here), knew NOTHING about the intricacies of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, James Joyce, William Butler Yeats or Dostoevsky, all of which I thoroughly enjoyed.  I also wanted to take Advanced Placement U.S. History and I did and while my parents might have been able to teach me the mere facts of U.S. history, I sincerely doubt that they could have done it as well as Mr. Knighton did.  Mr. Knighton's class was a sheer joy because he taught us how to think critically, how to debate in a logical and respectful manner and how to write and argue persuasively.  

I know there are bad teachers out there because I saw them when I taught.  But I also remember the great public school teachers I had that inspired me, and some of my colleagues when I taught who were so outstanding.  Its kind of sad that the home schooled kids miss those great public school teachers.  Nevertheless, I understand why parents home school and if I were in a bad school district, I might consider it myself if I had children, at least for the primary grades.

I agree with you.

There are some parents who even do "unschooling" which is "just letting your child learn by watching you".  No curriculum.... I would be AGAINST that.

My family uses Rod & Staff curriculum.  It ends at 8th grade officially, but has subject matter until 10th grade.   AFTER that we are going to a more computer based curriculum.

However, I am downright impressed with Rod & Staff.  It teaches things that WE NEVER learned in regular school (I went to public school).

For instance, there is an entire course on "How to construct a home from the ground up, plumbing, insulation, wiring, and installing appliances & Cabinets".   It gets VERY detailed.  Even down to putting in the disposal in the sink.

I can't even say how much this would have helped me when I was 18 years old, because I didn't know ANYTHING.  Not good with home repairs or cooking etc.

Some homeschooled children learn based in "practicality" and "life skills", vs. things like Julius Caesar.  Some may clash with nothing but curriculum.... Some may not.

My sons for sure WOULD NOT like sitting still in a classroom all day.  But they are both smart, read great, know math wonderfully.... My younger son (8 years old) has great penmanship (better than mine).  My older son... well there is room for improvement on his penmanship.  Still though, they both do well in the books but SHINE with tools.... I've never seen anything like it.

I can buy a faucet from home depot come back, realize I forgot a tractor oil filter at Autozone, come back and my 11 year old installed the faucet up under the sink.  No leaks.  Plumbers taped perfectly.  Nice & tight.    


But you are right, there are some children where I don't agree with the way their parent's home school... But I view that as their choice.

Some parents emphasize life skills much more than books, some books more than life skills.  It varies.

Point being, so long as they are learning enriching things, that's the point of an education.  "Learn to think for themselves" and "find answers to questions".   After you "give them" that drive of curiosity, you can pretty much sit back....

Except you can't sit back for Algebra with my Daughter....  Shocked  Poor child.
I gave her a break one day from it and I came in to two fresh loaves of bread and 3 pies.  Bribery!
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« Reply #483 on: May 10, 2013, 10:20:52 PM »

It would be impossible for me to teach maths or science to my son. Not only I have accumulated 24 years' worth of rust, but also I was taught in another language. I'd need classes myself just to understand his books, probably for anything Year 4 and up.

Even if I weren't sure that being his teacher as well as his mother would drive me stark raving mad. Because I am sure.

I'm just glad the public school system over here is really good.

I can't stand English or Grammar with a passion.  (probably obvious LOL) I heavily dislike reading novels too.

But my wife loves that stuff.  She's the primary teacher for most things in their school.

I'm way more geared towards Math & Science and can help out sometimes when my daughter has a question.
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« Reply #484 on: May 10, 2013, 10:25:48 PM »

I once spoke to someone who used a program which was designed for kids who learned through practical application techniques rather than the traditional “I talk, you listen” method employed by most schools.  He said his son went from being two years behind other students to being a year or so ahead within the first year they began the program.  There appears to be a lot of flexibility out there to adjust subjects for your kids.  He said it is easy to interchange from one program to another depending on the subject and how the child learns.

Absolutely.

You can gear their learning around things they are interested in.   For instance, my son likes to "clear cactus" with a Machete.   If he's frustrated on a Math problem, we can give him a problem talking about the Machete "chopping" cactus.

(How many thorns are left, how many pieces of cactus now, fractions of cactus, angle of slice, how fast did the machete go, etc.)
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« Reply #485 on: May 10, 2013, 10:58:36 PM »

In America, open prayer is NOT permitted.
Quote
It is even permissible for a teacher to lead prayer provided it is in a voluntary setting. i.e. after school clubs.
Quote
Actually this is not correct.  Open prayer led by any teacher is not permitted.

Obviously you are an expert on this yeshuaisiam. I am not. However, given how the sentence is written, you statement is hard to believe. I would appreciate it if you could show me the law that prevents teachers from leading prayers in an after school setting as part of a school club. There is no indication that this is occurring at the school as far as I can tell but I would think that is OK as well.



Here's a story from today:
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/highschool-prep-rally/texas-teen-points-heavens-gets-4-100-relay-181303156.html

From the ADL web site: General Rule: Organized prayer in the public school setting, whether in the classroom or at a school-sponsored event, is unconstitutional. The only type of prayer that is constitutionally permissible is private, voluntary student prayer that does not interfere with the school's educational mission.

Prayer led by teachers in public school is considered "unconstitutional".   There have been teachers fired for it.

I quoted many verses in scripture above showing that God obviously wants our children to be raised overflowing with his words & the words of the scriptures.  Also the scriptures point to parents a lot, in training them.

Your web citation appears to be a deflection. The original report, http://www.wfaa.com/news/205794321.html, has a different emphasis from what you are trying to convey:
Quote
As he was crossing the finish line, Derrick Hayes pointed up to the sky. His father believes he was giving thanks in a gesture to God.

“It was a reaction,” father KC Hayes said. “I mean you’re brought up your whole life that God gives you good things, you’re blessed.”

Columbus ISD Superintendent Robert O’Connor said the team had won the race by seven yards. It was their fastest race of the year.

Though O’Connor cannot say why the student pointed, he says it was against the rules that govern high school sports. The rules state there can be no excessive act of celebration, which includes raising the hands.

I personally dislike expressions of triumphalism, it is nice to see policies that reinforce the virtues of humility.
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« Reply #486 on: May 11, 2013, 12:42:23 AM »


Except you can't sit back for Algebra with my Daughter....  Shocked  Poor child.
I gave her a break one day from it and I came in to two fresh loaves of bread and 3 pies.  Bribery!

Haha!

Regarding upper level studies, I know of several families with middle and high school aged children who are utilizing the many, MANY free video courses offered by different universities. Standford being the stand out in my mind, they seem to have a lot. They also utilize CLEP tests as high school tests, so essentially it's a dual credit course.

The free online video courses offered by schools have been spoken about as a new approach to higher education. Making it accessable and affordable to more people. It seems to me thaat homeschooling families are generally on the cutting edge of educational progress like this. They use every available tool to ensure the success of their children.

 Everyone can play the "what if" game. But, the fact remains that an insignificant portion of homeschooling parents do a poor job of educating. The Government schools have a huge portion of failure. Just because some people drive drunk, doesn't mean everyone needs to be punished by having driving revoked. The same goes for homeschooling parents. Just sayin'

Let me dig up some links for the university classes, it's a great option for adults who just want to learn. You never have to sit exams, just saok it in.
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« Reply #487 on: May 11, 2013, 12:50:19 AM »

Here you go. I found a few courses I didn't know were being offered, I'm pretty excited about it. Smiley

http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses

http://www.onlinecourses.com/lectures/

http://www.onlinecourses.com/

http://oyc.yale.edu/

http://www.jimmyr.com/blog/1_Top_10_Universities_With_Free_Courses_Online.php

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/sites-free-video-lectures-top-colleges/
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« Reply #488 on: May 11, 2013, 12:58:38 AM »


Except you can't sit back for Algebra with my Daughter....  Shocked  Poor child.
I gave her a break one day from it and I came in to two fresh loaves of bread and 3 pies.  Bribery!

Haha!

Regarding upper level studies, I know of several families with middle and high school aged children who are utilizing the many, MANY free video courses offered by different universities. Standford being the stand out in my mind, they seem to have a lot. They also utilize CLEP tests as high school tests, so essentially it's a dual credit course.

The free online video courses offered by schools have been spoken about as a new approach to higher education. Making it accessable and affordable to more people. It seems to me thaat homeschooling families are generally on the cutting edge of educational progress like this. They use every available tool to ensure the success of their children.

 Everyone can play the "what if" game. But, the fact remains that an insignificant portion of homeschooling parents do a poor job of educating. The Government schools have a huge portion of failure. Just because some people drive drunk, doesn't mean everyone needs to be punished by having driving revoked. The same goes for homeschooling parents. Just sayin'

Let me dig up some links for the university classes, it's a great option for adults who just want to learn. You never have to sit exams, just saok it in.

Many do use cutting edge methods of education, and many also "root back", to old forms of education.  I know of a family using the McGuffey readers (like they did on Little House on the Prairie).   Their children are doing very well!  These folks also bring them on field trips a lot.   It is an interesting approach that we don't use, but it's working!

After doing this for so many years and knowing so many involved with homeschool, I can safely say "so long as the parent truly cares about educating their child and are involved, they will do well".   Honestly, it doesn't always matter the method so long as they pursue education.

It's the parents who just say "I'm homeschooling", buy one book and never sit down with their children and watch T.V. all day who give the worst name to homeschooling.  There are some who are "middle of the road" I would say.  Most however are actively involved in the educational process.
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« Reply #489 on: May 11, 2013, 12:59:14 AM »


Awesome.  Thank you!
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« Reply #490 on: May 11, 2013, 01:22:19 AM »

One family I had in mind who utilize the online university courses taught all of their children with the McGuffy reader! They're an eclectic bunch. The mother has used the Robinson curriculum with amazing success, and credits the self teaching method as the reason her children in college are pulling 4.0's every semester. Her children are (so far) in the nursing, engineering, journalism, and architecture programs at their respective schools.

We're more old school in our approach, but even for my children who end up being bound for the skilled trades, I think the online college classes can be invaluable.

Can you direct me towards the "How to construct a home from the ground up, plumbing, insulation, wiring, and installing appliances & Cabinets" course from Rod and Staff, I think my youngest brother would gain so much from this.
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« Reply #491 on: May 11, 2013, 01:33:46 AM »

After doing this for so many years and knowing so many involved with homeschool, I can safely say "so long as the parent truly cares about educating their child and are involved, they will do well".   Honestly, it doesn't always matter the method so long as they pursue education.

It's the parents who just say "I'm homeschooling", buy one book and never sit down with their children and watch T.V. all day who give the worst name to homeschooling.  There are some who are "middle of the road" I would say.  Most however are actively involved in the educational process.

I agree. I hate hearing how homeschooling is "the easy way out" or that HSing parents are "lazy." You know what? Shoving that kid on a bus in the morning, and possibly taking advantage of free before school and after school programs that bus the kids there and back is a whole lot easier than HSing. All you HAVE to do is get 'em up and dressed (until they're able to do it themselves), then get 'em fed and to bed, rinse repeat. That sounds a lot easier than educating them, preparing all of their meals, and fostering a strong spiritual and moral environment for them. Even if a "HS" parent does sit and watch TV, they still don't get the free babysitting.

Before anyone gets offended and jumps down my throat, I'm not saying all families who public school do that, or that the majority do. I'm saying by taking advantage of the system, a parent can very easily check out of parenthood. If I were a lazy, self-centered bum who didn't want to be bothered by my kids, that would be my game plan.

I know it works, that's how I was raised from middle school (after my parents divorced and didn't want to be parents anymore) until high school graduation.
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« Reply #492 on: May 11, 2013, 08:12:46 PM »

After doing this for so many years and knowing so many involved with homeschool, I can safely say "so long as the parent truly cares about educating their child and are involved, they will do well".   Honestly, it doesn't always matter the method so long as they pursue education.

It's the parents who just say "I'm homeschooling", buy one book and never sit down with their children and watch T.V. all day who give the worst name to homeschooling.  There are some who are "middle of the road" I would say.  Most however are actively involved in the educational process.

I agree. I hate hearing how homeschooling is "the easy way out" or that HSing parents are "lazy." You know what? Shoving that kid on a bus in the morning, and possibly taking advantage of free before school and after school programs that bus the kids there and back is a whole lot easier than HSing. All you HAVE to do is get 'em up and dressed (until they're able to do it themselves), then get 'em fed and to bed, rinse repeat. That sounds a lot easier than educating them, preparing all of their meals, and fostering a strong spiritual and moral environment for them. Even if a "HS" parent does sit and watch TV, they still don't get the free babysitting.

Before anyone gets offended and jumps down my throat, I'm not saying all families who public school do that, or that the majority do. I'm saying by taking advantage of the system, a parent can very easily check out of parenthood. If I were a lazy, self-centered bum who didn't want to be bothered by my kids, that would be my game plan.

I know it works, that's how I was raised from middle school (after my parents divorced and didn't want to be parents anymore) until high school graduation.

Very true.  Also the consideration that all dishes, toilet flushes, paper scraps & other messes are all at home.  If you child walks somewhere, they are on your carpet/floors.  It wears on your paint, flooring, etc., more.  I know it sounds kind of funky, but a home is not a commercial building.  Scuffs happen and 100% is in your home.  Dropped food for instance, on your floor, - if stuck on foot/shoe, on your carpet.  At school you don't deal with stuff like this.

Educational videos, all funded by parents.  TV & electricity all at your expense.

Homeschooling is absolutely not lazy or cheap.  It can be inexpensive if you use your mind and get used curriculum, but costs do go up, as well as you lose a lot of "worldly freedom" as a parent.
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« Reply #493 on: May 11, 2013, 09:04:54 PM »

If I were home-schooled I would not be posting here. I am indebted to public education.
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« Reply #494 on: May 11, 2013, 09:43:40 PM »

Public school was once a good thing, but about 25 years ago it began a nose dive and hasn't taken any corrective adjustment.
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