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Author Topic: Homeschool VS Public School  (Read 67739 times) Average Rating: 1
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Quinault
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« Reply #45 on: January 11, 2008, 02:46:16 PM »

One member of our parish has three children of her own and a neice she is raising. She is actually homeschooling AND going to school fulltime to earn a doctorate. In highschool kids tend to teach themselves moreso than needing to be taught. They do their schooling online, and she can monitor it all from her laptop at school. Her commute to school is about 1-1.5 hours. But putting a highschooler into a school is not unusual in homeschooling families. My husband was homeschooled up until highschool, and then he was placed into public school. And his brothers were homeschooled up until highschool and then were placed into a private school. In fact of all the homeschooling families I have known, all but one or two have put their children into a private or public highschool after homeschooling the first 8 years.
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« Reply #46 on: January 11, 2008, 02:53:40 PM »

I think that some women just can't deal with it. My mother being one of them. She homeschooled me for a year and then gave up. I then earned my GED, and I was done with school at 15. (I wasn't allowed into any schools in my district, so pubic school was NOT an option).

Irregardless of whether you formally homeschool or send your child to a public/private school, you are indeed homeschooling your child in many areas, or at least you should be Grin If we don't teach our children about our faith, then they will recieve a very warped view from someone else.
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« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2008, 03:42:30 PM »


Irregardless of whether you formally homeschool or send your child to a public/private school, you are indeed homeschooling your child in many areas, or at least you should be Grin If we don't teach our children about our faith, then they will recieve a very warped view from someone else.

I agree  Smiley Even though I have never homeschooled I do spend alot of time with my boys. We discuss many issues. Now that my older son is a teenager I have been asking him questions about how he would deal with different life situations (peer pressure issues). He seems to enjoy my questions because he always wants me to give him another difficult situation for him to problem solve. I don't know if these problem solving games will help him in real life but I hope it will give him a chance to at least think through how he would handle a difficult situation with school friends who might pressure him to sin.
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« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2008, 04:20:05 PM »

In highschool kids tend to teach themselves moreso than needing to be taught.
From a high school teacher (which is, BTW, two words), I can say with all confidence that this is absolutely untrue. The amount of time I spend giving direct instruction and reinforcement far outweighs the amount of time the students do self-directed projects. I, like many teachers, encourage the students to learn things on their own--but this in no way replaces a highly qualified teacher like those found at any American high school.

Irregardless of whether you formally homeschool or send your child to a public/private school, you are indeed homeschooling your child in many areas, or at least you should be Grin If we don't teach our children about our faith, then they will recieve a very warped view from someone else.
Absolutely parents ought to be instructing their children, but it is not to prevent the big bad atheist teachers from "warping" their minds. Look, if you don't trust a school to educate your child, don't send your child to that school. But let's get away from the inane idea that teachers have some sort of plan to rob you and your children of all moral and religious ideas. We're far too busy educating them to worry in the least about instructing them in matters of faith.
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« Reply #49 on: January 11, 2008, 04:28:21 PM »

From a high school teacher (which is, BTW, two words), I can say with all confidence that this is absolutely untrue. The amount of time I spend giving direct instruction and reinforcement far outweighs the amount of time the students do self-directed projects. I, like many teachers, encourage the students to learn things on their own--but this in no way replaces a highly qualified teacher like those found at any American high school.
Absolutely parents ought to be instructing their children, but it is not to prevent the big bad atheist teachers from "warping" their minds. Look, if you don't trust a school to educate your child, don't send your child to that school. But let's get away from the inane idea that teachers have some sort of plan to rob you and your children of all moral and religious ideas. We're far too busy educating them to worry in the least about instructing them in matters of faith.

I think as a teacher you are looking for insult where there is none. In HOMESCHOOLING kids in highschool tend to teach themselves more or have tutors. And I have no fears of "atheist" teachers. All parents need to teach their children at home about their faith, period. If your kids go to a private CHRISTIAN SCHOOL you STILL need to teach your kids at home about your faith.

Your daughter is young. And there are some things that you know more about as your kids get older.

You can feel however you choose to about how much you teach your kids hands on. I don't know you or your teaching methods, so I have no opinion. If you choose to be insulted...well, that isn't my problem.
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« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2008, 04:30:05 PM »

And by "someone else" in my post above, I actually was not refering to teachers. In my experience there is more damage from PEERS than teachers in public schools.
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« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2008, 04:40:11 PM »

And by "someone else" in my post above, I actually was not refering to teachers. In my experience there is more damage from PEERS than teachers in public schools.

Quinault,

I assumed you were talking about peers when you made your comment.
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« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2008, 05:59:05 PM »

And by "someone else" in my post above, I actually was not refering to teachers. In my experience there is more damage from PEERS than teachers in public schools.
Perhaps no offense was meant, but there is still betrayed in your words the idea that harm is being done to your children while they are in school. You say that other children cause more damage than teachers do. Does this not imply that teachers harm children? Yet this statement is absolutely untrue and is in fact defamatory toward all those in my profession. For six hours a day, these students are my kids. I would not harm them any more than I would harm my own daughter. On the contrary, one of my primary objectives is to impart to the students the skills necessary to lead a good life, one in which they can provide for themselves and for their family, in which they can make good choices and save themselves a lifetime of pain.

So choose the method of education that you feel is best for your children. I can't make that decision for you. Indeed, if done correctly, home-schooling can actually be a better education than a public school can provide--if the parents are willing to invest the time and energy into not only selecting materials and instructing the children but also being educated themselves. I would argue very strongly against teaching for anyone not willing to go to college themselves, be it in a public, private, or home-school. Those who teach must first be students. This is why the Missouri Board of Education requires that every teacher hold a bachelor's degree and pass a rigorous standardized test in the subject or grade they are to teach--and continue to learn through graduate studies and/or training workshops throughout their career. I would expect no less of a parent who wishes to home-school their children.

I hope I've been able to give you a better idea of what the public education system is like, from an insider's perspective. There is plenty of misinformation out there, and it's all too easy to find. But really look into the heart of a caring, committed teacher, and you'll see one of the kindest, most generous people on Earth.
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« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2008, 06:29:47 PM »

Dear Princess Mommy,

First, let me say I have the highest regard for women who have large families and also for women who homeschool. Then let me share with you that I have never homeschooled. My children have always attended public school. I didn't mean to cast mothers who homeschool in a poor light. My friends that did homeschool no longer have the energy to continue to teach as they are reaching menopause.

I guess I just want all the men out there to appreciate what women, like you, have given on behalf of your families.

With highest regard for your chosen path, Tamara  Smiley

Thank you for the clarification.  I appreciate it.
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« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2008, 06:38:13 PM »

Perhaps no offense was meant, but there is still betrayed in your words the idea that harm is being done to your children while they are in school. You say that other children cause more damage than teachers do. Does this not imply that teachers harm children? Yet this statement is absolutely untrue and is in fact defamatory toward all those in my profession. For six hours a day, these students are my kids. I would not harm them any more than I would harm my own daughter. On the contrary, one of my primary objectives is to impart to the students the skills necessary to lead a good life, one in which they can provide for themselves and for their family, in which they can make good choices and save themselves a lifetime of pain.

No, it does NOT imply in any way that teachers are harming their children. And I don't know on what planet saying that peers are harmful means that teachers are harmful. Do not read more into what I say than there is. Simply because YOU are sensitive, does NOT mean I am out to get you. Huh

So choose the method of education that you feel is best for your children. I can't make that decision for you. Indeed, if done correctly, home-schooling can actually be a better education than a public school can provide--if the parents are willing to invest the time and energy into not only selecting materials and instructing the children but also being educated themselves. I would argue very strongly against teaching for anyone not willing to go to college themselves, be it in a public, private, or home-school. Those who teach must first be students.

This is a gross overstatement and completely inaccurate. Simply because I have not been to college does not mean I am unable to teach my children. All it means is that 1) I don't have a mommy and daddy that will pay for college and 2) That I am in less debt that those that have been to college.

Read some Charlotte Mason or anything about classical education and you will see that teaching well has little to nothing to do with the level of education that the teacher has and more to do with how much they are willing and able to learn themselves in order to teach.

The school system here in the NW is broken beyond compare. The drop out rate is OVER 50%. The class sizes are huge. I was able to skip classes in school from about the 4th grade on WITHOUT THE TEACHERS KNOWING I WAS GONE. The only reason I had a GPA of .05 is because I never, and I mean NEVER handed in the homework. I would pass my tests at a rate of 90% or higher just from reading the material on my own.

Fro your assesment everyone that existed before standardized education is a complete and utter idiot. Shocked

You are young and are full of idealism. I am sure you are a good teacher. But a great majority of your peer teachers in THIS area are not that in love with what they do. They are more concerned with striking on "worthy wages day" and organizing all the demonstrations downtown. "What do we want?! Worthy wages! When do we want them?! NOW!!"

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« Reply #55 on: January 11, 2008, 06:42:00 PM »

And the skipping classes from my early years is not all at the same school. I attended 2 grade schools, one in an affluent neughborhood and one in the "ghetto." And I also attended two middle schools, one in the "ghetto" and one in the very rich affluent area of my city. So it wasn't merely limited to a single school or area. I lived in 4 different areas of the same city, the capital of my State actually. One would think that in the CAPITAL of a state that they would pay more attention to school shortcomings. But alas, no they paid no more attention there than anywhere else.
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« Reply #56 on: January 11, 2008, 06:54:32 PM »

Interestingly, the best teachers my brothers had in school were at the most "ghetto" of the "ghetto" schools in our area. But that wouldn't make me send my kids there. Fortunatly for my brothers they were 1)Twins so they had each other to keep the bad friends at bay. And 2) Complete social retards that had few to no friends. They avoided all the drugs and partying simply because no one would ever invite them. Grin
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« Reply #57 on: January 11, 2008, 06:56:02 PM »

No, it does NOT imply in any way that teachers are harming their children. And I don't know on what planet saying that peers are harmful means that teachers are harmful. Do not read more into what I say than there is. Simply because YOU are sensitive, does NOT mean I am out to get you. Huh
Of course you weren't out to get me, as I had not responded to this thread before you made that implication. And make it you did. Let me explain:

In my experience there is more damage from peers than teachers in public schools.
This is in the English language called an elliptical clause, meaning that words have been left out. Let me fill them in: "In my experience there is more damage from peers than there is damage from teachers in public schools." You have indeed implied that teachers damage students through the use of this elliptical clause.

Quote
The school system here in the NW is broken beyond compare. The drop out rate is OVER 50%. The class sizes are huge. I was able to skip classes in school from about the 4th grade on WITHOUT THE TEACHERS KNOWING I WAS GONE. The only reason I had a GPA of .05 is because I never, and I mean NEVER handed in the homework. I would pass my tests at a rate of 90% or higher just from reading the material on my own.
The only reason anyone ever fails one of my classes is that 1) they don't show up and 2) they don't do the homework. Passing tests is not necessarily a measure of success in a class, and thus most teachers base a very small percentage of the class grade on tests.

Quote
Fro your assesment everyone that existed before standardized education is a complete and utter idiot. Shocked
Yes, and so is everyone who existed afterward. The difference is that now we are standardly educated idiots. Grin My point was not that one must attend college to have worth; my point was that if one is not willing to learn, one should not presume to teach.
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« Reply #58 on: January 11, 2008, 07:02:56 PM »

I also said; "In my experience." And in my experience I have had more damage from peers than teachers. I have had teachers that have been horrible. I have had MANY bad experiences with public school teachers. But the damage done by my peers will always outweigh anything a teacher has done to me.

Quote
The only reason anyone ever fails one of my classes is that 1) they don't show up and 2) they don't do the homework. Passing tests is not necessarily a measure of success in a class, and thus most teachers base a very small percentage of the class grade on tests.


Ah, but if the one person that never hands in the homework and never shows up for class recieves the highest score, then maybe you need to reevaluate your teaching methods. I took the class and read just enough to screw up the bell curve.  Wink And that was the case in all my classes, not just a few.
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« Reply #59 on: January 11, 2008, 07:11:13 PM »

I also said; "In my experience." And in my experience I have had more damage from peers than teachers. I have had teachers that have been horrible. I have had MANY bad experiences with public school teachers. But the damage done by my peers will always outweigh anything a teacher has done to me.
That's a much better way to say it. Much clearer.

Quote
Ah, but if the one person that never hands in the homework and never shows up for class recieves the highest score, then maybe you need to reevaluate your teaching methods. I took the class and read just enough to screw up the bell curve.  Wink And that was the case in all my classes, not just a few.
They don't receive the highest score in my classes; in fact, they often receive the lowest! Also, a bell curve is never achieved in most individual schools, due to the insufficient number of students and (in many cases) similarity of their backgrounds. Small sampling, and from respondents too closely associated, renders a statistic invalid. One needs thousands of students from multiple cities and from many different districts (urban, suburban, and rural) to achieve a true bell curve.
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« Reply #60 on: January 11, 2008, 07:13:21 PM »

I actually TAUGHT my algebra class for almost a week. I had skipped nearly the entire quarter and the teacher had an emergency and had to leave. I was placed in charge of TEACHING the class, even though I never attended it, and I never handed in the homework. I had the highest score and was put in the position of "teacher" to the rest of my class. And guess what happened? All the kids that had been failing the class up to that point started performing really well! Hmmmmm......I guess that teaching degree didn't "take" for that teacher! Roll Eyes
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« Reply #61 on: January 11, 2008, 07:16:34 PM »

They don't receive the highest score in my classes; in fact, they often receive the lowest!

They may not in your classes, but I did in my classes.
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« Reply #62 on: January 11, 2008, 07:18:44 PM »

Maybe you should have been in my class. Wink
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« Reply #63 on: January 11, 2008, 07:20:06 PM »

Maybe you should have been in my class. Wink

Seeing as how I am 6 years older than you that would have been impossible. Cheesy
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« Reply #64 on: January 11, 2008, 07:48:43 PM »

I actually TAUGHT my algebra class for almost a week. I had skipped nearly the entire quarter and the teacher had an emergency and had to leave. I was placed in charge of TEACHING the class, even though I never attended it, and I never handed in the homework. I had the highest score and was put in the position of "teacher" to the rest of my class. And guess what happened? All the kids that had been failing the class up to that point started performing really well! Hmmmmm......I guess that teaching degree didn't "take" for that teacher! Roll Eyes

My brother-in-law had similar situation. He skipped classes constantly however, he would score very high on all of his classroom tests. But his teachers insisted on giving him low grades because he never did his homework even though he knew the material. He frequently could be found in the school library reading as many books as he could get his hands on. When they finally tested him, they discovered he tested very high, at the genius level. Unfortunately, most of our public schools are not set up to challenge children who are very bright. My children, though they are not geniuses, test above average on the various tests they have been given over the years and even they find school to be very boring. The public schools have to set their sights on educating the average student and in doing so ignore those who need more academic challenges.

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« Reply #65 on: January 11, 2008, 08:00:49 PM »

As I've said before, this

he would score very high on all of his classroom tests.
does not necessarily indicate this:

Quote
even though he knew the material.
because if the student truly "knew the material," he would have done the work.

Quote
But his teachers insisted on giving him low grades
Good for them! Why?

Quote
because he never did his homework
Right. It doesn't matter when that student gets a job as an adult whether he knew how to file his TPS reports; what matters is that he filed them. I'd much rather a student fail every test and turn all homework in complete and on time than to have one who skips school and passes a test.
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« Reply #66 on: January 11, 2008, 08:03:30 PM »

My brother-in-law had similar situation. He skipped classes constantly however, he would score very high on all of his classroom tests. But his teachers insisted on giving him low grades because he never did his homework even though he knew the material. He frequently could be found in the school library reading as many books as he could get his hands on. When they finally tested him, they discovered he tested very high, at the genius level. Unfortunately, most of our public schools are not set up to challenge children who are very bright. My children, though they are not geniuses, test above average on the various tests they have been given over the years and even they find school to be very boring. The public schools have to set their sights on educating the average student and in doing so ignore those who need more academic challenges.

Part of school is also learning how to play well with others.  Because I also was in the same situation in primary and secondary school, I learned my lesson that I can't just do what I wanted (like just going to the library to read interesting books) but had to work within the system.  I'm thankful my parents and teachers never mistook laziness and youthful rebellion for brilliance (there seems to be a lot of the former pretending to be the latter these days).
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« Reply #67 on: January 11, 2008, 08:26:08 PM »

As I've said before, this
does not necessarily indicate this:
because if the student truly "knew the material," he would have done the work.
Good for them! Why?
Right. It doesn't matter when that student gets a job as an adult whether he knew how to file his TPS reports; what matters is that he filed them. I'd much rather a student fail every test and turn all homework in complete and on time than to have one who skips school and passes a test.

He didn't do his homework because he already knew the material. The poor guy was bored to death with the curriculum. He was smart enough to teach the class himself. The problem was the school didn't recognize the fact he was very intelligent and needed more academic challenges. But most public schools are not set-up to take care of the needs of highly intelligent students. Public education is geared for the average student because the majority of the students are in that category.
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« Reply #68 on: January 11, 2008, 09:02:58 PM »

Part of school is also learning how to play well with others.  Because I also was in the same situation in primary and secondary school, I learned my lesson that I can't just do what I wanted (like just going to the library to read interesting books) but had to work within the system.  I'm thankful my parents and teachers never mistook laziness and youthful rebellion for brilliance (there seems to be a lot of the former pretending to be the latter these days).

He wasn't lazy. He graduated from Stanford with honors years later. Public education doesn't work for everyone.
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« Reply #69 on: January 11, 2008, 10:00:12 PM »

For all of you moms that are home schooling...my brother-in-law, who I mentioned above, helped develop a program at Stanford for students regardless if they are home schooled or not called EPGY (Education Program for Gifted Youth).

Click below if you want to learn more:

http://epgy.stanford.edu/
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« Reply #70 on: January 11, 2008, 10:30:34 PM »

He wasn't lazy. He graduated from Stanford with honors years later. Public education doesn't work for everyone.

Regardless of what he did later, he was lazy at the time.  An instructor has the right to make homework worth more points than tests.  Failure to complete the homework that is assigned is laziness. 
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« Reply #71 on: January 11, 2008, 10:53:04 PM »

Regardless of what he did later, he was lazy at the time.  An instructor has the right to make homework worth more points than tests.  Failure to complete the homework that is assigned is laziness. 

Sorry... I disagree. If a student knows the material in a class then doing the homework is in essence, just busy work. He wasn't laying around the house, eating Doritios, watching TV or playing video games. He was in the library reading a variety of books (math, chemistry, physics etc.) because his mind was yearning for more. He obviously felt very strongly about the lack of educational experiences for gifted youth in public school otherwise he never would have gotten involved with the EPGY program when he graduated from college.
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« Reply #72 on: January 11, 2008, 10:58:17 PM »

Sorry... I disagree. If a student knows the material in a class then doing the homework is in essence, just busy work. He wasn't laying around the house, eating Doritios, watching TV or playing video games. He was in the library reading a variety of books (math, chemistry, physics etc.) because his mind was yearning for more. He obviously felt very strongly about the lack of educational experiences for gifted youth in public school otherwise he never would have gotten involved with the EPGY program when he graduated from college.

I'll try telling my boss tomorrow at work that I'm just so brilliant that my job is beneath me; I wonder how that will go over.
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« Reply #73 on: January 11, 2008, 11:22:52 PM »

He wasn't lazy. He graduated from Stanford with honors years later. Public education doesn't work for everyone.
Apparently he learned to do his homework. See, public education did him some good.
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"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
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« Reply #74 on: January 11, 2008, 11:24:14 PM »

I'll try telling my boss tomorrow at work that I'm just so brilliant that my job is beneath me; I wonder how that will go over.
Thank you for validating everything I've said today.
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"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
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« Reply #75 on: January 12, 2008, 12:16:50 AM »

Thank you for validating everything I've said today.

I don't often do that for people with such avatars.   Tongue

When GiC was going off on his little eugenics tangent a few days back this is precisely what came to mind when his criterion for not sterilizing people was IQ - raw intelligence is such a small component of what makes a person either a good student, good worker or even an all around good person. 

I had that chip on my should when I was in high school - I'm too smart for this boring material.  And ultimately the most important things I learned in high school (other than some driver's ed stuff that pretty much saved my life) were to pick my battles, to work hard, to not eschew "unimportant" work and how to successfully function while working with people I don't agree with on just about anything. 
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« Reply #76 on: January 12, 2008, 12:22:53 AM »

Apparently he learned to do his homework. See, public education did him some good.

Unlikely, I know that in college I had next to no homework outside language classes; my math professors basically said, 'I assign homework because it is university policy, it is neither collected nor graded and I will not grade it even if you ask me to. They created the tests such that you could only pass them if you knew the material, if you went to class and did all assignments but still couldn't demonstrate proficiency on the exams you should, and did, fail. If you never went to class never did a bit of homework and only showed up for the few exams and aced them, then you would receive an A in the class. It really doesn't matter how you learn the subject, all that matters in the end is that you do learn it. Of course, I knew very few math students that could get away with skipping classes, I probably did it more than most but I still probably made 80% of my classes.

In the public school system, the problem with a few students is that the teachers teach towards the idiots in the class. I recall having weeks of lessons on a concept that I thought anyone should be able to get after an hour lecture; I never skipped class in high school, I was a pretty good student, but I would never pay attention either...I probably did so well because I used my lessons to do my homework for other classes, so I actually got it done but never at home.

Formal education does not always amount to education, intelligence, or teaching ability (especially teaching ability). But I do agree that those who truly have a passion for knowledge will go to school regardless of the cost or economic prospects (I did). It's not a fool-proof system but the current system at least gives a good baseline (though standardized tests should be more difficult by about a factor of 25; I don't know about Missouri, but I was going through practice tests for teachers with friend who is studying for them in California and I found that I was able to get a passing score on an entire range of subjects, I only hold degrees in Mathematics and Theology, with an undergraduate Minor in Computer Science; if I can pass the English, History, Biology, and Physics tests they are obviously to easy).
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« Reply #77 on: January 12, 2008, 01:58:49 AM »

From a high school teacher (which is, BTW, two words), I can say with all confidence that this is absolutely untrue. The amount of time I spend giving direct instruction and reinforcement far outweighs the amount of time the students do self-directed projects. I, like many teachers, encourage the students to learn things on their own--but this in no way replaces a highly qualified teacher like those found at any American high school.
Absolutely parents ought to be instructing their children, but it is not to prevent the big bad atheist teachers from "warping" their minds. Look, if you don't trust a school to educate your child, don't send your child to that school. But let's get away from the inane idea that teachers have some sort of plan to rob you and your children of all moral and religious ideas. We're far too busy educating them to worry in the least about instructing them in matters of faith.

I teach in the Chicago school system, and the problem is the fish don't know it's wet.

It has been shown time and time again that there are many teachers who have no problem pursuing an agenda.  And the textbooks! The one we have for history gushes all over Gorbachev and barely mentiones Reagan and John Paul II.
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« Reply #78 on: January 12, 2008, 02:13:54 AM »

Apparently he learned to do his homework. See, public education did him some good.

Well, no he didn't. In high school he continued this same behavior. He was on the academic decathlon team, the high school debate team, his writing abilities were excellent, he won all kinds of academic awards for his high school and his SAT score was almost perfect (he missed one question.) He had a few teachers who wanted to give him a "C" grade because he didn't complete his homework but his father worked out a deal with the school so he would get A's if he knew the material. He easily passed the tests his teachers prepared for him and went on to Stanford.
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« Reply #79 on: January 12, 2008, 04:23:40 AM »

I teach in the Chicago school system, and the problem is the fish don't know it's wet.

It has been shown time and time again that there are many teachers who have no problem pursuing an agenda.  And the textbooks! The one we have for history gushes all over Gorbachev and barely mentiones Reagan and John Paul II.

Well, none of that is exactly history, it's all current events; I don't see any reason why a history book should go much past WWII -- everything after that is just classified as 'general knowledge'.
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« Reply #80 on: January 12, 2008, 10:09:42 AM »

Well, none of that is exactly history, it's all current events; I don't see any reason why a history book should go much past WWII -- everything after that is just classified as 'general knowledge'.

Well, it's all history as the writers are all stuck in the mentality and perspective of the 70's (I love to see the old All in the Family, where the conservative viewpoints, including Reagan's presidency, are mocked, although time has now vindicated them).  Another issue is the harping on the population bomb (remember that book), overpopulation, blah, blah, blah....completing ignoring the problems of under- and de-population going on.
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
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                           and both come out of your mouth
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« Reply #81 on: January 12, 2008, 10:58:48 PM »

He had a few teachers who wanted to give him a "C" grade because he didn't complete his homework but his father worked out a deal with the school so he would get A's if he knew the material. He easily passed the tests his teachers prepared for him and went on to Stanford.
Oh God, not one of those parents. I think his teachers should be given a medal just for having to put up with them.
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« Reply #82 on: January 12, 2008, 11:26:46 PM »

Oh God, not one of those parents. I think his teachers should be given a medal just for having to put up with them.

My father-in-law was an educator by profession. I guess educators are the most troublesome parents...for other teachers...
Most of the public teachers out here in CA send their own children to the best private schools money can buy. California's public education system is one of THE worst in the nation.
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« Reply #83 on: January 12, 2008, 11:28:58 PM »

Perhaps, but still, bailing your child out of work he ought to be doing is not in any way going to prepare him for life in the real world. I would hope, even expect, for teachers to understand that.
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« Reply #84 on: January 12, 2008, 11:59:06 PM »

Perhaps, but still, bailing your child out of work he ought to be doing is not in any way going to prepare him for life in the real world. I would hope, even expect, for teachers to understand that.

I just found it so sadly ironic how a public school teacher could tell you how great the public school system is here and then without a hint of embarrassment or sense of hypocrisy send their own children to private school. It just shows how much faith and trust public educators have in the public school system they are a part of in California. Charter schools may be the only way California ever restores its education system but most of the teachers hate the charters because they aren't a part of the teacher's union.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2008, 11:59:39 PM by Tamara » Logged
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« Reply #85 on: January 13, 2008, 11:15:09 AM »

I split off the conversation about overpopulation to this thread: http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,14293.0.html.  --EofK
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Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams
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« Reply #86 on: July 07, 2009, 07:58:52 PM »

We have 7 children whom we home educate also.
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« Reply #87 on: July 08, 2009, 09:27:28 AM »

Well, most of you will know this already, but since the thread has been revived, we have two children, one almost two years old and the other due the end of September. We currently use Parents as Teachers, a program in Missouri for pre-school children similar to Early Head Start, but provided regardless of income level. We plan to have her attend the public pre-school in the town in which we live, and then transfer to the district where I teach (our pre-school is only a half-day). Both districts are top-notch, consistently exceeding state standards.
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"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
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« Reply #88 on: July 08, 2009, 10:52:36 AM »

Well, most of you will know this already, but since the thread has been revived, we have two children, one almost two years old and the other due the end of September. We currently use Parents as Teachers, a program in Missouri for pre-school children similar to Early Head Start, but provided regardless of income level. We plan to have her attend the public pre-school in the town in which we live, and then transfer to the district where I teach (our pre-school is only a half-day). Both districts are top-notch, consistently exceeding state standards.

I have to put in a good word for Parents as Teachers, too.  We had the sweetest lady as our PaT contact and it was so much fun when she came over to chat with us about Cait's development.  She provided some very valuable tips on dealing with what stages were coming next, how to encourage development, things to avoid, etc.  Kids change so much within the first year of life and it was great having an expert in child development to come by the house at our convenience to answer questions and encourage us.  I highly recommend the program.
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« Reply #89 on: July 11, 2009, 09:52:09 PM »

I was in an Abeka school when I was in third grade (Fundamental Baptist church) and have seen their materials since (little has changed).  I DESPISE their history and reading materials.  It's all white-washed, EVERYONE in AMERICAN history is an ideal "Christian" with no flaws (gag, gag)  Roll Eyes  Sorry, but how are we to learn from that?!

That said, I do use their elementary math and phonics Wink

People... I am begging you... just send your kids to regular schools, for your kids' future's sake... (don't reply, and I will not check this thread...)
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