Author Topic: Recommended Book on Reformation  (Read 364 times)

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Offline Luke

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Recommended Book on Reformation
« on: December 01, 2019, 09:57:15 PM »
Anyone have a book(s) to recommend about the history of the Reformation?

Offline PorphyriosK

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2019, 12:21:35 AM »
Rock and Sand by Fr. Josiah Trenham
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Offline platypus

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2019, 12:40:11 AM »
I liked The Oxford History of Christianity by John McManners. It skims the whole of Christian history, not just the reformation. I also think a lot of the writings of the reformers are interesting reads, although they're probably not the historical overview you're wanting.
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Offline Alpha60

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2019, 04:24:13 AM »
I liked The Oxford History of Christianity by John McManners. It skims the whole of Christian history, not just the reformation. I also think a lot of the writings of the reformers are interesting reads, although they're probably not the historical overview you're wanting.

I prefer the Cambridge History of Christianity, which deep dives into the entire history of the faith in a ten volume set.  When Oxford and Cambridge compete, we all win.

Council of Nicea:
Εθη ἀρχαῖα κρατείτω. 
Mores antiqui obtineant.
The ancient ways shall prevail.

The sentiment of Nicea in Greek and Latin, translated into English.

Offline David Young

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2019, 02:45:59 PM »
It seems to me that there are three sorts of book relating Christian history. Some are written by Christians, some by would-be historians who aim for objectivity and a bald narrative of events (leaving the reader to add his or her own perspective to them), and some dislike Christianity. It depends what you are looking for, but I would suggest a book written by a Christian, preferably one who is in favour of the Reformation, or at least sees positive value and features in it. You can decide whether or not you share the author's perspective. However, I can't recommend a particular one, as my church history tends to end with Wulfstan and start up again with Wesley!

There is a further division: some aim to be readable and engaging, arousing the reader's lively interest; some aim to be academic, and of these some seem to be written more to impress other academics than to actually tell anyone what happened. That is true of any history, not just Christian.

I hope you find a good one.
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Offline Malihah

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2019, 07:32:21 PM »
The Reformation with the fracturing of the Church into thousands of disorganized splinters has been a curse to the Christian world. 

Every man is the center of his own little world and he just makes up his own truth as he goes along with no faith in anything except his own puny intellect.

Offline JTLoganville

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2019, 07:39:59 PM »
Read the primary texts themselves:

http://www.bookofconcord.org/

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2019, 08:38:56 PM »
Protestant Reformation happened in the 16th century.
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Offline Iconodule

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2019, 12:47:09 PM »
Carlos Eire's Reformations is great and very fun to read. Comprehensive, well-written, with lots of pretty pictures and quotations to add flavor. It covers both the various strains of Protestantism as well as the reform movements within the Catholic Church.
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Offline Alpha60

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2019, 08:28:41 AM »
Carlos Eire's Reformations is great and very fun to read. Comprehensive, well-written, with lots of pretty pictures and quotations to add flavor. It covers both the various strains of Protestantism as well as the reform movements within the Catholic Church.

That looks good.

I myself like to study Protestantism through its worship; I like to study all religion through its worship, and the liturgical texts of Bradshaw and Johnson, and the Oxford History of Christian Worship, have been invaluable.  Beyond that, I prefer to study the history of individual churches individually.  Right now I am seeking to learn more about the Church of Scotland, especially its worship practices and how they have evolved over time, the Moravians starting with St. Jan Hus, continuing with the mad Count Zinzendorf, the contact with John Wesley, and winding up today as a dying mainline denomination with a rich history, which could, God willing, wind up being absorbed in some manner, indirectly through attrition or more directly with a competing Western Rite, into the Czech and Slovak Orthodox Church.

But most of all, I am really looking for an objective history of the Waldensians.  They were the first recognizable Protestant denomination without an obvious link to Gnosticism (some people try to tie them to the Albigensians or the Bogomils, but the evidence doesnt seem to support this, and the people doing it were primarily “Trail of Blood” / “Landmark Baptist” / SDA Great apostasy types).  The actual beliefs of the denomination look more interesting.

Council of Nicea:
Εθη ἀρχαῖα κρατείτω. 
Mores antiqui obtineant.
The ancient ways shall prevail.

The sentiment of Nicea in Greek and Latin, translated into English.

Offline Arachne

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2019, 10:08:20 AM »
When Oxford and Cambridge compete, we all win.

Quoted for truth.
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Offline Alpha60

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2019, 10:41:26 AM »
When Oxford and Cambridge compete, we all win.

Quoted for truth.

Thank you Arachne.  :)

You know, my father was a Rhodes Scholar and sailed to England in the 1950s, via Southern Europe on the Italian Line, and studied at Oxford, and returned on the RMS Queen Elisabeth, the less fortunate  sister ship to the RMS Queen Mary (the QE2 was named after the RMS Queen Elisabeth and her replacement after the RMS Queen Mary, which still survives in Long Beach and is literally the last of the classic pre-war oceanliners).

Council of Nicea:
Εθη ἀρχαῖα κρατείτω. 
Mores antiqui obtineant.
The ancient ways shall prevail.

The sentiment of Nicea in Greek and Latin, translated into English.

Offline David Young

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Re: Recommended Book on Reformation
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2019, 05:49:26 PM »
... continuing with the mad Count Zinzendorf,

Mad? Why do you write that? IMHO God's hand was upon him and his community, and God's Spirit worked remarkably through him. In fact when I once heard a Pentecostal give a 'paper' and say that 'the latter rain' began with Alexander Boddy and with the events in Azusa Street, I challenged him in the question time and suggested that, if it can be pinpointed at all, then the events at Herrnhut are where I would locate it. I sometimes read the German Moravian hymnbook in my morning devotions, and find them richly nourishing. So: why "mad"?
"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15