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Author Topic: C. S. Lewis Anniversary  (Read 2514 times) Average Rating: 0
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Ebor
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« on: November 22, 2004, 09:43:47 PM »

Forty-one years ago today, Clive Staples Lewis died.  I post this here since many people have read some of his works, whether "Narnia" or "Mere Christianity" or "A Grief Observed" or any of the others.

May he rest in Peace.

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

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« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2004, 11:26:25 PM »

Memory Eternal for Mr. Lewis!
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Ebor
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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2004, 10:52:32 PM »

And another:  Professor Lewis was born 106 years ago today in Belfast, Northern Ireland.  A couple of quotes:

"Miracles are a retelling in small letters of the very same story which is written across the whole world in letters too large for some of us to see."

 "You can't get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me."

and a bit of information from the "Writer's Almanac" for this:

Quote
"He began teaching philosophy at Oxford, where he met J.R.R. Tolkien. The night of their first meeting, Lewis wrote in his diary, "No harm in him: only needs a smack or two."

(Recall that Lewis was an atheist when he first met Tolkien )

Quote
But he is best remembered for the seven books in the Chronicles of Narnia, which he started publishing in 1950. Lewis decided to write for children, even though he never had any children himself and had never had any strong relationships with children. He wanted to give children what he had gotten himself from fairytales when he was a child. Lewis said, "When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."

By an odd coincidence this is also the birthday of  Louisa May Alcott and Madeline L'Engle.

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2004, 11:52:44 PM »

Ebor,

We need to petition the High Administrators for a Literary Section and demand that you be appointed the Provost Moderator.

james

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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2004, 11:54:29 PM »

Quote
By an odd coincidence this is also the birthday of  Louisa May Alcott and Madeline L'Engle.

the latter birthday coincidence (between Lewis and L'Engle) is truly amazing for me...they are 2 of the 3 Christian writers of children's fantasy (Tolkien of course being the 3rd) that i "discovered" 2 summers ago (not their writing - knew about all their books since i was a kid - but the fact that they are/were all Christian as well was the "discovery" i speak of), which began my joint obsession with God and fantasy literature, since all three writers found a distinct connection between the two, as do i Smiley

Ebor, have you read the book "Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art" by L'Engle? i found it in the Christian section of barnes and noble...it is really very good and filled with a lot of truth: it is simply L'Engle writing quite humbly about how her faith informs her art (writing), etc. i highly recommend it Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2004, 11:57:02 PM »

Quote
We need to petition the High Administrators for a Literary Section and demand that you be appointed the Provost Moderator.


I second this motion. Grin
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Ebor
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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2004, 02:14:55 PM »

Ebor,

We need to petition the High Administrators for a Literary Section and demand that you be appointed the Provost Moderator.

james



Thank you.  You've made a simple book-worm with a mind like Barliman Butterbur ("...memory is like a lumber-room: thing wanted always buried", but lots of odd bits and occasional good things in the boxes) very happy with your  kind words. Smiley

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

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« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2004, 02:24:38 PM »

the latter birthday coincidence (between Lewis and L'Engle) is truly amazing for me...they are 2 of the 3 Christian writers of children's fantasy (Tolkien of course being the 3rd) that i "discovered" 2 summers ago (not their writing - knew about all their books since i was a kid - but the fact that they are/were all Christian as well was the "discovery" i speak of), which began my joint obsession with God and fantasy literature, since all three writers found a distinct connection between the two, as do i Smiley

Ebor, have you read the book "Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art" by L'Engle? i found it in the Christian section of barnes and noble...it is really very good and filled with a lot of truth: it is simply L'Engle writing quite humbly about how her faith informs her art (writing), etc. i highly recommend it Smiley

I believe that I have a copy if the book, but I don't think I've delved into it too deeply yet.  I'll get it out.  Thank you for the recommedation.  

In return, have you ever read Dorothy L. Sayers? She knew Lewis and Tolkien and wrote detective fiction as well as Christian writings *and* translated Dante.  I am thinking in particular of "The Mind of the Maker"?  (used copies can be gotten quite cheaply).  L'Engle wrote an introduction for an edition of it.

As I wrote that, it occurred to me of how Tolkien wrote of being a sub-creator as does Sayers and both come from Christianity.

Ebor

P.S. Thanks for the second.  Smiley
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2004, 07:28:32 PM »

Quote
In return, have you ever read Dorothy L. Sayers? She knew Lewis and Tolkien and wrote detective fiction as well as Christian writings *and* translated Dante.  I am thinking in particular of "The Mind of the Maker"?  (used copies can be gotten quite cheaply).  L'Engle wrote an introduction for an edition of it.

As I wrote that, it occurred to me of how Tolkien wrote of being a sub-creator as does Sayers and both come from Christianity.

I have not read any Sayers, but her name has popped up repeatedly in my various readings both for school and for pleasure, so I will look into her...chances are I won't be able to seriously give her a read until I finish school next August though, but she's on my mind til then. Smiley

And the distinction between creator/subcreator is a biggie for me, and L'Engle I think touches on it as well (I don't recall if she uses "subcreator" tho) in "Walking on Water." Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2005, 11:24:34 AM »

A revival: 42 years ago today, Clive Staples Lewis died.ÂÂ  

His death didn't get much coverage due John Kennedy being assassinated and Aldous Huxley also dying that day.  But his writings still go on.

I wonder how many people on this forum have read any of his works.ÂÂ  I'd wager a good number.

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

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« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2005, 02:40:53 PM »

how apt, since i am rereading the Narnia series right now in anticipation of the movie the Lion, Witch and Wardrobe coming out on dec. 9...im currently on the Magician's Nephew.

thanx for the bump of the thread, Ebor (my how time flies...)

D
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« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2005, 03:26:53 PM »

C.S. Lewis is rotting in hell, even as we speak, because he drank liquor and smoked pipes......well, at least according to my fundamentalist, Wesleyan grandmother
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« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2005, 03:54:20 PM »

Eternal memory!

Fr. Deacon Lance, who spent many a night up late reading the Chronicles.
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« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2005, 04:15:30 PM »

I wonder how many people on this forum have read any of his works.ÂÂ  I'd wager a good number.

I've read The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, and Mere Christianity.
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2005, 04:55:06 PM »

I've read "The Screwtape Letters", "Screwtape Proposes a Toast", "The Great Divorce",  "Till We Have Faces", The entire space trilogy (my personal favorite), "Mere Christianity", "Miracles", "The Problem of Pain", and the entire Narnia Chronicles.....
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« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2005, 05:01:14 PM »

Memory Eternal!

I, too, have read a number of Lewis' works, and since my conversion I've been gratified to see that he's cited nearly as often by modern Orthodox* as by Anglicans.  Let's see, off the top of my head I recall reading the Narnia books (though only as an adult), Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, Till We Have Faces, and Surprised by Joy, as well as the Lewis biography Jack (I can't remember the author's name).  I just hope next month's release of the LW&W movie will spur others to read this great Christian's works.

BTW, has any else listened to John Cleese's recording of Screwtape?  Brilliant.

BJohnD

*Is this an oxymoron?  Grin
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2005, 05:20:00 PM »

....as well as the Lewis biography Jack (I can't remember the author's name).

George Sayer
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« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2005, 05:01:11 PM »

We have the John Cleese "Screwtape" tapes.  He *is* very good, isn't he?

I'm interested that so many have read "The Great Divorce" and "Till We Have Faces".  They used to be a bit more unknown.

Then there is "A Grief Observed".  Perhaps it's not something people think of or want to read until it might be needed.

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

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« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2005, 05:15:01 PM »

I own A Grief Observed, but have never read it, no doubt for the very reason you suggest.  Interestingly enough, I know atheists who have read it and liked it.

I read most of the Lewis books I mentioned in a relatively brief period of time after my return to church about 10 years ago.  Borders had most of them in very cheap paperback editions, so I just grabbed the ones that sounded interesting.  I think TGD is brilliant, even though I had no idea who this "George MacDonald" fellow was when I read it.
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« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2005, 07:44:57 PM »

That is intriguing about the atheists and "A Grief Observed".  It is a powerful little book.  But it might not resonate with those who have not had great loss.  Otoh, it could be a good thing to read before attempting to comfort someone who *is* experiencing great grief.  In the depths of sorrow, someone who has not experienced it telling a mourner something glib or easy is not going to be a help.

From Chapter 2:

"Talk to me about the truth of religion and I’ll listen gladly. Talk to me about the duty of religion and I’ll listen submissively. But don’t come talking to me about the consolations of religion or I shall suspect that you don’t understand."

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

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« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2005, 10:41:01 PM »



From Chapter 2:

"Talk to me about the truth of religion and I’ll listen gladly. Talk to me about the duty of religion and I’ll listen submissively. But don’t come talking to me about the consolations of religion or I shall suspect that you don’t understand."

Ebor


Ebor,
These words have meant so much to me over the last year. They brought me such a feeling of comfort when I felt surrounded by an utter lack of true understanding coming from otherwise well meaning and good people. The words still resonate deeply with me. Thank you for bringing up C.S. Lewis- one of my favorites(favourites for his sake Smiley ) It's hard to imagine he wasn't divinely inspired.
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« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2005, 01:37:48 PM »

I'm glad that I chose a good quote, Bogo. There's a hymn from the Episcopal Hymnal to the tune called "Georgetown" that, I think, has some of this idea in a sort of way. I'll try to find the melody on-line so you can hear it if you like.



They cast their nets in Galilee
just off the hills of brown;
Such happy, simple fisherfolk
before the Lord came down.

Contented, peaceful fishermen
before they ever knew
The peace of God that filled their hearts
brimful, and broke them too.

Young John who trimmed the flapping sail,
homeless in Patmos died.
Peter, who hauled the teeming net,
head-down was crucified.

The peace of God, it is no peace,
but strife closed in the sod;
Yet, brothers, pray for but one thing
-- the marvelous peace of God.


Well, *I* think it possible that Lewis had some Divine Inspiration.   Wink

Ebor
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"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
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