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Author Topic: What are your lessons/study time like?  (Read 2128 times) Average Rating: 0
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irene
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« on: November 02, 2005, 05:13:30 PM »

Hi there,

I am curious as to what catechumens have experienced during  study  time with their priest.  And do you follow a study guide?  The reason I ask is because mine is very low key, and basically follows the forum of , 'if I have any questions just ask.' 

Thanks for your input,
Irene   
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norespite
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« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2005, 05:16:14 PM »

At my church there was a group that met and went over beliefs and whatnot but I wasn't able to go. So I read stuff that my priest recommended and talked to him and attended all the services I could. Attending services is half (or more) of being a catechumen.
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2005, 11:21:10 PM »

My catechumenate was (perhaps?) similar to yours, Irene. The catechist (who was assigned by the priest) was knowledgable, but saw that I was the type who would be reading and studying anyway, so he basically just suggested books for me to read, and we met a few times so I could ask him questions. Personally, I would like to see something more formal and consistent in our Churches, but I suppose such systemization has it's drawbacks as well.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2005, 11:23:04 PM by Asteriktos » Logged

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Vasili Kosta
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« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2005, 06:28:07 AM »

My wife and I receive a huge list of questions the Father has us answer at home. WHen we finish, we give it back to him and we receive more questions. As long as we show up and keep coming, he gives us more questions. Some of the questions are pretty in depth but he tells me to answer them as simply as possible and from the heart. He knocks me and tells me to let go of my brain and stop trying to get deep on things which are simple.

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Arystarcus
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2005, 01:53:41 PM »

I just met with the parish priest every week and basically read through chapters of "These Truths We Hold" and then he took the time to answer any questions I had on what was just read, or anything else that came to mind.

That was pretty much it.

You can find this book available online here:

St. Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary - These Truths We Hold

and

St. Seraphim Orthodox Cathedral - These Truths We Hold
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MaryCecilia
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2005, 02:55:01 PM »

The first few months of my Catechumenate I spent in weekly lessons at my college's cafe with my priest and he would assign me to read the one book by Clark Carlton, (can't remember the name right now...) the one for those coming from the Catholic church, it had a bunch of questions in it that he would go over with me...in the middle of my catechumenate I moved with my Mom and ended up learning stuff on my own from that point because the church I was first a catechumen in was too far to travel to since I don't drive, so I was stuck just reading The Law of God from that point.  I would ask the priest questions about what I was reading, or ask my soon to be GodMother if I didn't understand something.  That was basically it.  I can definetly say the Catechumenate instruction does vary from church to church most likely.  It depends on the priest I think.

Mary
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zebu
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« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2005, 05:32:43 PM »

I began my catechumenate just a few weeks ago, and my instruction seems to be a lot more formal than everyone else's.  Once every other week, I have to go to the Inquierer's Classes, which are somewhat more structured than what I have read here.  While there is no permanent yearly lesson plan or anything, the priest does make lesson plans whenever we start a new unit, and he gives us things to read.  It is actually quite "academic", like some people even take lecture notes! The priest really goes quite in-depth, it took us three months to learn about liturgical arts, which on the syllabus was only three sections.  ÃƒÆ’‚ Now we are doing a unit on the virtues and vices, which on the syllabus has eight sections...ya, so we should finish that sometime next summer, lol.  I guess the formality and thoroughness of it all  is because the priest is also a college professor.  Then in addition to this, preferably every Saturday and at a minimum of two Saturdays per month, there is "private" catechesis.  Though it really isn't always private, last time the other catechumen was there too(though that isn't to say I have a problem with that or anything).  Anyways, the private catechesis is a bit less structered, like there is more discussion and questions, and we are allowed to go off on tangents, as opposed to the inquirer's class where we stick to the official topic.  These are also very in depth, the first private catechesis was almost 2 hours and covered only "how to enter an Orthodox church".  But I like the thoroughness of it all, so please don't think I am complaining!
« Last Edit: November 06, 2005, 05:35:45 PM by zebu » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2005, 06:56:12 PM »

non-existent
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