Author Topic: "Let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything"  (Read 168 times)

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Offline Iconodule

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"Let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything"
« on: October 05, 2018, 09:51:16 AM »

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"I implore you, let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything." A little less than a thousand years ago, these wise words were written with blazing fire as the estrangement between Rome and Constantinople started to accelerate, leading to the Great Schism in 1054. From that time until today, not a single letter has fallen away from these wise Antiochian words. With these expressions, Patriarch Peter III of Antioch addressed Patriarch Michael Cerularius of Constantinople in 1054, asking him in a fraternal letter to distinguish "between what must be avoided, what must be reformed, and that about which silence must be kept" in the dispute with Rome, imploring him to look "with attention to good intention, so if the faith is not in danger, then we must prioritize peace and love over other things because the Westerners are our brothers, even if they very often err." The Patriarch of Antioch closed his letter by saying, "Therefore, I cast myself at your feet and implore you to be more lenient than you have been, lest you too also be one who, desiring to raise one who has fallen, only makes his fall heavier."

 This position of Antioch lies at the heart of Antioch's gift and role as a "bridge" between the churches, prophetic Antioch who warns of dangers and calls for unity. How applicable is the position of the wise Patriarch Peter III of Antioch, who did not deviate from the necessity of reforming what is corrupt in faith and dogma and the necessity of leniency in what does not touch on either, to the situation of the Orthodox Church today and to the necessity of distinguishing between what is important and what is more important!

 With the acceleration of the process of estrangement between Moscow and Constantinople over Ukraine, which may bring the Orthodox world to a spasm of schism resembling the schism of 1054, the events of 1054 come once more to the fore and the same equation is posed to the conscience of the universal Orthodox Church with the growing dispute between the two poles of Orthodoxy over the issue of granting autocephaly to the Orthodox Church in Ukraine.

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Carol Saba: Antioch, Ukraine, and the Danger of Schism in Orthodoxy
Mencius said, “Instruction makes use of many techniques. When I do not deign to instruct someone, that too is a form of instruction.”

Offline Justin Kolodziej

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Re: "Let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything"
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 11:08:27 AM »
Is the Antioch-Jerusalem dispute still a thing?
Too many theologists, not enough theologians.

Offline Iconodule

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Re: "Let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything"
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2018, 11:21:44 AM »
Yep.
Mencius said, “Instruction makes use of many techniques. When I do not deign to instruct someone, that too is a form of instruction.”

Offline Rohzek

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Re: "Let us not demand everything, lest we lose everything"
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2018, 12:04:12 PM »
Yep.

Seriously? Wow. So before solving a situation which is infinitely less complicated, the EP is going to "solve" the Ukranian problem? Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople is out of his mind.
"Il ne faut imaginer Dieu ni trop bon, ni méchant. La justice est entre l'excès de la clémence et la cruauté, ainsi que les peines finies sont entre l'impunité et les peines éternelles." - Denise Diderot, Pensées philosophiques 1746