OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 01, 2014, 11:28:20 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Anne Rice went back to the RC Church  (Read 3122 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Vasili Kosta
New Guy
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 27

St. Vasilios the Great, Archbishop of Caesarea


« on: October 29, 2005, 03:15:20 PM »

Anne Rice went back to the RC Church

Any thoughts?

VK
Logged
JoeS
(aka StMarkEofE)
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,122


Global Warming Enthusiast.


« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2005, 05:48:05 PM »


Wonderful! Any time someone comes back to God we should rejoice.

JoeS
Logged
Landon77
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA (Antiochian Western Orthodox in exile)
Posts: 308


« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2005, 06:12:01 PM »

  I'm happy for her.
Logged

"How stands your mighty god? My God is stronger than he."  -St. Boniface
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2005, 07:01:37 PM »

Yes, me too.

Quote
She can cite scholarly authority for giving her Christ a birth date of 11 B.C., and for making James, his disciple, the son of Joseph by a previous marriage. But she's also taken liberties where they don't explicitly conflict with Scripture. No one reports that the young Jesus studied with the historian Philo of Alexandria, as the novel has it—or that Jesus' family was in Alexandria at all. And she's used legends of the boy Messiah's miracles from the noncanonical Apocrypha: bringing clay birds to life, striking a bully dead and resurrecting him.

Anyone know what they mean here by "noncanonical Apocrypha"?  I'm guessing they really don't mean the "Apocrypha" but the Gnostic Gospels (Thomas, Mary Magdalene, etc.).  I bought a "Complete Idiot's Guide to the Gnostic Gospels" recently, so maybe I should actually open the book.
Logged
Vasili Kosta
New Guy
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 27

St. Vasilios the Great, Archbishop of Caesarea


« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2005, 07:38:08 PM »

I think a better word would be "pseudepigrapha" which would be "false" writings as opposed to Apocryphal as in the OT Books of Maccabees Tobit Judith, etc. which we consider Deuterocanonical. The public light sees these through Protestant eyes, which means anything not in their Bibles are Apocryphal, which they translate into "false" or "error" texts.

VK
Logged
monkvasyl
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: UOC 0f USA
Posts: 653



« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2005, 12:38:11 PM »


There's great rejoicing when the lost sheep returns.  Concerning some of the trash she has written, this is nothing short of a Pauline conversion.
Logged

The unworthy hierodeacon, Vasyl
Bogoliubtsy
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,268



« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2005, 01:33:32 PM »

Funny story-

A very good friend of mine who used to be involved with the "goth" scene in her younger years(and was therefore an admirer of Ann Rice) converted to Orthodoxy and is now studying theology at an Orthodox seminary. After hearing that Ann Rice had, to the consternation of some of her readers, come back to the Catholic Church, my friend wrote Ms. Rice an email mentioning how she thought it a logical movement from the "goth" world to a search for spiritual life. She sent out the email a few weeks ago but got a reply from Ann Rice yesterday- in the reply Ms. Rice talked about how the modernization of the Catholic Church and the destruction of the "old ways" was one thing which really turned her off. She also promised my friend that she would visit a local Orthodox Church when she returns from the book tour she's presently on. 

HA!
« Last Edit: November 29, 2005, 01:34:08 PM by Bogoliubtsy » Logged

"When you give food to the poor, they call you a saint. When you ask why the poor have no food, they call you a communist". - Archbishop Hélder Pessoa Câmara
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2005, 02:32:43 PM »

nice story! that's awesome.

Donna, who has put Christ the Lord, Out of Egypt onto her reading list of the next few months...
Logged

hmmmm...
KATHXOYMENOC
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 147



« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2005, 06:12:49 PM »

An Orthodox Christian's perspective on Anne Rice's book that I read/found on an Orthodox blog:

From: http://www.conciliarpress.com/blog/

Anne Rice's Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt

When Shelly took off to go to a retreat in Danville over the weekend, I swung by Borders and picked up Anne Rice's newest novel, Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt. Her book fascinates me for any number of reasons, not least of which is her return to her childhood faith. My heart rejoiced that the Prodigal Daughter found her way back to the house of the Father! I had never read any of her creepy vampire books. I am no fan of horror books or movies. Even watching old black-and-white Abbot and Costello meet Wolfman movies terrifies me.

When I finished the book late Saturday afternoon, I was amazed. The novel is quite a tour de force. Here are some initial impressions. Your mileage of course may vary.

Historical accuracy

Anne Rice has carefully done her homework. I read her Author's Note first (starting page 305), mostly because I wanted to know how she wrote this novel. I'm embarrassed to admit it, but there's a bunch of background information I should have known but didn't. For example, I didn't know anything -- or maybe I've forgotten, I'm nearly 50 -- about Herod Archelaus except that he was Herod's son. But being a wise technical writer, I did a Google search and found a great website that satisfied nearly every niggling historical question I could think of. Check out the Livius website and some of the embedded links for more information about various historical characters mentioned in the novel. I just mentally added Josephus to my already impossibly long reading queue.

Speaking of the Author's Note, given the amount of stuff she's read, I'm amazed that Anne Rice has managed to avoid stepping on dangerous theological landmines in her faith or in her novel. In that vast morass of current "Jesus" scholarship, she's figured out the lay of the land, that is, which nut cases to avoid. She favorably mentions the scholars I like (Luke Timothy Johnson, Martin Hengel, Charlotte Allen, N.T. Wright), so what's not to like?

Blessed Virgin Mary

Eastern Orthodox readers should love the book; conservative evangelical Protestants cursed with historical amnesia almost certainly won't. The Blessed Virgin Mary (BVM) is indeed perpetually virgin, in Anne Rice's telling. So while the Christian Booksellers Association (CBA) crowd will run backwards and snort in horror, the historical irony is that John Calvin and Martin Luther -- both decent evangelicals themselves -- wouldn't be offended in the least in Rice's portrayal of the BVM as perpetually virgin. In fact, they would be horrified at how American evangelicalism has cut itself off from Christian conciliar origins.

Mystery and miracle

I liked how slowly the story of Jesus unfolded as a seven year old boy. In one sense, the entire novel is an extended meditation on St Luke's wondrous words: "And Jesus increased in wisdom and in stature, and in favor with God and man." (Luke 2:52)

Anne Rice demonstrates a certain apophatic restraint in how the young Jesus comes to understand Who He Is. Eastern Orthodox readers who can appreciate mystery ("I will not speak of Your mystery to Your enemies") will certainly appreciate how certain characters (for example, Elizabeth, the mother of John the Forerunner) only discloses certain revelations when it's appropriate to do so. Characters just don't blabber out profound mysteries. Holy mysteries are treated with respect.

Some quirks emerge in Rice's novel. Maybe it just shows how wacko I have become that I loved them. I didn't mind Elizabeth sending John to live out with the Essences after she dies. I didn't mind Joseph, the BVM, and Jesus living in Alexandria and meeting Philo the famous Jewish philosopher! Later, Cleopas, one of the uncles of Jesus, even presents two manuscripts of Philo to a rabbi in Nazareth as a gift. I was charmed. Finally, I didn't mind Jesus performing certain miracles when he was a kid. They really do make sense in the context of the novel. If I can swallow the Protoevangelium of St James, a couple of pseudepigraphical miracles (from the Infancy Gospel of Thomas) shouldn't give me theological indigestion. It wasn't that long ago stories like that gave me The Willies. Maybe this is proof positive that I'm not a Fundamentalist Bible Banger anymore after all!?!?!?

I must admit that it took me nearly 121 pages before I could fully suspend my disbelief. But then Anne Rice snagged me hook-line-and-sinker.

A Jewish Jesus

What I liked best about the novel is just how Jewish Jesus is. The Jewishness of Jesus in Anne Rice's writing is carefully depicted, right down to some of the gentle humor. (But don't expect any Woody Allen or Mel Brooks jokes!) The character of Jesus is molded in the context of living first-century Judaism. This is where Anne Rice's historical research paid off in spades. For example, Jesus is certainly trilingual, and maybe even quadri-lingual. He knows Greek, Aramaic, Hebrew, and perhaps even a smattering of Latin.

Chapter 17 especially enchanted me. Rice describes the young Jesus meeting three rabbis in the Nazareth synagogue for the first time. The oldest rabbi throws out a series of trick questions to the young Jesus, to test His knowledge of the Law and the Prophets. The Q+A scene is wonderful. Immediately I thought of young Reuven Malter before Reb Saunders in Chaim Potok's magnificent novel, The Chosen. Anne Rice really did a great job of emphasizing the sheer Jewishness of Jesus. The young Jesus she depicts could have been Danny Saunders or David Lurie, other characters out of the novels of Chaim Potok (of blessed memory).

Chalcedonian Christology and Human Free Will

Maybe it's fortuitous that I'm also reading through Fr John McGuckin's book on St Cyril of Alexandria right now. There are many critics of Chalcedonian Christology who think how we describe Jesus of Nazareth as one person in two natures has actually retarded Christological reflection. These critics regard St Cyril and his heritage as a Christological "dead end!" Part of the problem is we Westerners have inherited a view of the private self that I'm not persuaded stands up to scrutiny (For hints at an alternative, see Philip Cary's fascinating Augustine's Invention of the Inner Self). Fiction writers think they have to describe a tortured Jesus to make the story credible to modern readers.

In an Orthodox Writers email list that I belong to, someone bravely admitted she had trouble making sense of humanity of Jesus, because she couldn't fathom how God could be truly human without being sinful. As I remember, she concluded the problem is with us--we aren't truly human. Sin isn't natural to the human condition. But if there's any writer in the world of fiction capable of portraying the realization dawning on the young boy Jesus just exactly Who He Is, I think Anne Rice has nailed it.

Theologically, this strikes me as a very tricky proposition, not easy to depict without sounding maudlin or falsely sentimental or for that matter heretical (for example, Ernest Renan or D.H. Lawrence or Nikos Kazantzakis). Fiction writers have a hard time depicting a human Jesus unless he's homosexual or married or otherwise conflicted. Albert Schweitzer's classic work, The Quest for the Historical Jesus, describes one 19th century theologian after another who fell into the trap of creating a "Jesus" in their own flawed image.

One way we might measure Anne Rice's achievement is to assess whether she has successfully depicted a human Jesus with a genuinely natural will, but not a gnomic will. Maybe it's easier to understand what St Maximus means by paraphrasing gnomic will as an opinionated will. Modern men and women are forced to have opinions on nearly every object under the sun, yet St Maximus insists that Jesus didn't have any opinions. Jesus didn't have to deliberate when facing milestones in His life. He simply chose the will of His Father.

Our problem is, we post/moderns can't imagine a truly human Jesus without a gnomic will. Yet it's part of the dogmatic history of the Eastern Orthodox Church which we owe to St Maximus the Confessor when we insist that Jesus Christ possesses two natural wills, one divine and one human, but not a gnomic will.

This dogmatic truth is difficult enough to understand theologically. It may well be impossible to depict in a novel. But I think Anne Rice may have pulled it off. It's a theological paradox (but no less accurate) that the truly free person is not someone who is tormented by dilemmas of choice. Sophie of Sophie's Choice most certainly is not a free person. The truly free person doesn't spend her time wringing her hands in anguish over the multitude of possible choices! Yet we cannot imagine any other version of free will other than a supermarket of choices.

But the Eastern Orthodox dogmatic tradition thinks otherwise. We fall back on having to make difficult choices because we simply don't know what is our highest good. Ignorance begets Vacillation, and Vacillation is the father of Deliberation. Ironically, our inability to choose, the very process of deliberation -- Should I choose A or B? Or maybe C? -- shows us just how unfree we really are. Having a multitude of choices is its own set of problems. We're not as free as we think we are if we have difficulty choosing what is right and good. Quite frankly, it's bizarre to think of sheer choice in and of itself as being Our Highest Good.

In Anne Rice's novel, the young Jesus comes to realize He shouldn't make it snow or stop raining willy-nilly. He understands at an early age that He must only do what the Father wills. Admittedly, this is a very difficult truth to hear and do. Like Jesus, we should seek to give up our opinions and deliberations. Perfect freedom is only in obedience to the will of the Father. All else is slavery to the forces of darkness.
Logged

KYPIOCIHCOYCXPICTOC
BJohnD
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 213


St. John of Damascus, pray for us.


« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2005, 08:24:35 PM »

Thanks for posting the review.  I've read some secular reviews that aren't nearly so positive, but as they say, consider the source.

Here's a recent profile of Ms. Rice that ran in the LA Times.  Methinks she's no "Trad"!   Grin

From the Los Angeles Times
Twists of faith
Anne Rice's vision of Christianity is reflected in her new book.
By Anne-Marie O'Connor
Times Staff Writer

December 26, 2005

WHEN bestselling novelist Anne Rice was a good Catholic girl growing up in New Orleans, she dreamed of becoming a leader of the church. Instead, she abandoned Catholicism at 18 and stopped believing in God. She joined the Haight-Ashbury hippie milieu and evolved into the bestselling author who elevated the sexually ambiguous vampire Lestat to cult status. She wrote pornography under one pen name and erotica under another.

Now, she has come full circle — and in a weird way, may finally be getting her childhood wish.

Rice has written a novel on the boyhood of Jesus called "Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt." It is a bestseller. It has given her a high profile in the religious press and a platform for her ardently reformist views on the future of Christianity.

Her views will not please all of the devout. Rice favors gay marriage. She believes the church position regarding birth control is a grievous error that is not supported by Scripture. She repudiates what she sees as intolerant, "sex-obsessed" church leaders, and says she does not find support in the message of Jesus for their focus on sexual orientation or abortion. She argues for a more inclusive church.

"Think of how the church bells would ring and the pews would fill if women could become priests and priests could marry. It would be the great resurgence of the Catholic Church in this country," Rice said recently, seated in front of a roaring fire, in the La Jolla mansion she moved to after she left New Orleans.

Even Rice's new home has a monastic air. Saints on pedestals raise their arms to the sunlight that streams down on them from high windows. Gilt wood mingles with furniture deeply carved with learned robed men and other baroque motifs. The Pacific Ocean shimmers below. Here, as the Christian press besieges her with interview requests and urges readers to form study groups to read her book, Rice is revealing her own message about Jesus.

"He doesn't say anything about abortion," Rice said. "He doesn't say anything about gays. I abhor abortion too. But to make Christianity rise and fall on these issues is a great distortion of Christ's message."

The reception in the religious community to her book has been positive, though not unanimously so — a few religious bookstores have refused to stock or advertise "Christ the Lord." "Christianity Today" published a warm profile of Rice, "Interview With a Penitent," a tone that is echoed by conservative commentators who praise Rice for vividly bringing to life a 7-year-old boy named Jesus.

"This is a conversion story on the level of Augustine," said Christian columnist David Kuo, a former aide to President Bush who was the deputy director of the White House's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. "Anne Rice was a daughter of darkness."

"Rice sold [millions of] books that explored the darkest realms of the spiritual world," Kuo wrote in an online column for beliefnet.com. "She dressed all in black. She glorified the night and her atheism. But look at pictures of her now…. Look most of all at the sparkle in the eyes — at the light. It isn't the Bible, but it is inspired by God."

But St. Augustine renounced his earthly "sins." Rice, 64, isn't renouncing anything. She's proud of her son, novelist and gay activist Christopher Rice, who lives in West Hollywood.

The Broadway-bound musical of her work, "Lestat," opened in San Francisco the weekend before Christmas, with a score co-written by AIDS activist Elton John, who exchanged vows with his longtime partner in London last week.

To Rice, the path from the Vampire Chronicles to Jesus was steps on a continuous lifelong spiritual quest, which, like a seemingly predestined love, has led her to this moment, to fulfill her role as a modern "apostle" of Jesus.

Her God, she said, "is all-merciful, all loving."

Fascination with Jesus

AS Rice immerses herself in Scripture, many of the things she finds there do not jibe with the dictates of the Vatican or conservative Christians. Like many modern scholars of the Koran, Rice is pointing to her religion's holy book itself to criticize what she views as its misuse to justify long-held cultural practices.

For example, she said, there is no biblical dictate forbidding women to use birth control.

"I think that's a mistaken notion," she said. "There's a lack of vision about how much better the world would be if women could control their reproductive rights. We have all these street children in underdeveloped countries. We have to bring these countries into the modern era. I think the church has been sex-obsessed too long."

Rice says her fascination with Jesus began with a devoutly Catholic girlhood. Born Howard Allen O'Brien in October 1941, Rice grew up on the edge of New Orleans' Garden District, where "my environment was just saturated with religion," Rice said, her gaze direct and forceful under a gray bob reminiscent of silent movie star Louise Brooks. "The great thing about a childhood like that was everything had meaning."

As a child, Rice said, "I felt the love of God. I wanted to be a priest. When I found out that being a girl meant I couldn't be, I was so disappointed. I didn't understand why."

When Rice went away to Texas Woman's University in 1959, she found that the church's rigid doctrine was at odds with the growing complexities of her new life. "My background was so sheltered it didn't seem to sit with the modern world," Rice said. "I felt I had to deal with my faith and reconcile it with the world around me. My childhood was very sex-obsessed and repressed. I felt when I accepted a world without God, I accepted reality, and stopped believing in illusion."

Rice also viewed church dictates on sin to be harsher to women, though "I have never taken misogyny personally," she added briskly. "Most people hate women, including women. There are reasons: Fear of women, of the power to give birth."

Instead, she became fascinated with the existentialists, reading Sartre and Camus. She met Stan Rice, a poet, artist and atheist, and they married in 1961.

Rice's husband, who was on his way to becoming an acclaimed poet, enrolled at San Francisco State University, where he would eventually chair the creative writing department. They moved to the Haight-Ashbury, but when their apartment filled with hippies, "I was the square. All around me people were taking acid. I had no intention of ever taking it."

Still, "It was a fascinating time to be alive," she said. "All of these people rejecting secular materialism. They did not believe in greed and vanity. Even taking drugs, they were destroying their ego. A lot of Christ imagery cropped up."

Then the Rices were dealt a mortal blow: Their daughter, Michele, born in 1966, died of leukemia at 5. Stunned with grief, Rice sat down and began to write. Five hazy weeks later, she says, she finished a first draft of "Interview With the Vampire."

"I think that book perfectly reflected the grief I felt about my daughter and the Catholic Church," Rice said. "I wrote an incredibly strange novel about a vampire seeking God, trying to find out if he was a child of God or a child of Satan. I was seeking answers. It's a strange novel because it's so nihilistic, yet it's filled with potentially redemptive issues.

"You can save yourself with art to some extent. With art, you can cull all your answers into a magnificent synthesis."

The book made Rice a nationally known author. The Rices moved back to New Orleans, where she began her road back to God. It began with small questions: The complexity of the world hinted to her of a greater plan. She delved deeper into her fascination with the contributions of Judaism to world culture. By the time she and her husband remarried in the Catholic Church in New Orleans, in 1998, she was already thinking of writing about Jesus. Then in 2002, her husband died of a brain tumor, ending a 41-year marriage she says was "a love affair until the day he died."

That year, Rice was praying at New Orleans' voluptuously beautiful St. Mary's Assumption Church, and "I realized I didn't have to write the books I had been writing forever."

Praying to Christ, she told him, "Thy will be done. I'm going to write about you. I'm going to be your apostle." She finished the first Christ book just before she moved to La Jolla in March 2005.

Rice realizes some people think she's lost it.

"People perceive that I'm putting my whole career at risk," she said. "I don't care if my books don't sell."

But at a time when Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" has marked a resurgence in fascination with Jesus, "The Da Vinci Code" has become a cultural phenomenon, and the movie version of C.S. Lewis' Narnia chronicles has even Hollywood celebrities opining on the Gospel, Rice's book made it onto the bestseller lists. Perhaps that should not be a surprise in a country in which as many as nine out of 10 people say they believe in God — but it was to Rice. "I expected to be diminished and ignored, but I never expected to be embraced," she said.

'I want to speak out'

WHETHER her unorthodox opinions on the church will be embraced is another matter.

"I think it's sad that the strident voices of Christianity have cemented in the public mind that we are dumb," she said. "I feel I have to play my role as an artist and creator. But like many Christians, I want to speak out for what I believe in."

Her son, Christopher, a slender, delicate-looking 27-year-old, said he knew his mother had gone back to the church and was writing a fictional biography of Jesus, but "I didn't realize she decided to dedicate her work to Jesus Christ until she told a real estate agent in La Jolla a year ago. I was in the room. I was like, 'Oh.' "

Since then, "people have come up to me to express their sympathies and condolences, because they assume it goes hand in hand with homophobia, and I'm gay," he said, with evident amusement. But "in Leviticus, Jesus himself didn't say anything about homosexuality."

Christopher did not have a religious upbringing. He attended an Episcopal grade school after his family moved back to New Orleans when he was 10, and then a Jewish high school, but "my dad was a total Bible Belt atheist."

He believes his mother's books have always wrestled with spiritual issues, but "it wasn't taken seriously, vampires discussing faith and spirituality and religion," he said. "What people don't seem to understand is she explored the darker side of the spiritual realm because she thought there might be some truth there, not to hurt people. Even in her erotica, she says she went there to explore whether there was a spiritual dimension in the flesh. It's part of the same search.

"A lot of her darkness came out of losing Michele, her daughter, a huge spiritual loss," he said. "It wasn't an adolescent wandering. There was something much greater behind it: If there is a God, why did he take a 5-year-old daughter from me?"

By the time Rice returned to the church, she said, she had realized that she could embrace her faith without answering all the questions about how it fit into her life. For one thing, her studies of the Scripture have convinced her that many church dictates were created by mortals, not God.

Rice thinks one of the most prominent women in the Bible, Mary Magdalene, for example, was shortchanged by a patriarchal church that for years underplayed her role and defamed her, until recent years, as a prostitute.

"It didn't have a damn thing to do with Scripture," Rice said vehemently. "All we know is that she saw the rising of Christ before anyone else, and she was at the foot of the cross. She was probably an apostle. All the stuff about prostitution was folklore and misogyny."

She believes the Vatican's birth-control ban too is a patriarchal anachronism. "It was an obvious advantage for men for women to be passive with regards to procreation," she said.

Such views are unlikely to endear her to people like the conservative Christian who e-mailed her that morning, saying: "You're a sexual libertine, and you just mouth words about abortion, and you don't really care."

"A very tiny minority of Christian e-mails are very negative," Rice acknowledged. "Those people can be very un-nice. For them, loving Jesus does not mean loving anyone else, apparently."

In some ways, Rice's criticisms of religious fundamentalism are part of a wider backlash coming from such unlikely quarters as former President Carter, who, in his new book, criticizes religious fundamentalists' involvement in national politics and takes issue with the Catholic Church's exclusion of women from the priesthood.

Rice believes that conservative Christian politicians are distorting Christ's message by politicizing such issues as abortion. While abortion is "tragic," Rice said, "Millions of women are having abortions. They have control of their reproductive powers, and they do not want to relinquish that control. Abortion is at the heart of that, because it's at the core of women having control of who they are. I think it's killing. But I think it's a woman's choice."

Gay marriage, she said, "is another classic example. It can only strengthen our society to have gay people in committed relationships rather than going to bars."

She said the church sex scandal has unfairly focused on homosexuality rather than the true culprit, pedophilia. "The sex scandal has set us back on gay rights. Call off this homosexual thing: It's molesting children."

The religious attacks on gays, to Rice, get to the heart of the flaws she sees in modern religion: the scapegoating of those deemed "sinners." Jerry Falwell's statement blaming gays, lesbians, abortion providers and feminists for the Sept. 11 attacks, she said, "was a dreadful thing to say. It's so crazy to say God will punish our enemies."

Christ, she said, was "the ultimate scapegoat."

"The mystery of that is so vast," she said earnestly. "It's almost like he showed us the story so we could understand, what it's all about, and stop doing it to people.

"People are always going to misuse things. And some Christians are going to misuse Christianity. They are going to use Christianity to hit someone over the head because they frighten them or threaten them," she said. "We Christians have to get back to our roots as a people of love. Now we're associated with a religion of intolerance and hate. We have to come forward and speak about love."

Today, Rice said, she believes in God in the most literal sense. "I think he's transgender, but it's easier for me to think of him as a man because of acculturation," she said. She believes in the afterlife "absolutely … I feel it profoundly. I felt it as a child. I'm certain of it now. There's no conflict in me. It's a fleeting fear that it may not be so. I always thought that it was completely logical we were immortal, even as an atheist. The energy has to go somewhere."

She fully expects to meet her husband and her little girl in the afterlife. But "I think a lot about how we live here now. I think about how to live, how Christ wants me to live.

"I think he wants me to tell his story. I think he wants of all of us that we love and that we share," she said, as she prepared to travel to Jerusalem on Tuesday to research her next Christ book.

"Love your neighbor and know God. It's a serious command."

Logged
KATHXOYMENOC
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 147



« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2005, 10:19:07 PM »

Thanks for posting the review.  I've read some secular reviews that aren't nearly so positive, but as they say, consider the source.

Here's a recent profile of Ms. Rice that ran in the LA Times.  Methinks she's no "Trad"!   Grin

From the Los Angeles Times
Twists of faith
Anne Rice's vision of Christianity is reflected in her new book.
By Anne-Marie O'Connor
Times Staff Writer

December 26, 2005

I'm not sure I trust the liberal L.A. Times to print full in-context comments, so maybe Rice is the way this article portrays her ... and maybe she's not. I hope she continues her way back to Jesus.

Re: the book: The "Author's Note" at the end of the book should be read first to understood her conversion/return to faith and why the story is the way it is. She covered a lot of theological reading in preparation for it.

Maybe her experience of a Divine Liturgy might whet her curiosity for the Orthodox faith.... We can pray.  Smiley
« Last Edit: December 29, 2005, 10:23:43 PM by KATHXOUMENOC » Logged

KYPIOCIHCOYCXPICTOC
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2006, 06:35:54 PM »


Probably the best place for her to be. Liberal Modernists we do not need.
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2006, 09:14:08 PM »

Probably the best place for her to be. Liberal Modernists we do not need.

That's not very nice... Undecided
Logged
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2006, 10:12:57 PM »

That's not very nice... Undecided

Why? Do we need them?
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Arystarcus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 836


« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2006, 11:01:14 PM »

Why? Do we need them?

If the Orthodox Church is the true Church and Orthodoxy is the true faith, then even though you may feel that the Church does not need them perhaps they may need the Church??
Logged
Landon77
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA (Antiochian Western Orthodox in exile)
Posts: 308


« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2006, 11:02:53 PM »

Why? Do we need them?
I'm thankful I didn't have to be too useful or perfect prior to being recieved into the Orthodox Church- I'd still wouldn't be fully Orthodox.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2006, 11:03:34 PM by Landon77 » Logged

"How stands your mighty god? My God is stronger than he."  -St. Boniface
Silouan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 818

Bogurodzica dziewica zbaw nas


« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2006, 12:50:11 AM »

And I thought all along the Church was the hospital to which all may come and find salvation...
Logged
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2006, 10:07:42 PM »

If the Orthodox Church is the true Church and Orthodoxy is the true faith, then even though you may feel that the Church does not need them perhaps they may need the Church??

That is of course MOST TRUE! But she, like most of us, would have to leave alot of baggage at the door. (based on reading what she believes).
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2006, 10:08:49 PM »

And I thought all along the Church was the hospital to which all may come and find salvation...

IT IS....but she hasn't shown interest in riding in our ambulance yet. Wink
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2006, 10:09:46 PM »

I'm thankful I didn't have to be too useful or perfect prior to being recieved into the Orthodox Church- I'd still wouldn't be fully Orthodox.

No one is perfect, not one. Yeah I recall that. Roll Eyes
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2006, 11:56:24 PM »

IT IS....but she hasn't shown interest in riding in our ambulance yet. Wink

You sure?  She seems like she's at least contemplating it a little.  We can pray this becomes "a lot".
Logged
Carpatho-Rusyn
Just Orthodox
Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 77


WWW
« Reply #21 on: January 20, 2006, 01:52:47 PM »

You sure?ÂÂ  She seems like she's at least contemplating it a little.ÂÂ  We can pray this becomes "a lot".

And THAT I will do.
Logged

Man, learn the sickness of thy soul, for without acknowlegdement of illness there is no healing....Christ alone can heal us, who sigh and pray to him with faith.
- St. Tikhon of Zadonsk
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.102 seconds with 48 queries.