Author Topic: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation  (Read 883 times)

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Offline platypus

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Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« on: June 20, 2018, 08:49:03 PM »
I bought this recently and it just came in the mail. I got the whole Bible, although I mainly bought it for the Old Testament which Fr. Nicholas translated from the LXX. Fr. Nicholas is the Roman Catholic chaplain at Oxford. (Interestingly, I'm pretty sure the last guy to singlehandedly translate the Bible was Fr. Ronald Knox, also the RC chaplain at Oxford.) Here are my initial impressions of the book.

What I like:
- The OT is translated from the LXX.
- The OT is written with each verse as one paragraph, a format I love.
- Psalm 151 is included, as is most of the deuterocanon.


What I don't really like:
- The NT is formatted with verse numbers like "1-6" then some text, "7-38" then some more text. No individual verse numbers.
- Only the Roman Catholic deuterocanonical books are included.
- The book itself is just big enough to be an awkward size, and the margins are huge. It could've been quite a bit smaller.
- It's only sold in England and shipping to the US is a little pricey.

The New Testament looks like it's missing the a handful of verses that are in the KJV but not in modern English Bibles. I don't know that this really matters, but it's worth mentioning.

I started on Genesis today and I'll update you guys with my impressions as I finish each book.
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Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2018, 10:32:05 PM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.
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Offline Agabus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2018, 09:32:15 AM »
- The NT is formatted with verse numbers like "1-6" then some text, "7-38" then some more text. No individual verse numbers.
To each their own. If you've got to have versification, as a familiar Bible reader I prefer something like that.

Quote
The New Testament looks like it's missing the a handful of verses that are in the KJV but not in modern English Bibles. I don't know that this really matters, but it's worth mentioning.
It means he's probably working with a better majority text.
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Offline Agabus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2018, 09:33:32 AM »
- It's only sold in England and shipping to the US is a little pricey.

LOL. I googled it and the result I found had a financing option.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline Luke

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2018, 09:44:17 AM »
 :laugh:
LOL. I googled it and the result I found had a financing option.

Offline Orthodox_Slav

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2018, 11:11:56 AM »
 I personally kinda like the sound of this bible :)
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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2018, 12:00:51 PM »
Sounds very interesting. I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned before. I saw someone commenting somewhere that he uses "creepy-crawlies" in the opening to Genesis, which I for some reason love.
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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2018, 04:24:14 PM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.
Yeah, that's no longer *supposed* to be free as someone mentioned it's on lulu now, though obviously there are loopholes.
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Offline Orthodox_Slav

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2018, 04:27:22 PM »
if its Septuagint OT and Byzantine or Slavic NT then its good!  ;)
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Offline Brilko

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2018, 04:29:51 PM »
Sounds very interesting. I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned before. I saw someone commenting somewhere that he uses "creepy-crawlies" in the opening to Genesis, which I for some reason love.

I must go listen to Boris the Spider now.

Offline platypus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2018, 11:36:46 PM »
Sounds very interesting. I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned before. I saw someone commenting somewhere that he uses "creepy-crawlies" in the opening to Genesis, which I for some reason love.

He uses the phrase quite a bit.

Genesis 1:26 in Fr. Nicholas' translation:
"And God said, 'Let us make humanity according to our image, and according to our likeness. And let them rule over the fishes of the sea, and the birds of the air, and the cattle, and over all the earth and all the creepy-crawlies that crawl upon the earth."

Asser has:
"And God said, Let Us make man according to Our image and according to Our likeness, and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the heaven, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over all the creeping things that creep upon the earth."

I didn't catch the word "humanity" until I was typing this. It makes sense in this context, but I really hope "Son of Man" later in the OT doesn't turn into "human child" or something like that.

Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.
Yeah, that's no longer *supposed* to be free as someone mentioned it's on lulu now, though obviously there are loopholes.

I wish he'd print it in one volume. I wonder why he hasn't?

I was going to buy Asser's but it's printed across 5 seperate volumes and ended up being more expensive than getting Fr. Nicholas' single-volume Bible from England. Now that I think about it, though, I don't really need my whole Bible in one volume. It's not like I'll ever be reading the whole thing in a day...

I have an old PDF copy although it's entirely too long to easily search or scroll through. First world problems.
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Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2018, 12:20:59 AM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.
Yeah, that's no longer *supposed* to be free as someone mentioned it's on lulu now, though obviously there are loopholes.
Whoops... That's fair. They should ask removal from Wayback Machine, in that case.
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Offline platypus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2018, 06:58:20 PM »
Finished Genesis today. It was a pretty smooth read. In a few places Fr. Nicholas uses distinctly British english, such as the word "chap" instead of "man", but on the whole it flowed pretty well.

One thing I thought was interesting was his translation of Genesis 2:17. Fr. Nicholas writes, "but from the tree of knowing good and evil you shall not eat; on the day when you (plur.) eat of it, you (plur.) shall die the death."

Asser has "but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, ye shall not eat of it; but in whatsoever day ye shall eat thereof, by death shall ye die."

I never thought about it much before, but the move to modern english means that in order to distinguish between you singular and you plural, one actually has to write it out, as Fr. Nicholas does. Unless you want to use "y'all" for you plural, which is probably fine for a study bible but might be inappropriate for liturgical use.

All in all, I enjoyed the translation of Genesis and found it to be very readable. The footnotes were excellent, mostly comments about the translation or to identify parts of the text not found in the Masoretic Text. I appreciated the lack of doctrinal commentary.
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Offline Orthodox_Slav

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2018, 07:14:34 PM »
Finished Genesis today. It was a pretty smooth read. In a few places Fr. Nicholas uses distinctly British english, such as the word "chap" instead of "man", but on the whole it flowed pretty well.

One thing I thought was interesting was his translation of Genesis 2:17. Fr. Nicholas writes, "but from the tree of knowing good and evil you shall not eat; on the day when you (plur.) eat of it, you (plur.) shall die the death."

Asser has "but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, ye shall not eat of it; but in whatsoever day ye shall eat thereof, by death shall ye die."

I never thought about it much before, but the move to modern english means that in order to distinguish between you singular and you plural, one actually has to write it out, as Fr. Nicholas does. Unless you want to use "y'all" for you plural, which is probably fine for a study bible but might be inappropriate for liturgical use.

All in all, I enjoyed the translation of Genesis and found it to be very readable. The footnotes were excellent, mostly comments about the translation or to identify parts of the text not found in the Masoretic Text. I appreciated the lack of doctrinal commentary.

this bible sound interesting i don't always agree with the word choice but the study notes sound quite nice
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Offline HardHead

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2018, 05:05:31 AM »
I bought this recently and it just came in the mail. I got the whole Bible, although I mainly bought it for the Old Testament which Fr. Nicholas translated from the LXX. Fr. Nicholas is the Roman Catholic chaplain at Oxford. (Interestingly, I'm pretty sure the last guy to singlehandedly translate the Bible was Fr. Ronald Knox, also the RC chaplain at Oxford.) Here are my initial impressions of the book.

Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.

I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.

I think I may try the Fr. Nicholas LXX (the paperback version on the Canadian amazon seems cheaper?). From this post, it seems like it may be good.

I'm particularly interested in how Daniel translates. Any thoughts on that yet?

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2018, 08:09:38 AM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.
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Offline Agabus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2018, 10:30:38 AM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

The worst is when you run into well-known phrases like, "What is man that you are mindful of him" rendered as "what are human beings that you are mindful of them?"

Theologically and anthropologically fine, but tin to the ear.

I don't mind a few awkward workarounds since all translations have them.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 10:31:02 AM by Agabus »
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline HardHead

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2018, 02:08:02 PM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

Its not any one specific passage but at times I find the thou/thee kind of language in the RSV more difficult to read especially in Psalms than a more modern sounding English.Some examples of differences between RSV and NRSV are provided below as taken from my BibleWorks 8 software.

I'm not advocating NRSV at all nor am I trying to open a debate regarding which is more correct or better but to me personally the NRSV is easier to read at times. Which is better for study is up to you, your priest, and what you understand when praying.

For me the combination of the two is good. I would not ever give up the RSV for the NRSV. Personally, I think the RSV is more correct but its not as easy to read as the NRSV. Personally, I also do not mind inclusive language at all; however, meaning can be somewhat different depending on language.. Others may think otherwise.

Some quotes for comparison ...

When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars that you have established;  4 what are human beings that you are mindful of them, mortals that you care for them? 5 Yet you have made them a little lower than God, and crowned them with glory and honor. 6 You have given them dominion over the works of your hands; you have put all things under their feet, 7 all sheep and oxen, and also the beasts of the field, 8 the birds of the air, and the fish of the sea, whatever passes along the paths of the seas. 9 O LORD, our Sovereign, how majestic is your name in all the earth!  (Psa 8:3-9 NRSV)
 
When I look at thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars which thou hast established; 4 what is man that thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that thou dost care for him? 5 Yet thou hast made him little less than God, and dost crown him with glory and honor. 6 Thou hast given him dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet, 7 all sheep and oxen, and also the beasts of the field, 8 the birds of the air, and the fish of the sea, whatever passes along the paths of the sea. 9 O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is thy name in all the earth! (Psa 8:3-9 RSV)
 
4 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, 5 in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children.6 And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, "Abba! Father!" 7 So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God. 8 Formerly, when you did not know God, you were enslaved to beings that by nature are not gods. 9 Now, however, that you have come to know God, or rather to be known by God, how can you turn back again to the weak and beggarly elemental spirits? How can you want to be enslaved to them again? (Gal 4:4-9 NRSV)

But when the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, 5 to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons. 6 And because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, "Abba! Father!"7 So through God you are no longer a slave but a son, and if a son then an heir. 8 Formerly, when you did not know God, you were in bondage to beings that by nature are no gods; 9 but now that you have come to know God, or rather to be known by God, how can you turn back again to the weak and beggarly elemental spirits, whose slaves you want to be once more? (Gal 4:4-9 RSV)


Offline HardHead

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2018, 03:17:54 PM »
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

You may also consider the following additional quotes for comparison. Some of these passages are sited as being perhaps controversial in the NRSV due to their theological impact vs being 'simply' a matter of style if that casual observation makes any sense.

Again, I am not advocating anything relative to any bible translation, in particular not the NRSV, nor do I have an intention of hijacking this thread with these posts. Please pray and talk to your priest before deciding on this topic.

Another comparison ...

16 "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life. (Joh 3:16 NRSV)

16 For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. (Joh 3:16 RSV)

13 As I watched in the night visions, I saw one like a human being coming with the clouds of heaven. And he came to the Ancient One and was presented before him.14 To him was given dominion and glory and kingship, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him. His dominion is an everlasting dominion that shall not pass away, and his kingship is one that shall never be destroyed.
(Dan 7:13-14 NRSV)

13 I saw in the night visions, and behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a son of man, and he came to the Ancient of Days and was presented before him.14 And to him was given dominion and glory and kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed.
(Dan 7:13-14 RSV)
 
Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions.2 Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin.
3 For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me.4 Against you, you alone, have I sinned, and done what is evil in your sight, so that you are justified in your sentence and blameless when you pass judgment.5 Indeed, I was born guilty, a sinner when my mother conceived me.
6 You desire truth in the inward being; therefore teach me wisdom in my secret heart.7 Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.(Psa 51:1-7 NRSV)
 
Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy steadfast love; according to thy abundant mercy blot out my transgressions.2 Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin! 3 For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me.4 Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done that which is evil in thy sight, so that thou art justified in thy sentence and blameless in thy judgment.5 Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me.6 Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward being; therefore teach me wisdom in my secret heart. 7 Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.(Psa 51:1-7 RSV)
 
1 John 2:1 My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous;2 and he is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. 3 Now by this we may be sure that we know him, if we obey his commandments.4 Whoever says, "I have come to know him," but does not obey his commandments, is a liar, and in such a person the truth does not exist;5 but whoever obeys his word, truly in this person the love of God has reached perfection. By this we may be sure that we are in him:6 whoever says, "I abide in him," ought to walk just as he walked.(1Jo 2:1-6 NRSV)

1 John 2:1 My little children, I am writing this to you so that you may not sin; but if any one does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous;2 and he is the expiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.3 And by this we may be sure that we know him, if we keep his commandments.4 He who says "I know him" but disobeys his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him;5 but whoever keeps his word, in him truly love for God is perfected. By this we may be sure that we are in him:6 he who says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.(1Jo 2:1-6 RSV)

For contrast, note that the more protestant-oriented translation in the ESV reads like this ...

1 John 2:1 My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.2 He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.3 And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments.4 Whoever says "I know him" but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him,5 but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him:6 whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.(1Jo 2:1-6 ESV)

 
 






« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 03:26:18 PM by HardHead »

Offline platypus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2018, 10:57:07 AM »
I took entirely too long to finish Exodus. Please excuse my tardiness.

A few things stood out:
1) Fr. Nicholas points out in the footnotes many of the differences between the LXX and the Masoretic text. Most of them seem small, but occasionally there's LXX readings that seem pretty starkly different. Here's two from Exodus:

Exodus 4:25 Fr. Nicholas King Bible
"And Zipporah took a sharp stone, and cut off her son's foreskin, and fell at his feet, and said, 'The blood of my son's circumcision has stopped.'
The ESV translates Zipporah's remark from the MT as:
"Surely you are a bridgroom of blood to me."

The other major difference was in Exodus 21:22-25, the famous "eye for eye and tooth for tooth" bit. In the MT it says to punish someone who hurts a pregnant woman the same way that he hurt her. In the LXX it says to punish a person who hurts a pregnant woman in the same way that he hurt the baby.

2. The footnotes are really a mixed bag. Sometimes they're extremely insightful and give interesting tidbits about the underlying Greek, but other times the footnotes seem to be laments that the text doesn't match up with his morals. The footnote for the afformentioned "eye for eye" verse, for example, complains that the woman isn't considered at all in the LXX version. Instead of celebrating the fact that it does consider the unborn child.

All in all, it has been an excellent read so far. I'm glad to be able to read the septuagint version of the scriptures without learning Greek.
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Vanity of vanities, saith the preacher; all is vanity. -Ecclesiastes 12:8

Offline Volnutt

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #20 on: August 28, 2018, 11:44:19 AM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

The worst is when you run into well-known phrases like, "What is man that you are mindful of him" rendered as "what are human beings that you are mindful of them?"

Theologically and anthropologically fine, but tin to the ear.

Hah, I just now realized how well that fits with your avatar.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 11:44:43 AM by Volnutt »
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline juliogb

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2018, 01:40:16 PM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.

Would be nice a portuguese translation of the LXX, it is a huge project, and certainly would bring a lot of reactions in the biblical publishing world.

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #22 on: August 28, 2018, 02:08:58 PM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.

Would be nice a portuguese translation of the LXX, it is a huge project, and certainly would bring a lot of reactions in the biblical publishing world.
Some Brazilian Protestant (or non-denominational? idk, we've only chatted once or twice) called José Cassais translates one online, google "Bíblia Online SNT". It's amateur, therefore far from perfect, and still incomplete, but it's acceptable.

There's a version made by an American Evangelical called Timothy Allen Barber, and it's as awful as it can get... Not sure why he did it, maybe he was trying to practice both his Greek and his Portuguese? He published the second tome and claims to be finishing the first one, maybe he already did. But it's close to useless, so don't even bother looking around since there's Cassais to fill in a gap and you know English.

There's a Portuguese Hellenist called Frederico Lourenço who has been fashioning a full, professional, translation. It'll probably be close to the original Greek, but he's completely ignorant on theology and incredibly arrogant. He even claims there isn't such a thing as Biblical Greek. Metropolitan Damascene of Coimbra, of the non-canonical Lusitanian Orthodox Church, a very educated man in Scriptures, theology, Portuguese and Greek, read his New Testament and absolutely hated it.

And then there are me and my endless project of translating the Psalms.  :laugh:
« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 02:10:36 PM by RaphaCam »
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

May the Blessed Light shine Forth

Offline juliogb

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #23 on: August 28, 2018, 03:04:49 PM »
Wow, thanks, had no idea this version existed. Recovered Michael Asser's Bible today earlier from the Wayback Machine, since it had been taken down apparently.

Would be nice a portuguese translation of the LXX, it is a huge project, and certainly would bring a lot of reactions in the biblical publishing world.
Some Brazilian Protestant (or non-denominational? idk, we've only chatted once or twice) called José Cassais translates one online, google "Bíblia Online SNT". It's amateur, therefore far from perfect, and still incomplete, but it's acceptable.

There's a version made by an American Evangelical called Timothy Allen Barber, and it's as awful as it can get... Not sure why he did it, maybe he was trying to practice both his Greek and his Portuguese? He published the second tome and claims to be finishing the first one, maybe he already did. But it's close to useless, so don't even bother looking around since there's Cassais to fill in a gap and you know English.

There's a Portuguese Hellenist called Frederico Lourenço who has been fashioning a full, professional, translation. It'll probably be close to the original Greek, but he's completely ignorant on theology and incredibly arrogant. He even claims there isn't such a thing as Biblical Greek. Metropolitan Damascene of Coimbra, of the non-canonical Lusitanian Orthodox Church, a very educated man in Scriptures, theology, Portuguese and Greek, read his New Testament and absolutely hated it.

And then there are me and my endless project of translating the Psalms.  :laugh:

I found this José Cassais dude on FB, looks like some sort of real non-denominational protestant, intellectual sort of guy that is tired of all denominations, but I could be wrong. I made a quick research about his LXX translation, looks ok for an amateur endeavor.

Do you guys know the Sir Brenton Lancelot LXX translation? Is it reliable?

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #24 on: August 28, 2018, 04:15:28 PM »
Do you guys know the Sir Brenton Lancelot LXX translation? Is it reliable?
It's beautiful and theologically reliable, but not the most faithful one to the Greek text. The best one in my experience is NETS, although it's more Hellenistic than Christian in some aspects.
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

May the Blessed Light shine Forth

Offline Agabus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2018, 05:31:38 PM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

The worst is when you run into well-known phrases like, "What is man that you are mindful of him" rendered as "what are human beings that you are mindful of them?"

Theologically and anthropologically fine, but tin to the ear.

Hah, I just now realized how well that fits with your avatar.

I laid the groundwork nine (?) years ago so I could strike when the time was right.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2018, 06:36:53 PM »
I use the Oxford Annotated Bible RSV and NRSV as well as the OSB and another NRSV I got a couple of years ago for its larger print. So far, the RSV has been best for me with OSB and NRSV as supplement when RSV sounds awkward at times.
I'm curious what sections in the Bible sound awkward to you when using the RSV translation. I have avoided the NRSV for the longest time because of inclusive language, but I might consider looking at it again.

The worst is when you run into well-known phrases like, "What is man that you are mindful of him" rendered as "what are human beings that you are mindful of them?"

Theologically and anthropologically fine, but tin to the ear.

Hah, I just now realized how well that fits with your avatar.

I laid the groundwork nine (?) years ago so I could strike when the time was right.

Your life's work is complete. Well done, thou good and faithful servant.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline Iconodule

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #27 on: August 29, 2018, 06:41:47 PM »
What is that contraption? I assumed it was some sort of one-man band device but on closer inspection it seems like something else.
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Offline Volnutt

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #28 on: August 29, 2018, 06:43:54 PM »
What is that contraption? I assumed it was some sort of one-man band device but on closer inspection it seems like something else.

I think it's an exceptionally Rube Goldberg-y hearing aid.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #29 on: August 29, 2018, 09:15:17 PM »
What is that contraption? I assumed it was some sort of one-man band device but on closer inspection it seems like something else.

I think it's an exceptionally Rube Goldberg-y hearing aid.

I'm not really sure, TBH. I just lifted the image from Married to the Sea years ago.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline juliogb

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2018, 07:11:58 AM »
Do you guys know the Sir Brenton Lancelot LXX translation? Is it reliable?
It's beautiful and theologically reliable, but not the most faithful one to the Greek text. The best one in my experience is NETS, although it's more Hellenistic than Christian in some aspects.

Do you have the orthodox study bible? I am quite interested in acquiring one.

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2018, 01:06:56 PM »
Do you guys know the Sir Brenton Lancelot LXX translation? Is it reliable?
It's beautiful and theologically reliable, but not the most faithful one to the Greek text. The best one in my experience is NETS, although it's more Hellenistic than Christian in some aspects.
Do you have the orthodox study bible? I am quite interested in acquiring one.
Do, it's the best we have. I own one, it has some gaps, but it's a great tool.
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

May the Blessed Light shine Forth

Offline juliogb

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2018, 03:01:52 PM »
Do you guys know the Sir Brenton Lancelot LXX translation? Is it reliable?
It's beautiful and theologically reliable, but not the most faithful one to the Greek text. The best one in my experience is NETS, although it's more Hellenistic than Christian in some aspects.
Do you have the orthodox study bible? I am quite interested in acquiring one.
Do, it's the best we have. I own one, it has some gaps, but it's a great tool.

How do you got one?

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #33 on: August 30, 2018, 03:09:55 PM »
Amazon, I think.
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

May the Blessed Light shine Forth

Offline Agabus

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #34 on: August 30, 2018, 03:15:12 PM »
Amazon, I think.

<insert Brazil/Amazon joke here>
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Fr. Nicholas King LXX translation
« Reply #35 on: August 30, 2018, 03:17:35 PM »
Amazon, I think.
<insert Brazil/Amazon joke here>
There's no joke, I literally snatched it from the lost Orthodox kingdom of Holyrussiã, hidden behind layers of northern savages.
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

May the Blessed Light shine Forth