Author Topic: To what extend did Christ take on our fallen human nature?  (Read 166 times)

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Offline LivenotoneviL

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To what extend did Christ take on our fallen human nature?
« on: February 03, 2018, 02:49:34 PM »
This may seem like an easy question with an easy answer ("all of it!"), but due to a discussion on a Catholic forum, I realized my own understanding of this dogmatic fact (sadly, one of the most important in Christianity) is flawed, and I would like to get a more correct outlook on it.

For example, was Christ capable of being tempted towards sin - did He ever have thoughts about the possibility of sinning? To what extent did Christ's fallen human nature differ from ours?

Thanks.

(The title should say "extent.")
« Last Edit: February 03, 2018, 02:49:52 PM by LivenotoneviL »
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Online Vanhyo

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Re: To what extend did Christ take on our fallen human nature?
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2018, 03:00:31 PM »
There was never anything fallen in Christ, he took our nature without any sin or fault

Also Christ cannot be tempted.

Offline Volnutt

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Re: To what extend did Christ take on our fallen human nature?
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 03:03:19 PM »
I think with the temptations, the issue is that English has lost a semantic distinction (though I'm not sure about the exact Greek or Aramaic). That there's a difference between being tempted and being overcome with temptation or falling into temptation. Jesus was the former but not the later since God is not tempted by evil (James 1:13).

So, I think what that means for the desert is something like: Satan psychologically assaulted Him for 40 days, but Jesus never really gave a passing thought to taking the offers.

In more day to day terms it would be something like: Jesus knew what was it was like to have a human sex drive, but He was never "torn" as to whether He should give in to lust or not. So, He assumed our humanity in a "blameless passions" sense, as Severus of Antioch put it, but never assumed anything sinful about us.

Kind of a tough one to parse and I'm still not sure I like the logic of the temptations vis a vis Hebrews 4:15, but it seems more or less consistent.
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