Author Topic: Lectio Divina  (Read 892 times)

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Offline Agabus

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Lectio Divina
« on: December 11, 2017, 03:30:18 PM »
Can someone point me to a good (free) explanation of what the Benedictine practice of lectio divina actually entails?

Every reference to it I find seems to indicate it's reading the scriptures with meditation, but doesn't really detail what that means in practice.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline Rohzek

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 03:56:16 PM »
Have you tried reading the Benedictine Rule itself? It should have some detail about that, at least.

http://www.osb.org/
"Il ne faut imaginer Dieu ni trop bon, ni méchant. La justice est entre l'excès de la clémence et la cruauté, ainsi que les peines finies sont entre l'impunité et les peines éternelles." - Denise Diderot, Pensées philosophiques 1746

Offline Agabus

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 04:14:21 PM »
Have you tried reading the Benedictine Rule itself? It should have some detail about that, at least.

http://www.osb.org/

I've read it. It mostly deals with the administration of the monastery. It's possible I skimmed over the pertinent passages since so much of the rule is, "don't let the monks have stuff," "the abbott is boss," "don't skip prayers," etc.

EDIT: I found a sort of Carmelite explanation, but I don't know if that's the same or if it's Benedictine-plus since the Benedictines are the base for all western monasticism but the Carmelites are a separate order.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 04:17:24 PM by Agabus »
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline Rohzek

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2017, 04:24:33 PM »
Have you tried reading the Benedictine Rule itself? It should have some detail about that, at least.

http://www.osb.org/

I've read it. It mostly deals with the administration of the monastery. It's possible I skimmed over the pertinent passages since so much of the rule is, "don't let the monks have stuff," "the abbott is boss," "don't skip prayers," etc.

EDIT: I found a sort of Carmelite explanation, but I don't know if that's the same or if it's Benedictine-plus since the Benedictines are the base for all western monasticism but the Carmelites are a separate order.

Might be worth looking at the Hildemar Project. Before orders became a thing, some Latin Christians wrote a commentary on the Rule to help explain its meaning. Try the search function under Text and see what happens.

http://hildemar.org/
"Il ne faut imaginer Dieu ni trop bon, ni méchant. La justice est entre l'excès de la clémence et la cruauté, ainsi que les peines finies sont entre l'impunité et les peines éternelles." - Denise Diderot, Pensées philosophiques 1746

Offline Arachne

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2017, 04:37:57 PM »
Can someone point me to a good (free) explanation of what the Benedictine practice of lectio divina actually entails?

Every reference to it I find seems to indicate it's reading the scriptures with meditation, but doesn't really detail what that means in practice.

This is the best breakdown I've been able to find: http://www.beliefnet.com/faiths/catholic/2000/08/how-to-practice-lectio-divina.aspx
'Evil isn't the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as evil, maybe more so, and it's a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against stupid. That might actually make a difference.'~Harry Dresden

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Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2017, 04:38:58 PM »
Can someone point me to a good (free) explanation of what the Benedictine practice of lectio divina actually entails?

Every reference to it I find seems to indicate it's reading the scriptures with meditation, but doesn't really detail what that means in practice.

I found this helpful back in the day. 
Mor Ephrem is a nice guy.  Just say sorry and it will all be ok. Say I had things that were inside troubling me but I didn't know how to express appropriately. I will not behave that way again but I am seeking help.

thank you so much Mor ephrem you are a hero!

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2017, 05:27:32 PM »
I had a professor who had us practicing this, and I would try to summarize, but others have already provided far superior resources. Be aware the practice is not as ancient as "Benedictine" may lead one to believe, or so we were told.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Agabus

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2017, 05:45:01 PM »
I had a professor who had us practicing this, and I would try to summarize, but others have already provided far superior resources. Be aware the practice is not as ancient as "Benedictine" may lead one to believe, or so we were told.

I was just curious since I've seen online references to it ranging from  "basically just reading the Bible" to "using the Bible for centering prayer" to "more dangerous than Dungeons and Dragons!!1!"

"Benedictine" as received today is going to be much more polished than, say, what we read about the saint's monasteries in Pope St. Gregory's dialogues. I would assume practices as such would be acquired or reshaped by the millennia. A rock in a moving stream can be smoothed on one side while growing moss in the lee.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline WPM

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2017, 06:52:15 PM »
I'll do that WITH you, ... Not against you.
Learn meditation.

Offline Arachne

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2017, 07:29:21 PM »
Another take, longer and from an Anglican perspective, here. (Fr. Christopher Jamison's book is excellent, as well, for a lot more than this element.)
'Evil isn't the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as evil, maybe more so, and it's a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against stupid. That might actually make a difference.'~Harry Dresden

~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox ~

Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2017, 07:45:40 PM »
I'll do that WITH you, ... Not against you.

 8)
Mor Ephrem is a nice guy.  Just say sorry and it will all be ok. Say I had things that were inside troubling me but I didn't know how to express appropriately. I will not behave that way again but I am seeking help.

thank you so much Mor ephrem you are a hero!

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2017, 07:51:34 PM »
I had a professor who had us practicing this, and I would try to summarize, but others have already provided far superior resources. Be aware the practice is not as ancient as "Benedictine" may lead one to believe, or so we were told.

I was just curious since I've seen online references to it ranging from  "basically just reading the Bible" to "using the Bible for centering prayer" to "more dangerous than Dungeons and Dragons!!1!"

"Benedictine" as received today is going to be much more polished than, say, what we read about the saint's monasteries in Pope St. Gregory's dialogues. I would assume practices as such would be acquired or reshaped by the millennia. A rock in a moving stream can be smoothed on one side while growing moss in the lee.

At this particular, progressive Evangelical, school it did come with a hipster frisson. I think that vibe just goes off when an Evangelical feels he's departing from his own tradition. The professor puts on a rakish air and the girls' eyebrows go up, so the boys adjust their beanies and look sanctimonious. There was nothing objectionable to my recollection: seemed perfectly practical actually.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 07:55:22 PM by Porter ODoran »
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Agabus

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2017, 08:56:28 PM »
I had a professor who had us practicing this, and I would try to summarize, but others have already provided far superior resources. Be aware the practice is not as ancient as "Benedictine" may lead one to believe, or so we were told.

I was just curious since I've seen online references to it ranging from  "basically just reading the Bible" to "using the Bible for centering prayer" to "more dangerous than Dungeons and Dragons!!1!"

"Benedictine" as received today is going to be much more polished than, say, what we read about the saint's monasteries in Pope St. Gregory's dialogues. I would assume practices as such would be acquired or reshaped by the millennia. A rock in a moving stream can be smoothed on one side while growing moss in the lee.

At this particular, progressive Evangelical, school it did come with a hipster frisson. I think that vibe just goes off when an Evangelical feels he's departing from his own tradition. The professor puts on a rakish air and the girls' eyebrows go up, so the boys adjust their beanies and look sanctimonious. There was nothing objectionable to my recollection: seemed perfectly practical actually.

I resemble that remark 14 years ago.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Offline Sharbel

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2017, 12:56:00 AM »
EDIT: I found a sort of Carmelite explanation, but I don't know if that's the same or if it's Benedictine-plus since the Benedictines are the base for all western monasticism but the Carmelites are a separate order.
If you mean as written by a Carmelite friar, such as this, yes, it's the same as the Benedictine practice.
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Offline Agabus

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Re: Lectio Divina
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2017, 01:27:33 AM »
EDIT: I found a sort of Carmelite explanation, but I don't know if that's the same or if it's Benedictine-plus since the Benedictines are the base for all western monasticism but the Carmelites are a separate order.
If you mean as written by a Carmelite friar, such as this, yes, it's the same as the Benedictine practice.
Yeah, something similar.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Take a breath, read Ecclesiastes 1:9.