Author Topic: Aramaic vs Greek  (Read 903 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline youssef

  • Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 389
Aramaic vs Greek
« on: November 24, 2017, 08:25:47 AM »
I was reading a little for the scholar who consider that the original language of the new testament was Aramaic and not Greek. They have some good argument specially the idiom.

The most dangerous idea is that the meaning of the new testament will change if we consider thet it is originally writing in aramaic.

here is the problem does the meaning of the new testament will change if we consider the original language is aramaic and not Greek?


Offline Nicodemusz138

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 76
  • Faith: Just Christian
  • Jurisdiction: None for now
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2017, 08:41:21 AM »
I was reading a little for the scholar who consider that the original language of the new testament was Aramaic and not Greek. They have some good argument specially the idiom.

It's called the "Aramaic Primacy", it is well known already, and I have heard of it sometimes, it should not be confused with the "Hebrew Gospel" Hypothesis or the "Q source" theory.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aramaic_New_Testament

From what I have seen, the majority of the Aramaic Primacy advocates are mostly on the Internet... because literally everyone else concludes that the New Testament was indeed written in Koine Greek of course with some semitisms.

here is the problem does the meaning of the new testament will change if we consider the original language is aramaic and not Greek?

Ummm... no?, the majority of New Testament dialogue was indeed originally spoken in Aramaic, it was just translated and then written in Greek years later, I think that is the same thing as if I write here in English the dialogue I had with some school friends in my native language some years ago?

The closest to a change I could think of is that the internet is full of Judaizer/Hebrew Roots/Sacred Name websites insisting that the NT was indeed written in Jesus' Yahshua's native Aramaic before those evil Greek Pagans/Neoplatonists/Polytheists corrupted it!, but this still would not change anything.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 08:51:57 AM by Nicodemusz138 »
May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all. - 2 Corinthians 13:14

Offline Luke

  • Formerly Gamliel
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,379
  • Ευλογημένη Σαρακοστή
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Metropolis of San Francisco
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2017, 11:56:06 AM »
Here is the problem: does the meaning of the new testament will change if we consider the original language is aramaic and not Greek?
No.  It is the same Gospel no matter what language it was first written in.

Offline Porter ODoran

  • St. John the Beloved, pray for me
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,135
  • Monahos.net: "Lawful Evil"; OC.net: "Chaotic Evil"
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: GOAA
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2017, 12:16:36 PM »
Ummm... no?, the majority of New Testament dialogue was indeed originally spoken in Aramaic, it was just translated and then written in Greek years later, I think that is the same thing as if I write here in English the dialogue I had with some school friends in my native language some years ago?

Very perceptive.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Taxiarches
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,796
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Antiochian Patriarchate/POC
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2017, 01:03:03 PM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

Anyway, it's comfortabel for me to read both Old and New Testament in Arabic, I see more, as it's a very close language to Aramaic and Hebrew.
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Volnutt

  • Dull Sublunary Lover
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 15,089
  • too often left in the payment of false ponchos
  • Faith: Evangelical by default
  • Jurisdiction: Spiritually homeless
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2017, 01:08:35 PM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

You mean Aramaic? Why would it have been written in Arabic?
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Taxiarches
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,796
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Antiochian Patriarchate/POC
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2017, 01:18:55 PM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

You mean Aramaic? Why would it have been written in Arabic?

Sure, I eman Aramaic. I live too much by my Arabic studies, I guess :P
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Volnutt

  • Dull Sublunary Lover
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 15,089
  • too often left in the payment of false ponchos
  • Faith: Evangelical by default
  • Jurisdiction: Spiritually homeless
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2017, 02:57:11 AM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

You mean Aramaic? Why would it have been written in Arabic?

Sure, I eman Aramaic. I live too much by my Arabic studies, I guess :P

No problem. I know the feeling!


Question for anybody: Are Aramaic and Syriac mutually intelligible?
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline Porter ODoran

  • St. John the Beloved, pray for me
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,135
  • Monahos.net: "Lawful Evil"; OC.net: "Chaotic Evil"
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: GOAA
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2017, 04:16:07 PM »
Question for anybody: Are Aramaic and Syriac mutually intelligible?

I'd be curious just to know what modern usage of the two terms categorizes. In the past, they've frequently been interchangeable. Oh, and also Chaldean.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Taxiarches
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,796
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Antiochian Patriarchate/POC
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2017, 04:17:51 PM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

You mean Aramaic? Why would it have been written in Arabic?

Sure, I eman Aramaic. I live too much by my Arabic studies, I guess :P

No problem. I know the feeling!


Question for anybody: Are Aramaic and Syriac mutually intelligible?

As far I know, Aramaic uses a modified Hebrew alphabet, while Syriac its own (however, procceding from the Hebrew one).
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Volnutt

  • Dull Sublunary Lover
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 15,089
  • too often left in the payment of false ponchos
  • Faith: Evangelical by default
  • Jurisdiction: Spiritually homeless
Re: Aramaic vs Greek
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2017, 08:52:41 AM »
In some liturgical books there is written that st. Matthew's Gosple has been originally written in Arabic, but it's lost, so we have only its Greek translation.

You mean Aramaic? Why would it have been written in Arabic?

Sure, I eman Aramaic. I live too much by my Arabic studies, I guess :P

No problem. I know the feeling!


Question for anybody: Are Aramaic and Syriac mutually intelligible?

As far I know, Aramaic uses a modified Hebrew alphabet, while Syriac its own (however, procceding from the Hebrew one).

Well, it doesn't seem too hard to just learn a second alphabet, I was think spoken as much as written.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.