Author Topic: Paschal Rush service  (Read 840 times)

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Offline kuddes6

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Paschal Rush service
« on: June 06, 2017, 09:28:50 PM »
Hey, a quick question from a n00b Orthodox: what is the origin and/or meaning of the term "Rush" regarding the rush service at Pascha?

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2017, 05:25:50 AM »
Perhaps rushing to the empty tomb.
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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2017, 02:04:19 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.
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Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2017, 02:08:12 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Or this...
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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2017, 02:10:23 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Or this...


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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2017, 02:15:45 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Or this...

Well, I meant this
and this
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Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2017, 02:22:11 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Or this...

Well, I meant this
and this

I knew that!   :-*
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The erection of one’s rod counts as a form of glory (Theophylaktos of Ohrid, A Defense of Eunuchs, p. 329).

Offline kuddes6

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2017, 04:47:20 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2017, 05:12:03 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

Slavic does not mean only "Russian". Anyway, in Slavic tradition this part of Paschal service is called "zautrenia", it means "before-matins" or "before the dawn".
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

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Offline kuddes6

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2017, 06:04:29 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

Slavic does not mean only "Russian". Anyway, in Slavic tradition this part of Paschal service is called "zautrenia", it means "before-matins" or "before the dawn".

Oh dear, I was afraid that my humor would go over like a lead balloon. I'm aware of all that, I was making a bad pun for humor. Pray for me... 😃

Offline Dominika

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2017, 06:37:11 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

Slavic does not mean only "Russian". Anyway, in Slavic tradition this part of Paschal service is called "zautrenia", it means "before-matins" or "before the dawn".

Oh dear, I was afraid that my humor would go over like a lead balloon. I'm aware of all that, I was making a bad pun for humor. Pray for me... 😃

Being a Polish Orthodox, I'm very vulnerable to assigment Orthodox (the best) traditions to Russians :P
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Luke

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2017, 07:16:58 PM »

Offline kuddes6

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2017, 09:29:15 PM »


I won't deny that my first Pascha liturgy this year did seem like it was 2112 hours 😋

Offline kuddes6

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2017, 09:31:13 PM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

Slavic does not mean only "Russian". Anyway, in Slavic tradition this part of Paschal service is called "zautrenia", it means "before-matins" or "before the dawn".

Oh dear, I was afraid that my humor would go over like a lead balloon. I'm aware of all that, I was making a bad pun for humor. Pray for me... 😃

Being a Polish Orthodox, I'm very vulnerable to assigment Orthodox (the best) traditions to Russians :P

Wow, that's cool, I mean I haven't been Orthodox long, but I've never met any Polish Orthodox. As a convert from Catholicism, I will say that the Poles seemed to be among the most zealous Catholics, I bet you have your work cut out for you

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2017, 10:21:27 AM »
In Slavic tradition it's not named "rush". But in the Arabic one, indeed, it's  هجمة - hajme, meaning  an attack. I think it's related to the last part of this service: opening of the door with priest shouting "Let the King of the Glory may enter" and knocking (or even hiting) the door of the church 3 times.

Got it, so you're saying it doesn't have a "Rushian" origin?

Slavic does not mean only "Russian". Anyway, in Slavic tradition this part of Paschal service is called "zautrenia", it means "before-matins" or "before the dawn".

Oh dear, I was afraid that my humor would go over like a lead balloon. I'm aware of all that, I was making a bad pun for humor. Pray for me... 😃

Being a Polish Orthodox, I'm very vulnerable to assigment Orthodox (the best) traditions to Russians :P

Wow, that's cool, I mean I haven't been Orthodox long, but I've never met any Polish Orthodox. As a convert from Catholicism, I will say that the Poles seemed to be among the most zealous Catholics, I bet you have your work cut out for you

We, Polish Orthodox, form an autocephalus Church ;) But yeah, tehre are very few Polish Orthodox in US, and there are no Polish Orthodox parishes - Orthodox people of Polish descent attend various jurisdictions.
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline CarolS

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Re: Paschal Rush service
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2017, 01:31:16 PM »
I have only heard this term in the Greek Church. I always understood it to mean that the service was performed more quickly than a normal Liturgy.  Of course, this might not be the case in a monastery, where the Paschal Liturgy could extend all the way till dawn.
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