Author Topic: Re: Original Sin  (Read 782 times)

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Offline mcarmichael

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Re: Original Sin
« on: July 06, 2016, 11:13:53 PM »
Please share your thoughts and comments on this topic here.

I feel like that term probably wouldn't have meant much to anyone, even in the 2nd temple period. How does the Orthodox (Christian) concept of sin differ from "Canonical" Judaism (to coin a phrase?)

I was thinking how could the Blessed Virgin have kept the law through her entire life, and it occurred to me that she might have had some help.

ty
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Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Original Sin
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2016, 11:42:46 PM »
Judaism has undergone massive seachanges throughout its 4,000 year history. Thus, to talk of a "canonical Jewish" definition of sin is not possible. That said, it is of course possible just to take the Hebrew Scriptures at their face-value and do some collating of definitions. Notice I use the plural, because even then we won't find any monolithic meaning. One emphasis in the Hebrew Prophets was on sin as iniquity, inequity. That the poor and fatherless and immigrants (strangers) are heard by Jehovah and that his wrath has become uncontainable, and will result in a proper judgment for iniquity, i.e., the violent fall of the oppressive order. Another emphasis, particularly in the psalms and proverbs, is of sin as opposite to "straightness," being plumb, uprightness, i.e., righteousness. In such a view of sin, being unpredictable, as in untrustworthy to men and unfaithful to God, is contrasted with the virtue of steadfastly predictable honesty, faith, consistent generosity, and courage of principles. Another idea of sin I can think of in the Hebrew Scriptures is that of sinful people as stubborn, ungrateful children, angering and sorrowing God, abandoning their ancestors and Zion at the drop of a hat ...
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

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Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Original Sin
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2016, 12:06:36 AM »
It might be worth noting here that the Seventy seemed to see enough connection between sin and the Platonic conception of ἁμαρτία (strategic error [i.e., with life-affecting implications], not without guilt) that they chose ἁμαρτία many times in their translation. In my opinion, the Orthodox view hews closely to Plato (e.g., that sin is a guilty error men make because they heed the passions rather than the nous) while placing it in the large context of a man-and-God timeline and universe.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2016, 12:09:48 AM by Porter ODoran »
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Wanderer276

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Re: Original Sin
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2017, 01:45:37 AM »
We are all in our 'fallen nature' and attempting to regain our likeness to Christ through our earthly struggle.....

Offline WPM

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Re: Original Sin
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2017, 04:27:19 AM »
Sin borne of ancestral curse.(Or original sin caused from disobedience of Adam and Eve)
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Offline BCsenior

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Re: Original Sin
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2017, 03:39:58 PM »
I was thinking how could the Blessed Virgin have kept the law through her entire life,
and it occurred to me that she might have had some help.

In the old covenant, several were said to have satisfied God.
My favorites are Zach and Liz.
IMO, this was achieved by having humble and contrite hearts,
and by doing lots of repenting!
« Last Edit: April 22, 2017, 03:40:47 PM by BCsenior »
Jesus says, “If you love Me, keep My commandments.” (John 14:15, 21, 23, 24)
Jesus says, “if anyone keeps My word, he shall never see death.” (John 8:51)
Jesus says, “My sheep … follow me. And I give them eternal life” (John 10:27-28)
Jesus says, “this is eternal life, that they may know … Jesus Christ” (John 17:3)
John says, “we know Him, if we keep His commandments.” (1 John 2:3)
Does anyone go to heaven who does not love Jesus, and know Him, and follow Him,
and keep His commandments?