OrthodoxChristianity.net
August 28, 2014, 07:25:41 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: If I become Orthodox, would I still be able to teach theology?  (Read 1888 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
StGeorge
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 707


St. George


« on: August 16, 2005, 12:36:14 AM »

I hope that you don't take this thread in the wrong way.  I begin my M.A. in Theology program next fall at Franciscan University of Steuebenville.  It is my ultimate hope to teach theology at a Catholic university or college.  However, I might also teach theology at a Catholic high school.  Whatever the case, I plan to teach at a Catholic school.  Now, I say "plan" because I am aware that the next two years will be a time of great spiritual challenge and change, and that my planning my change depending on new circumstances.  ÃƒÆ’‚  

While at Franciscan, I plan to attend a nearby OCA parish in order to get better acquainted with the Orthodox church through its worship.ÂÂ  At the same time, I hope to study Western theology so as to get better acquainted with my roots, and to see for myself the truth of the matter about Roman Catholicism.ÂÂ  Right now I am leaning more in the direction of Orthodoxy than Roman Catholicism.ÂÂ  However, I cannot in good conscience jump over to the Orthodox Church without a firmer conviction, which I might gain by studying Western theology, doctrinal developments, etc.ÂÂ  Since Franciscan University of Steuebenville is very concerned with following what the Roman Catholic Church really teaches, I will be in a better position to compare Orthodoxy with Roman Catholicism (as taught from the Vatican).ÂÂ  

Enough of this preface.ÂÂ  My basic question is: if I do indeed become a teacher at a Catholic school, and if I decide to convert to Orthodoxy, would I still be able to teach in some capacity at a school with Roman Catholic affiliations?ÂÂ  Now, I understand that there are many variables.ÂÂ  If I teach at a Catholic high school, I am almost certain that I would not be able to teach theology there if I become Orthodox.ÂÂ  But what if I become a theology professor at a Catholic university which is not strongly committed to teaching everything as taught by the Vatican?ÂÂ  Would I be able to continue teaching courses on Western theology if I taught the material as the perspective of the Catholic Church, and not necessarily as the truth?ÂÂ  

Does anybody here know of an Orthodox Christian who teaches theology at a non-Orthodox school?ÂÂ  I know that Jaroslav Pelikan converted to Orthodoxy, but is he still teaching at Yale?  I am by no means comparing myself with Jaroslav Pelikan!  Right now I am far less wise than that man; but I do desire to teach others, and with a good conscience. 

My future plans are subject to change, but I like to plan ahead for the many possibilities which are before me.ÂÂ  I also have thought about the priesthood, but I first need to determine what I truly believe to be true before making any decision on thatÂÂ  Smiley
« Last Edit: August 16, 2005, 12:42:06 AM by StGeorge » Logged
FrChris
The Rodney Dangerfield of OC.net
Site Supporter
Taxiarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 7,252


Holy Father Patrick, thank you for your help!


« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2005, 12:44:25 AM »

Actually, this is interesting to me in particular, as teaching theology at a Catholic high school is a career path that has been proposed to me.

I'm not going to get all personal regarding why, but recently an individual who would know has pointed out that Orthodox theological school graduates often wind up teaching for Catholic high schools. Basically the credentials are accepted, especially if the high school has a conservative leaning (but not so conservative that it sees the Orthodox as schismatic) administration.

I probably will be finding out more about this when I return to Holy Cross, and if you are interested I will try to let you know more as I get more information.
Logged

"As the sparrow flees from a hawk, so the man seeking humility flees from an argument". St John Climacus
dantxny
OC.net Mineshaft gap
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Russian
Posts: 769



« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2005, 01:01:18 AM »

I know that Fordham University has two Greek Orthodox Professors Dr Aristotle Papanikou and Dr. George Democopulos.  In addition, I believe it is also fixing to get a professor from St. Vladimir. 
I know University of Dallas has a professor with SSPX and another one that's eastern but I don't remember if he's Catholic or Orthodox.  Also, I know the first three men are theology professors.  I do not know about UD.  I'll ask someone there.
Logged

"If you give the average Frenchman a choice between a reforming president who would plug the country's huge deficit and a good cheese, he would probably opt for the cheese." - Stephen Clarke
I think the French may be on to something here.
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2005, 01:44:47 AM »

Hieromonk Alexander Golitzin teaches "Religion" (I don't know what classes exactly) at Marquette (a Catholic University I think).
Logged
SeanMc
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 203


« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2005, 02:16:49 AM »

I think a better question would be, If I become Orthodox, should I teach false doctrine? If you taught religion in a Catholic university or high school you would have to teach it as true, but if you worked as a secular university, you would not.

So I would answer that it is possibly compromising to teach at a Catholic university, while teaching at a secular university would be fine. Now if you stayed Catholic, and taught Catholicism as truth in a Catholic university, would of course, be fine.

Now there are some canonical implications for you to teach at a Catholic university. Canon 812 says, "Those who teach theological subjects in any institute of higher studies must have a mandate from the competent ecclesiastical authority." Now, to gain a mandatum, you have to be in full communion with the Catholic Church and write a letter to the competent ecclesiastical authority saying so. Here's more information: http://www.usccb.org/bishops/mandatumguidelines.shtml

That website contains a sample mandatum draft, which I shall reproduce here:

Attestation of the Professor of Catholic Theological Disciplines

I hereby declare my role and responsibility as a professor of a Catholic theological discipline within the full communion of the Church.

As a professor of a Catholic theological discipline, therefore, I am committed to teach authentic Catholic doctrine and to refrain from putting forth as Catholic teaching anything contrary to the Church's magisterium.


_____________________________
PLACE



_____________________________
SIGNATURE



_____________________________
DATE


Logged
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2005, 06:42:42 AM »

I do know that at least one priest from ACROD has taught at Duquesne University and one of our own members here is a GO priest teaching currently at that same university.
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Armando
Dead among the living
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 187

I gave up dreaming a long time ago...


« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2005, 07:26:39 AM »

My personal point of view, if you are an RC theologian, converting to EO is dangerous. But still, if all Christians avoided
the danger of converting to Christianity, there would be no saints and no martyrs so if that is what you want and you
believe it's worth the risk... go for it!
Logged

Ten years have passed, the girl I loved
is now a woman, but I am still a child...
-Sad-ending fairytale, Miltos Paschalidis
dantxny
OC.net Mineshaft gap
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Russian
Posts: 769



« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2005, 09:56:05 AM »

One thing that could be added though, at A RC University one can often get away with teaching other theology more than one would be able to in say Protestant.  Worse case, there are always comparitive religions.  Also, get tenured and write your own course.  I know Prof. Demacopulos did that at Fordham with Byzantine Theology and it is one of the if not the most popular classes.
Logged

"If you give the average Frenchman a choice between a reforming president who would plug the country's huge deficit and a good cheese, he would probably opt for the cheese." - Stephen Clarke
I think the French may be on to something here.
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2005, 12:44:58 PM »

Quote
Also, get tenured and write your own course.  I know Prof. Demacopulos did that at Fordham with Byzantine Theology and it is one of the if not the most popular classes.

I just wanted to say how awesome this is Smiley it's a good way to look at it really, and approach the idea of teaching at a Catholic University.
Logged

hmmmm...
StGeorge
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 707


St. George


« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2005, 01:52:19 PM »

Quote
Originally Quoted by SeanMc:

I think a better question would be, If I become Orthodox, should I teach false doctrine? If you taught religion in a Catholic university or high school you would have to teach it as true, but if you worked as a secular university, you would not.

I believe that is the major question I am asking.  Thank you.   I have actually started a thread simililar to this one on a Catholic forum, and I am finding to my surprise that many Catholic high schools have lowered their standards and are now hiriing theology teachers who do not teach everything according to Vatican teaching.     

To be honest, there are many Catholic universities which although in name are Catholic are no longer Catholic in their teaching curriculum, and are little different from secular universities in the theology taught there.  Most Catholic universities are transferring administrative posts from Catholic clergy to lay people.  That's how I perceive things anyhow.  I know that it is the case of Protestant colleges.  I went to Elizabethtown College, which was established as a religious college by the Church of the Brethren, but when I began there it was for all purposes a secular institution with only tangenital links with the Church of the Brethren, as the emphasis on Christ was almost nonexistent, in my own opinion. 

Quote
Originally Quoted by SeanMc:

Now there are some canonical implications for you to teach at a Catholic university. Canon 812 says, "Those who teach theological subjects in any institute of higher studies must have a mandate from the competent ecclesiastical authority." Now, to gain a mandatum, you have to be in full communion with the Catholic Church and write a letter to the competent ecclesiastical authority saying so. Here's more information: http://www.usccb.org/bishops/mandatumguidelines.shtml

Interesting.  I'll have to further look into that.  This makes me wonder: why are there Orthodox professors at Catholic universities then?  It is possible that the administrations of the various universities are lax in enforcing this canon. 

I appreciate your assistance!  Smiley
Logged
StGeorge
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 707


St. George


« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2005, 02:00:23 PM »

Quote
Originally Quoted by Armando:

My personal point of view, if you are an RC theologian, converting to EO is dangerous.


I am just curious as to why you think it is dangerous.  Do you think that it is less dangerous for a Lutheran, Reformed or Baptist theologian to convert to EO?  Huh  ÃƒÆ’‚Â

Just food for thought: According to Timothy Ware, there was a time when the Orthodox would send their students to Western universities for theological studies.ÂÂ  Is it therefore less dangerous for an Orthodox to study Roman Catholic theology and return to his homeland with it than it is for a Roman Catholic to study Roman Catholic theology, disagree with many of its methods, and embrace Orthodox methods?ÂÂ  

Thanks for answering these questions!ÂÂ  Grin
« Last Edit: August 16, 2005, 02:01:18 PM by StGeorge » Logged
choirfiend
ManIsChristian=iRnotgrEek.
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 903

Rachael weeping for her children, for they are not


« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2005, 02:12:26 PM »

I dont think either one is worse than the other--gaining a true appreciation and understanding of the teachings you reject is the best way to know whether or not they're false.
Logged

Qui cantat, bis orat
FrChris
The Rodney Dangerfield of OC.net
Site Supporter
Taxiarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 7,252


Holy Father Patrick, thank you for your help!


« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2005, 02:22:06 PM »

Quote
I have actually started a thread simililar to this one on a Catholic forum, and I am finding to my surprise that many Catholic high schools have lowered their standards and are now hiriing theology teachers who do not teach everything according to Vatican teaching.


Yup...that came as a surprise to me as well when teaching at an RC high school was originally proposed to me.

Still..would any school ower their standards sufficiently to hire me?   Shocked

I think not!

Quote

Interesting. I'll have to further look into that. This makes me wonder: why are there Orthodox professors at Catholic universities then? It is possible that the administrations of the various universities are lax in enforcing this canon.

Indeed. At my local university which was founded by Marianists, the OCA priest here in town is an instructor specializing in Byzantine studies.
Logged

"As the sparrow flees from a hawk, so the man seeking humility flees from an argument". St John Climacus
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,444


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2005, 02:27:39 PM »

I have a vested interest in this as a recent graduate from an Orthodox seminary, and my opinion is that while it would not be optimum to teach theology in a Catholic institution, it would not be necessarily wrong because you could always make it clear that you are teaching Roman Catholic theology.  If you approach it in such an academic context I don't see the problem as it is important to have an understanding of other religious systems and so teaching this information is neutral.

Anastasios
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Disclaimer: Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodo
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.066 seconds with 40 queries.