Author Topic: What to make of being Orthodox? ...  (Read 1082 times)

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Offline WPM

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What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« on: October 30, 2015, 06:10:52 AM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.
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Offline Fabio Leite

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2015, 07:22:18 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2015, 07:49:48 AM by Fabio Leite »
Many Energies, 3 Persons, 2 Natures, 1 God, 1 Church, 1 Baptism, and 1 Cup. The Son begotten only from the Father, the Spirit proceeding only from the Father, Each glorifying the Other. The Son sends the Spirit, the Spirit Reveals the Son, the Father is seen in the Son. The Spirit spoke through the Prophets and Fathers and does so even today.

Offline hecma925

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2015, 07:47:14 AM »
The logic of history as such recapitulates the authentication of the image.
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

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Offline WPM

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2015, 08:25:21 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

Can a human be divine? ...
« Last Edit: October 30, 2015, 08:26:10 AM by WPM »
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Offline FinnJames

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2015, 08:42:26 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

This seems to fit both for Orthodox Christianity commenting on Buddhism ("Buddhists lack faith in Christ") and for Buddhism commenting on Orthodox Christianity ("Christians' fixation on Christ keeps them from searching for and finding a higher level").

Take away the mythological layer that includes Christology or Buddhology and creation/world development, remove the ritual layer of worship services, and there's quite a lot of common ground between the Christianity of the Philokalia and non-Tantric varieties of Buddhism. Perhaps more than adherents to either tradition are comfortable with since both traditions claim to uniquely hold the Truth.

Offline WPM

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2015, 08:44:48 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

This seems to fit both for Orthodox Christianity commenting on Buddhism ("Buddhists lack faith in Christ") and for Buddhism commenting on Orthodox Christianity ("Christians' fixation on Christ keeps them from searching for and finding a higher level").

Take away the mythological layer that includes Christology or Buddhology and creation/world development, remove the ritual layer of worship services, and there's quite a lot of common ground between the Christianity of the Philokalia and non-Tantric varieties of Buddhism. Perhaps more than adherents to either tradition are comfortable with since both traditions claim to uniquely hold the Truth.

Such as the main difference between Christians and Buddhists? ...
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Offline IoanC

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2015, 09:01:55 AM »
They can be honest attempts to be spiritual and have a God, but in the end they are not the true religion that God Himself left us. I would generally not demonize them, but as well see them for what they are.

Offline Ainnir

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2015, 07:35:19 PM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

I thoroughly appreciate this description.
Is any of the above Orthodox?  I have no clue, so there's that.

Offline LenInSebastopol

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2015, 10:06:17 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

This seems to fit both for Orthodox Christianity commenting on Buddhism ("Buddhists lack faith in Christ") and for Buddhism commenting on Orthodox Christianity ("Christians' fixation on Christ keeps them from searching for and finding a higher level").
Take away the mythological layer that includes Christology or Buddhology and creation/world development, remove the ritual layer of worship services, and there's quite a lot of common ground between the Christianity of the Philokalia and non-Tantric varieties of Buddhism. Perhaps more than adherents to either tradition are comfortable with since both traditions claim to uniquely hold the Truth.

And so C.S. Lewis did 'worry' about Buddhism.
My problem with it was that it was not human nor personal in nature, as found in Christianity
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Offline wgw

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2015, 10:20:00 AM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

Can a human be divine? ...

Yes.
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2015, 01:09:06 PM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.

I was an atheist for some time before returning to Christianity and was especially attracted to Hinduism for a couple of years.  It is a fascinating religion with real wisdom in it.  (I recommend a study of it, as well as all world religions and different branches of Christianity.  Deepens religious knowledge and perspective.) 

What drew me back to Christianity though was that I realized that Christianity is about (along with wisdom) love, mercy, redemption through suffering.  It is the only religion that in my mind actually explains the universe.  (I do think suffering is redemptive in that it purifies the human will - instills humility, mercy, love, gratitude.  People who have suffered greatly always seem to have greater humanity, vision, love.) 

Christianity is so "non-human" in its rejection of pride, will; its emphasis on God as love, infinite love.  Other worldly - a man could not have created it; who would nail his God (who is human and divine) on a cross, with a crown of thorns, forgiving his attackers?  These Eastern religions basically just want to escape suffering and go into nothingness.  Annihilate oneself, which makes perfect sense from the human perspective; they are "intelligent" religions, very intellectual, but the transcendence of spirit, soul, love, joy?   To me, it feels like a "No" rather than a "Yes"  to the beautiful gift of this life and to eternity, to God.
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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2015, 01:40:51 PM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.

I was an atheist for some time before returning to Christianity and was especially attracted to Hinduism for a couple of years.  It is a fascinating religion with real wisdom in it.  (I recommend a study of it, as well as all world religions and different branches of Christianity.  Deepens religious knowledge and perspective.) 

What drew me back to Christianity though was that I realized that Christianity is about (along with wisdom) love, mercy, redemption through suffering.  It is the only religion that in my mind actually explains the universe.  (I do think suffering is redemptive in that it purifies the human will - instills humility, mercy, love, gratitude.  People who have suffered greatly always seem to have greater humanity, vision, love.) 

Christianity is so "non-human" in its rejection of pride, will; its emphasis on God as love, infinite love.  Other worldly - a man could not have created it; who would nail his God (who is human and divine) on a cross, with a crown of thorns, forgiving his attackers?  These Eastern religions basically just want to escape suffering and go into nothingness.  Annihilate oneself, which makes perfect sense from the human perspective; they are "intelligent" religions, very intellectual, but the transcendence of spirit, soul, love, joy?   To me, it feels like a "No" rather than a "Yes"  to the beautiful gift of this life and to eternity, to God.
This thread isn't about what to make of being Christian in general; rather, it's about what to make of being specifically an Orthodox Christian.
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2015, 01:45:12 PM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.

I was an atheist for some time before returning to Christianity and was especially attracted to Hinduism for a couple of years.  It is a fascinating religion with real wisdom in it.  (I recommend a study of it, as well as all world religions and different branches of Christianity.  Deepens religious knowledge and perspective.) 

What drew me back to Christianity though was that I realized that Christianity is about (along with wisdom) love, mercy, redemption through suffering.  It is the only religion that in my mind actually explains the universe.  (I do think suffering is redemptive in that it purifies the human will - instills humility, mercy, love, gratitude.  People who have suffered greatly always seem to have greater humanity, vision, love.) 

Christianity is so "non-human" in its rejection of pride, will; its emphasis on God as love, infinite love.  Other worldly - a man could not have created it; who would nail his God (who is human and divine) on a cross, with a crown of thorns, forgiving his attackers?  These Eastern religions basically just want to escape suffering and go into nothingness.  Annihilate oneself, which makes perfect sense from the human perspective; they are "intelligent" religions, very intellectual, but the transcendence of spirit, soul, love, joy?   To me, it feels like a "No" rather than a "Yes"  to the beautiful gift of this life and to eternity, to God.
This thread isn't about what to make of being Christian in general; rather, it's about what to make of being specifically an Orthodox Christian.

Ah, good point.  My apologies.  I'll leave you to it.
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Offline FinnJames

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2015, 02:43:26 PM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

This seems to fit both for Orthodox Christianity commenting on Buddhism ("Buddhists lack faith in Christ") and for Buddhism commenting on Orthodox Christianity ("Christians' fixation on Christ keeps them from searching for and finding a higher level").
Take away the mythological layer that includes Christology or Buddhology and creation/world development, remove the ritual layer of worship services, and there's quite a lot of common ground between the Christianity of the Philokalia and non-Tantric varieties of Buddhism. Perhaps more than adherents to either tradition are comfortable with since both traditions claim to uniquely hold the Truth.

And so C.S. Lewis did 'worry' about Buddhism.
My problem with it was that it was not human nor personal in nature, as found in Christianity

Sorry, Len, but I'm having trouble understanding what you mean when you write that "it was not human nor personal in nature". Could you explain?

Offline LenInSebastopol

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2015, 05:29:51 PM »
A mix of excellent philosophy regarding human nature and the cosmos with human flawed attempts to understand the divine and a couple of demonic traps that prevent salvation.

This seems to fit both for Orthodox Christianity commenting on Buddhism ("Buddhists lack faith in Christ") and for Buddhism commenting on Orthodox Christianity ("Christians' fixation on Christ keeps them from searching for and finding a higher level").
Take away the mythological layer that includes Christology or Buddhology and creation/world development, remove the ritual layer of worship services, and there's quite a lot of common ground between the Christianity of the Philokalia and non-Tantric varieties of Buddhism. Perhaps more than adherents to either tradition are comfortable with since both traditions claim to uniquely hold the Truth.

And so C.S. Lewis did 'worry' about Buddhism.
My problem with it was that it was not human nor personal in nature, as found in Christianity

Sorry, Len, but I'm having trouble understanding what you mean when you write that "it was not human nor personal in nature". Could you explain?

Took formal classes in the 60's on Buddhism at State; also studied same prior to that...all the while there never was a personal nor caring God. Simple. It was all impersonal. Tough crunch, kiddo, none care.
Plus the Grand Muffin of it all, the Utmost was non-existence.......how can one love life and 'work' to be 'not'? Though all was based on personal suffering via desire, the best one could get was no-thing and that was working after many or at least several life-times.
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Offline biro

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2015, 06:44:08 PM »
"Tough crunch, kiddo, none care."

Are you writing a song or something?  :o
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Offline Theophania

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2015, 08:46:28 PM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.

I was an atheist for some time before returning to Christianity and was especially attracted to Hinduism for a couple of years.  It is a fascinating religion with real wisdom in it.  (I recommend a study of it, as well as all world religions and different branches of Christianity.  Deepens religious knowledge and perspective.) 

What drew me back to Christianity though was that I realized that Christianity is about (along with wisdom) love, mercy, redemption through suffering.  It is the only religion that in my mind actually explains the universe.  (I do think suffering is redemptive in that it purifies the human will - instills humility, mercy, love, gratitude.  People who have suffered greatly always seem to have greater humanity, vision, love.)

Christianity is so "non-human" in its rejection of pride, will; its emphasis on God as love, infinite love.  Other worldly - a man could not have created it; who would nail his God (who is human and divine) on a cross, with a crown of thorns, forgiving his attackers?  These Eastern religions basically just want to escape suffering and go into nothingness.  Annihilate oneself, which makes perfect sense from the human perspective; they are "intelligent" religions, very intellectual, but the transcendence of spirit, soul, love, joy?   To me, it feels like a "No" rather than a "Yes"  to the beautiful gift of this life and to eternity, to God.

Lovely post. I especially liked the bolded.
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2015, 12:59:18 PM »
If this is Orthodox, as a genuine Christian experience, what to make of other religions like Hinduism or Buddhism? Wondering, thanks.

I was an atheist for some time before returning to Christianity and was especially attracted to Hinduism for a couple of years.  It is a fascinating religion with real wisdom in it.  (I recommend a study of it, as well as all world religions and different branches of Christianity.  Deepens religious knowledge and perspective.) 

What drew me back to Christianity though was that I realized that Christianity is about (along with wisdom) love, mercy, redemption through suffering.  It is the only religion that in my mind actually explains the universe.  (I do think suffering is redemptive in that it purifies the human will - instills humility, mercy, love, gratitude.  People who have suffered greatly always seem to have greater humanity, vision, love.)

Christianity is so "non-human" in its rejection of pride, will; its emphasis on God as love, infinite love.  Other worldly - a man could not have created it; who would nail his God (who is human and divine) on a cross, with a crown of thorns, forgiving his attackers?  These Eastern religions basically just want to escape suffering and go into nothingness.  Annihilate oneself, which makes perfect sense from the human perspective; they are "intelligent" religions, very intellectual, but the transcendence of spirit, soul, love, joy?   To me, it feels like a "No" rather than a "Yes"  to the beautiful gift of this life and to eternity, to God.

Lovely post. I especially liked the bolded.

Thank you.
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Offline WPM

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Re: What to make of being Orthodox? ...
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2015, 02:08:41 PM »
Its not much fun becoming Orthodox if there are no people to congregate with (Or fraternize with) ...
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