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Author Topic: Obligatory HP VI Topic  (Read 5489 times) Average Rating: 0
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Keble
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« on: July 16, 2005, 09:18:17 PM »

I've finished it. I might have something to say once I can figure out how to say it without dropping a huge spoiler.
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« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2005, 04:37:36 PM »

can we just warn ahead that there are spoilers in the thread? or does that mean no one will read it...

i read it all yesterday....since we havent decided whether to include spoilers or not, i will try to say this as best as i can, and it's not going to be much because my reaction is very complicated and i havent fully sorted it out yet...i finished reading at 3 am last night (after reading all day), and once i was completely done, and realized there was no way out of what happened at the end, no magical loophole or whatever...i started crying and sobbing and couldnt stop (good thing my roommate's gone, and yes, books affect me like this)...but NOT because of the death (i cant count this as a spoiler because it seemed to be common knowledge that Rowling was killing off another major character, i of course wont say who)...no, not because of the death itself, which in retrospect i realize had to happen at some point (and with one book left, this is as good a place as any), but the *way* in which it came about (i.e. the "who" of how it came about, if that makes sense)...i was absolutely crushed, and still am, i cant explain it any further than that.

as far as a review goes, i mean, the book fully meets expectations for anyone who has read the last 5 and wants to know what happens next...i, however, am now looking forward to the 7th and final book (whenever it gets written, w/in next few years i hope) to see how Rowling rectifies what she has done to these characters...i am not blaming her, but rather fully trusting her (sound like a character we all know and love?) that she has a grand plan in mind, as she always seems to have, and she will not allow to happen what it seems she has allowed to happen to, well, the truth at the center of the series.

anyway, that's my 2 cents for now - cryptic, i know, but if we decide to include spoilers i will go into more detail...
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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2005, 12:12:04 AM »

hmm...i just wanted to update and say i am not as despairing as i was haha, there are some people on the 'net who are VERY good at theorizing about these books, and things dont look as bleak as they did. Smiley anyway, just throwin that out there.
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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2005, 03:41:38 PM »

Almost finished reading the book, myself.  I've also found a book called, "Finding God in Harry Potter" by John Granger (no relation to...lol)  Was surprised to find out he's Orthodox and a Greek Old Calendarist connected with St. Gregory Monastery in Etna, CA., and totally favorable with the series, as is his bishop.
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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2005, 04:56:22 PM »

WOW, that's something! An Orthodox Christian take on the HP series - I will definitely look into getting that book, thanx for sharing monkvasyl...and do let us know when you finish HBP and what you think Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2005, 08:41:34 AM »

Actually the name of the book is"  "Finding God in Harry Potter"  Also, here's a link to his site: 

http://www.hogwartsprofessor.com/home.php

I'm on page 505.  Great reading. 
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2005, 11:18:03 AM »

How sad that even "monks" have taken to Harry Potter.
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« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2005, 11:28:29 AM »

I'm on page 436... already having sneaking suspicions on who will die, but will go against my usual nature, and WILL NOT SKIP TO THE END...  I hope not anyway, it'd be a waste. 

Also, for anyone who can read Russian, Deacon Andrey Kuraev wrote favorably (or at least not unfavorably) about Harry Potter a few years ago.  Kuraev is a highly respected writer in Russian Orthodox circles.
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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2005, 01:10:09 PM »

How sad that even "monks" have taken to Harry Potter.

Not really...enough people have come to me asking my opinion on the subject.  It would be impossible to give one if I have not taken the time to read them.  I , personally, see nothing wrong with these books.  No one seems to be against the "Wizard of Oz", with its "good" and "bad" witches.  "The Lord of the Rings"  holds a high place for alot of people, but its too gory for me.  Now, "Charmed" is a series that frightens me...the craft is portrayed as a religion (Wicca) and demons can also be seen as some of the "good guys".  In Harry Potter I see the fight between good and evil.  Yes, some of the "good" characters do bad things, but they face the consequences for their actions.  I highly recommend, "Finding God in Harry Potter".  It has a quote from an Orthodox bishop favorable to the series.  But I nor that bishop, nor the author of that book speak for the Orthodox Church on the subject.
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« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2005, 01:41:04 PM »

The Bishop in question is a schismatic that is somewhat irrelevant (well expect perhaps to his flock of 20 or so - even a generous estimate of his entire's synod's flock is in the hundreds).  The pamplet here http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/cgi-bin/ccp51u/cp-app.cgi?usr=51F3377539&rnd=4234811&rrc=N&affl=&cip=&act=&aff=&pg=prod&ref=3HARRYEP1&cat=&catstr= gives another perspective.  While I don't nessasaserly agree that the book is entirely evil and without any good - I don't think it is something to take lightly.  There are other books written by authors who were devout Christians that are much better IMO for kids.  I.E. C.S. Lewis

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« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2005, 02:01:15 PM »

Silouan,

Please refrain from calling Archbishop Chrysostomos of Etna a schismatic without qualification.  This is a pan-Orthodox site.  Archbishop Chrysostomos of Etna is in full communion with ROCOR at least for the time being and as such if he is a schismatic, then so is ROCOR.  Besides, your personal opinion of Archbishop Chrysostomos is irrelevant to the discussion. Is what he says true or not? It ultimately does not matter if he has 20 people if he is right.

Anastasios
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« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2005, 02:13:55 PM »

Actually it was Bishop Auxentios of Photiki, who is quoted by John Granger in, "Finding God in Harry Potter", but I'm sure it was with the blessing of His Emenience. 

I have great respect for Archbishop Chrysostomos, as he treated my Bishop and I with frateral love and respect.  That was when I was under Bishop Savvas, who was with Metropolitan Pangratios.  Before the death of Bishop Savvas I was received into the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA.  I've obtained all my monastic robes from their convent, also in Etna.  The nuns' handwork is outstanding.
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« Reply #12 on: July 22, 2005, 02:21:59 PM »

Anastasios, the group that puts out the most rhetoric against the synod of Metropolitan Cyprian of Oropos is your own GOC of Archbishop Chysostomos of Athens.  The communion with ROCOR with the TOC is tenous at best....so I do think it is justified to call the TOC in a dubious state.  Well in one sence I agree that his information should be refuted on its own merit, I disagree with him being presented as an Orthodox authority.   
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« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2005, 03:26:54 PM »

The Bishop in question is a schismatic that is somewhat irrelevant (well expect perhaps to his flock of 20 or so - even a generous estimate of his entire's synod's flock is in the hundreds).ÂÂ  The pamplet here http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/cgi-bin/ccp51u/cp-app.cgi?usr=51F3377539&rnd=4234811&rrc=N&affl=&cip=&act=&aff=&pg=prod&ref=3HARRYEP1&cat=&catstr= gives another perspective.[/url]

A perspective which is alarmist. I'm not about to pay a dollar to read Would you like to Initiate Your Children to Satanism? and frankly, the title tells me that the author of the tract can't read. For instance: this quote from Rowling features prominently on the page: "I made a very conscious decision, right from the beginning, that I was writing about someone evil, and wasnt going to tell a lie." And who is she talking about? Not Harry!! Obviously (and it's not at all hard to track this down given that all of us have access to the internet, which for all its other limitations is the greatest gift to quote verification ever devised by man) she's talking about Voldemort, the chief bad guy. And you have to be really really really stupid-- or really evil in your heart-of-hearts-- not to catch on that Voldemort is evil and repugnant, willing to do almost any damage to his own soul in order to further his intent. There is nothing attractive about Voldemort; the most positive emotion that he can evoke is pity for the damage he has done to himself.

Quote
There are other books written by authors who were devout Christians that are much better IMO for kids.ÂÂ  I.E. C.S. Lewis

Rowling is a devout Christian, and her books, as Granger points out, teem with Christian ideas and imagery. I have nothing against Lewis, but I think that the Narnia books are for pretty young kids and that his greatest book by far, Til We Have Faces, would be condemned out of hand by the anti-Potter crowd if they did not know its author. After all, a pagan god is one of the supporting characters-- a speaking role, to boot!
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« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2005, 03:30:10 PM »

BTW, the sense I get from the exerpt from his book that you can find on-line is that Granger's book is a good starting point for learning to look for all the Christian symbolism, but that his analysis is a bit over the top.
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« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2005, 04:15:17 PM »

...Voldemort is evil and repugnant, willing to do almost any damage to his own soul in order to further his intent. There is nothing attractive about Voldemort; the most positive emotion that he can evoke is pity for the damage he has done to himself. 

That really comes out clear when Dumbledore is telling Harry about Voldermort and the Horcruxes.  Also, the physical description of Tom Riddle and his transformation into Voldermort, from handsome to, in my words, animalistic in appearance.  This clearly speaks of how sin corrupts our nature, turning the beauty created by God into something ugly. 

I'm now on page 530, should have it finished by Monday.  Then to read Granger's book.  If there's an interest I could start a thread on his book.
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« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2005, 04:50:02 PM »

Anastasios, the group that puts out the most rhetoric against the synod of Metropolitan Cyprian of Oropos is your own GOC of Archbishop Chysostomos of Athens.  The communion with ROCOR with the TOC is tenous at best....so I do think it is justified to call the TOC in a dubious state.  Well in one sence I agree that his information should be refuted on its own merit, I disagree with him being presented as an Orthodox authority.  ÃƒÆ’‚  

This has nothing to do with me, this is a pan-Orthodox website.  You are right, no one in the Etna group is an Orthodox authority. I am just saying referring to their status as a rather small Church is well, irrelevant.  Dubious I can agree with; outrightly calling them schismatic without qualification, no, I don't think we should do that here.

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« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2005, 07:34:05 PM »

Anastasios, I was more alarmed at the misrepresentation of calling the Etna group an Orthodox authority.  If say Metr. Herman or Archbishop Demetrios had made the statements then I would say that represents an Orthodox authority - as they have real flocks which they tend... sometimes Etna is more an academic institution than anything else. 

Keble, the tract I linked to was to show that the Etna viewpoint is far from the authoritative view within the Orthodox Church.  IME the view  of Orthodox Christians on HP is about like the general population: some think it is bad from a literary standpoint, some becuase  of the subject matter, while others love the books.  Personally I don't think the series is that good, nor that edifying - but I'm not about to go to any HP book burnings.     
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« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2005, 07:49:26 PM »

Anastasios, I was more alarmed at the misrepresentation of calling the Etna group an Orthodox authority.ÂÂ  If say Metr. Herman or Archbishop Demetrios had made the statements then I would say that represents an Orthodox authority - as they have real flocks which they tend... sometimes Etna is more an academic institution than anything else.ÂÂ  

Real Bishops generally dont have the time to write theological treatises on children's books...which is exactly what Harry Potter is, a Children's Book...no need to take it quite so seriously, it is not, nor was it ever intended to be, a theological work.

As far as 'Archbishop' Chrysostomos of Etna is concerned, I fear I dont see the difficulity of calling him a Schismatic, there is a very clear and simple definition of a 'Schismatic.' As I have said numerous times before, a 'Schismatic' is anyone who, not embracing any Heresies, caims (falsely, I might add) to be Orthodox, in spite of not maintaining communion with the Most Holy and Oecumenical Throne of Constantinople.

I really dont see the source of confusion here Wink
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« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2005, 09:16:41 PM »

Greekischristian,

This is a pan Orthodox website. We allow non-Chalcedonians and Chalcedonians to peacefully co exist so we are not about to stop Old Calendarists from posting by disrespecting their bishops. I don't mind if you two say "Schismatic according to the EP" but don't just say schismatic without qualification. This is a discussion site not representing any particular Orthodox jurisdiction and as such you need to learn how to talk to people who claim to be Orthodox and still disagree with you.

As far as putting the title in quotation marks, that's just asinine.  He is an Archbishop whether you like it or not, you don't have to believe he actually has grace or is Orthodox but he carries the title given by his Church and if you have any Christian decency you will simply give him the title he has.

Anastasios
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« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2005, 09:23:40 PM »

You know you're on an Orthodox forum when you can't even discuss a children's book without someone anathemizing someone.  Cheesy
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« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2005, 09:44:18 PM »

I think you have something there, OzGeorge.  Cheesy

And I shall attempt to *wrench* the thread back into line.  I haven't finished it yet (letting other members of the family read it first) but I *did* stay up too late last night with "one-more-chapter-itis"

Fred and George Wesley are still up to their usual tricks.  It *is* a darker story, but facing down evil isn't light. But I'm resisting the temptation to check the last pages.  I shall be good and just keep reading in the proper order.

Ebor
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« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2005, 11:36:49 PM »

Ok, I've got a question. What would you say is the most attractive aspect of the Harry Potter books? On the day (before) the new one was released, while I was at work we saw people lined up the whole way around the Barnes and Noble parking lot (which is quite large). What is so fascinating about these books? Is it something that you can put your finger on? My only experience with HP is seeing the first movie, which I didn't find particularly mesmerizing; but obviously the books have attracted a lot of loyal readers.


GIC,

Have you ever read Orthodoxy by G.K. Chesterton? It's interesting how fairy tales (or children's books) can influence a person's theological outlook... Smiley
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« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2005, 12:09:55 AM »

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Ok, I've got a question. What would you say is the most attractive aspect of the Harry Potter books? On the day (before) the new one was released, while I was at work we saw people lined up the whole way around the Barnes and Noble parking lot (which is quite large). What is so fascinating about these books? Is it something that you can put your finger on? My only experience with HP is seeing the first movie, which I didn't find particularly mesmerizing; but obviously the books have attracted a lot of loyal readers.

It's funny you ask this, because I was just trying to put my finger on this today while out to eat with a friend...for me it gets even more complicated when, from a purely academic, literary, English-major-snob type stand-point, the books are not particularly sophisticated or elegant. That being said, I am drawn to them like a bee to honey...why is this?

The best way for me to describe it is to say that the pure thing - the story, the truth at the center of the story, however you want to call it - the pure thing that these books contain is simply something I personally don't have access to anywhere else, with the important exception of church. It does not matter how good or bad the writing itself is - JK Rowling has hit on something that is so truthful once the fanciful world it is set in has been stripped away, that I think a large part of the literate populace are simply responding naturally to it.

Fantasy and Sci-Fi are 2 genres that are often underestimated or written-off as merely genre fiction and so don't have any merit or can hardly be vessels for truth, but this is not so - sometimes images and settings and cultures that are foreign or alien to us are the perfect vessel in which to express the things that are actually quite innate to us, for by utilizing a language of images and ideas that are not a part of the real world (and note that I admit this freely - there is NO such thing as magic as it is depicted in the HP books, nor any other kind, and I have faith in people that most of them - children and adults alike - who read the books would agree), we give ourselves permission to confront those things which we fear and/or strive for in our very selves, and gain access to what we would otherwise be cut-off from.

I am currently taking a class on Sci Fi literature so forgive all the heady academic language there, but I stick by what I've said. The above naturally goes for The Lord of the Rings and the other books of Middle-Earth, and come to think of it I have probably plagiarized some of what JRR Tolkien has said on the very same topic, so forgive me that. Smiley

In the specific case of the HP books, I think what Rowling's literary style lacks in sophistication she makes up for in accessibility - she is *incredibly* easy to read, reading HP is like drinking water, goes down so easily - and I think this colloquial, familiar style of writing is what makes her books so widely read by people of all ages.

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« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2005, 08:19:30 AM »

brief side note:

You're right about Science Fiction being discounted, Donna.  I've been reading it for over 40 years.  But there is still an aura from literature mavens that SF is "Greasy Kid Stuff" it's all rockets and blasters read by teen-age boys with few friends and not much social ability.  There is a quote from Margaret Atwood that what she wrote ("Handmaid's Tale" "Oryx and Crake") wasn't Science Fiction because SF is "Talking squids from Space'>  Roll Eyes  The monthly 'zine "Ansible" usually has a quote or two in the "As others see us" section.  Some of them are funny and some are sheerly clueless.  In the latest issue Atwood admits that she wrote SF
http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/Ansible/a216.html

Some SF *is* "Space Opera" and it can be enjoyable.  Other SF stories take an idea or technology or trend and postulate what it might come to in the future.  In the news one may find articles abou "Genetic Engineering" and wondering if it's good or bad. There have been stories about the use, misuse, good/evil of "Gengineering" for a couple of decades.

Or medical ethics.  One of the "Hugo" winning authors Lois McMaster Bujold has written a series of books about Miles Vorkosigen, who was exposed to a poison in utero and has very easily broken bones because of it.  His mother is urged to abort but does not. (The planet has a history of serious mutation problems, and in earlier years those who had them were not permitted to live) Miles is the son of a high noble man who fights to follow the traditions of joining the military.  One of the stories has a part taken from the "40 Martyrs of Sebaste". 

More later.

Ebor
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« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2005, 08:13:35 PM »

Well, I finished it.  I stayed up way too late until "Oh-dark-thirty" to get through the last 3 chapters.  Once you get to the ante-penultimate one, you've not going to stop until the end.  I' still processing it.  what a ride

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« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2005, 09:34:28 PM »

Donna Rose,

Ahh, well that makes sense. Maybe I will have to give the series a try with the first book, the next time I get down to the Library.
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« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2005, 11:57:36 PM »

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Well, I finished it.  I stayed up way too late until "Oh-dark-thirty" to get through the last 3 chapters.  Once you get to the ante-penultimate one, you've not going to stop until the end.  I' still processing it.  what a ride

Ebor

ah, been there... Smiley when you've collected your thoughts and figure out a way to express them without spoiling, do tell.

Quote
Donna Rose,

Ahh, well that makes sense. Maybe I will have to give the series a try with the first book, the next time I get down to the Library.

Thank you for taking what I wrote seriously Smiley granted, every person responds differently to all the different kinds of images and literary languages - fantasy literature doesn't appeal to everyone, it isn't the "key in" so to speak for everyone, just like I prefer it to sci fi (although sci fi is growing on me because of this class I am in), and yet say, historical fiction does nothing for me (unless it's based in myth Smiley ) - but as I said, in the case of the HP books they also have going for them an incredible accessibility and flow that, once you're caught up in it, it's hard to drag yourself away (as Ebor attests to above)....oh and one other draw of the HP books, but for me it is not nearly as important as what I wrote above, is that JK Rowling is a master at laying down very subtle clues and then blowing your mind with the solution to the puzzle, so to speak - in a lot of ways it's a 7-book long mystery series set in the wizarding world Smiley for people who like to mine for clues and piece things together and then see if they are right, these books are very appealing.
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« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2005, 09:48:35 AM »

Personally I think part of the draw also is that, while HP and his friends are battling evil, they are still dealing with personal issues, including staying decent people.  It's parallel to how most people live their lives. 

I finished the book on Friday night, and though the end saddened me quite a bit (trying not to put in spoilers), I see why it was absolutely needed for this to happen.  It means that in the next book, HP has to stand alone, as a fully mature (notice that he will be "of age" next book) adult, and have to deal without help from anyone but his two oldest friends. 
I was really ticked at the end of book 5 when Sirius died at the end (him being my fav character), but this ending I can deal with. 
J.K. Rawlings better have the last book ready by next summer.  :-) 

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« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2005, 12:39:00 PM »

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I finished the book on Friday night, and though the end saddened me quite a bit (trying not to put in spoilers), I see why it was absolutely needed for this to happen.  It means that in the next book, HP has to stand alone, as a fully mature (notice that he will be "of age" next book) adult, and have to deal without help from anyone but his two oldest friends.

Yep, I totally agree re: why it had to happen for the series to be the best it can be, i.e. Harry stepping out from everyone's shadow and showing the wizarding world what he's made of, but one of JKR's most important themes has been that a person does not thrive well working alone and without people who care about the person - Voldemort is a case in point. Because of this, I think Harry is definitely going to have to rely on the friendship and love he has accumulated over all these years - especially because, face it, if DD could barely get rid of ONE horcrux, and his hand was blackened and dead as a result, how on earth is Harry gonna find and get rid of another 4??? and in one book, no less?

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J.K. Rawlings better have the last book ready by next summer.  :-)

Alas, the word on the street is 2-3 years (hoping it's more like 2) Smiley

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« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2005, 01:39:06 PM »

I think that while Rowling's style is very accessable, there is also a good bit of sophistication, not to say erudition (as well as a good ear) in things like people's names and the folk legends behind some of the "magical creatures".

An example is "Dolores Umbridge" it sounds like it could be the name of an unpleasent person.  Then you look at the words "Dolores"--> dolorous --> "causing, marked by, or expressing misery or grief" and "Umbridge" -->umbrage --> meanings include "shade", "vague suggestion" and "a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult"  Well, that seems to describe the loathesome woman quite well.
 
Professor Remus Lupin--- Remus brother of Romulus, from the legend of the founding of Rome who were nursed by a wolf and Lupin/Lupus "wolf"
Malfoy--"Bad faith" in French
Mundungus-- slang for cheap smelly tobacco
Many of the names in the Black family tree are those of stars or constellations: Bellatrix, Sirius, Regulus, Andromeda.
Rubeus Hagrid -- Rubeus from having a ruddy/redish complexion perhaps from drinking and Hagrid, Rowling says, is an old English word meaning having had a bad night (again perhaps from too much firewhiskey or other potables down at Madame Rosmerta's.

There are lots more of these little tidbits that are fun to figure out or discover.

Ebor



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« Reply #31 on: July 25, 2005, 05:06:24 PM »

When I said a lack of sophistication, I meant in terms of prose narrative...her creativity is astounding, which is how I would view her ability to create the world in which her story takes place, including names, mythology, etc. I guess what I mean is, a passage from the Harry Potter books will probably not ever turn up in an AP English class for close reading...she is very good at layering clues and ideas, but it is sprawled over 7 books - a single, short passage from the books will not yield a multi-layered interpretation (unless you're talking about theories, of course, but that's a completely different realm of thinking)...It is pop literature - this doesn't mean BAD literature, but it is written to be accessible, which again I consider a GOOD THING regarding these books - I am so tired of reading dense prose like Heart of Darkness or Scarlet Letter. (Sorry, that's college speaking) Smiley
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« Reply #32 on: July 25, 2005, 06:17:29 PM »

You're quite right that JKR's prose flows well and carries the reader along.  It's not "easy" like an "easy reader book" or one with a limited vocabulary.  Thank you for the clarification contrasting it with dense things like "Heart of Darkness" or Heaven help us some of the "modern novels" in which plot and characters seem to be of little concern.

It is this flow and smoothness of reading along that makes the HP books so accessable to children and that in many cases provides a way for them to get in the habit of reading so that they continue on to other works.

I just found out that "Scrimgeour" is from a word meaning "skirmisher"... interesting choice.

Ebor
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« Reply #33 on: July 25, 2005, 08:30:58 PM »

What is fun about JKR's writing style is that the syntax of many of her sentences is very much the way I think things, and so it is also the way I speak things...perhaps this is why I find her so easy to read - the thoughts are right in tune w/ how I would think them myself. It is a very contemporary way of writing, if that makes any sense, and when I say "contemporary" I don't mean it in a pejorative sense - I mean she is writing in the style that the people of today can read and understand best, and yet she doesn't shy away from complex sentence structure (some people have called them "run-on" sentences, but actually they are all grammatically correct and not run-on, and this complex sentence structures happen to be how I tend to write as well, for better or worse).

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I just found out that "Scrimgeour" is from a word meaning "skirmisher"... interesting choice.

Yes interesting, and makes sense, since he is a former-Auror who probably worked on the front lines against Voldemort and his followers before taking the political role of Minister of Magic...although I must say, some of his ideas and attitudes in HBP disappointed me, i.e. caring more about how things LOOK (even if the ultimate goal is to boost morale) than about how things *are*. Glad Harry is "Dumbledore's man, through and through." Grin I hope the Ministry wizens up in time to assist Harry in the final battle - I doubt it though.
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« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2005, 10:16:51 AM »

Well, I've "processed" the book, at least partially.  How shall the discussion go? No spoilers?  Spoiler warnings with blank areas before them? 

It was interesting to see more "layers" put on some of the characters that made them more human or rounded as it were.

Ebor
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« Reply #35 on: July 27, 2005, 10:29:50 AM »

It'll be interesting to see how this discussion progresses.  I finished the book on Saturday and was numb...I never expected it to go that way.  Was surprised to find out who is the half blood prince.  Never would have guessed that.  I hope Hagrid gets the "open position" at Hogworts.  The wait for the next book will seem longer than it actually will be. 
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« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2005, 10:41:24 AM »

I'll have to reread some of the earlier books, but it is in my mind that Rowling set out many little details in them that are suddenly "Oh right!"  The threads are coming together more.  But it looks to be about 2 years for the final volume. 

There were a number of surprises that characters broke what might seem to be 'pattern's or sterotypes, not sure if those are quite the right words.

Fred and George are as ummm chaotic-good as ever, though

Ebor
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« Reply #37 on: July 27, 2005, 11:07:45 AM »

The first chapter was a treat to read.  I kept seeing Tony Blair as the Muggle Prime Minister.  And he thought he has problems with Iraq...
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« Reply #38 on: July 27, 2005, 12:43:16 PM »

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The first chapter was a treat to read.  I kept seeing Tony Blair as the Muggle Prime Minister.  And he thought he has problems with Iraq...

LOL yea it is a wonderful chapter, and apparently JKR has wanted to start one of her books w/ this chapter for a while now, linking the wizarding and muggle worlds - I think she did a good job of it. It was perfect timing IMO because it allowed us to meet the new Minister of Magic without his introduction being cheesy or expositional.

OK I am so picky about spoilers, i.e. I would never forgive myself for spoiling the books for someone who hasn't read them yet but might read them in the future, even if they don't have plans to...so...how about we start a new thread w/ spoilers and announce it in the subject heading, that way the people who have read it can discuss away - there are SO MANY details in this book that deserve discussing, and it seems there's a (small) group of us here ready and willing to discuss... Smiley I hafta leave for class in a few, but if there's no new thread started when I come home later, I'll start it. Smiley
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« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2005, 11:43:56 AM »

I quite enjoyed the first chapter with the Prime Minister.  The recollection of his first meeting with Fudge and his "teacup" nibbling on the corner of his report was a lovely bit.  I was wondering how Margaret Thatcher would have reacted to meeting the Minister of Magic. Wink 

Ebor
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« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2005, 12:29:34 PM »

I was wondering how Margaret Thatcher would have reacted to meeting the Minister of Magic. WinkÂÂ  Ebor

Come to think of it...how would the American counterpart (President Regan) have handled such a meeting?
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« Reply #41 on: August 25, 2005, 10:22:24 AM »

I've pondered your question, MonkVasyl, and I am unable to come to a good conclusion on that one.  Wink

Sorry, this is so long in coming.  Life has it's Ways of getting one's attention.

Ebor
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« Reply #42 on: August 29, 2005, 05:13:08 PM »

I'm reading it for the 4th or 5th time, i lost count.  I dont find it as entertaining/absorbing as 1-5, but then we have to set up for the final book.  I was very disappointed in who did what, and i have a feeling as to who RAB is, so it will be interesting to see how that plays out in the final chapter.

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« Reply #43 on: August 29, 2005, 07:05:57 PM »

aurelia,

if you want to discuss the book full out w/ people's names (i.e. the who above) there's another thread called "HP thread WITH SPOILERS" or something to that effect. i, too, was shocked at the "who," but I go into detail about it in the other thread. Smiley

D
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« Reply #44 on: August 30, 2005, 07:30:46 AM »

Thanks, missed that one!
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