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djrak
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« on: July 06, 2005, 01:06:41 PM »

so are there any converts here from other religions, or just other denominations of Christianity (ie: Protestants, Catholics, etc...)
just curious...
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« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2005, 01:11:41 PM »

From another religion; I was Episcopalian.
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« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2005, 01:17:54 PM »

From another religion; I was Episcopalian.
but that's a christian church isnt it?
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« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2005, 01:35:43 PM »

but that's a christian church isnt it?

That's his way of being facetious - that the Episcopalians have departed so far from Orthodoxy.
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« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2005, 01:46:17 PM »

That's his way of being facetious - that the Episcopalians have departed so far from Orthodoxy.
hmm...i feel you Wink
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2005, 03:39:18 PM »

so are there any converts here from other religions, or just other denominations of Christianity (ie: Protestants, Catholics, etc...)
just curious...



I dabbled in witchcraft and assorted other occult practices. (Tarot cards, crystals, aura's, runes, herbs, runes, horoscopes) as a teen and younger adult. Somewhere around the age of 25 I cast a spell in hopes of finding love. 1 month to the day, I met my husband who was Byzantine Catholic. The short story is I was baptized Byzantine Catholic 2 years later my husband and I  were chrismated into the Orthodox church.   I believe meeting my husband was God's gentle reminder that I was heading down the wrong path.
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djrak
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2005, 03:23:10 AM »

I dabbled in witchcraft and assorted other occult practices. (Tarot cards, crystals, aura's, runes, herbs, runes, horoscopes) as a teen and younger adult.
i see your point
Quote
Somewhere around the age of 25 I cast a spell in hopes of finding love. 1 month to the day, I met my husband who was Byzantine Catholic. The short story is I was baptized Byzantine Catholic 2 years later my husband and I  were chrismated into the Orthodox church.  ÃƒÆ’‚ I believe meeting my husband was God's gentle reminder that I was heading down the wrong path.
thanks for sharing that, "a gentle remider" that describes it perfectly.
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2005, 11:28:14 AM »

so are there any converts here from other religions, or just other denominations of Christianity (ie: Protestants, Catholics, etc...)
just curious...

I was involved in various Protestant denominations before going Coptic.    I have a friend who was raised athiest, who no longer is on this board.   He converted from athiesm to Syriac Orthodox church of Antioch.
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« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2005, 02:11:40 PM »

Addai, you know what i've noticed? in the protestrant churches (especialy pentecostal) there were converts from Islam, i havent seen any in orthodox churches... maybe it's just my luck Huh
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« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2005, 02:58:41 PM »

i come from a Roman Catholic background.

Quote
you know what i've noticed? in the protestrant churches (especialy pentecostal) there were converts from Islam, i havent seen any in orthodox churches... maybe it's just my luck

a woman was baptised in my parish a few weeks ago...when i asked who she was and if she'd be joining our parish, our deacon told me she is from :::insert country here, unfortunately i cannot remember::: which is a Muslim country...she was not quite a practicing Muslim (just grew up in the country and in the culture of Islam), but this was the closest to a Muslim that my parish had ever baptised...i replied: well, Glory to God! Wink so, that's a hopeful sign maybe...

In Christ,
Donna Mary
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hmmmm...
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« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2005, 03:09:09 PM »

i replied: well, Glory to God! Wink so, that's a hopeful sign maybe...
Amen!
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« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2005, 04:27:11 PM »

Addai, you know what i've noticed? in the protestrant churches (especialy pentecostal) there were converts from Islam, i havent seen any in orthodox churches... maybe it's just my luck Huh

Well thats interesting.   I imagine that has to do with socialization towards evangelism.   Being more pro doing it to the point of it possibily even be considered prolytezing.   And so many Orthodox, after living with Sharia law are conditioned to avoid Muslims.


In the states unhappy Protestants seem drawn to Orthodoxy.   Especially folks from Charismatic/Pentecostal backgrounds, who want some order and historical roots etc.    In my parish however most Copt converts are Roman Catholics who converted after marrying an Egptian (man usually but once in a while its RC man marrying a Coptic lady).
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« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2005, 01:53:31 AM »

And so many Orthodox, after living with Sharia law are conditioned to avoid Muslims.
what does this mean  Huh
Orthdox are under the law Huh
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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2005, 08:44:26 PM »

Addai, you know what i've noticed? in the protestrant churches (especialy pentecostal) there were converts from Islam, i havent seen any in orthodox churches... maybe it's just my luck Huh

I know a British Orthodox monk who is a hegomen (protopriest) who converted from Islam when he was 12 after reading books against Christianity.  He's an Indian currently serving as a missionary in India.

In my church (Coptic Orthodox) there are I think 4 converts from Islam, and we're a small church.  In the church in the next city there's at least one.  There are much bigger churches in nearby cities, so I'm sure there are some there.

I was a baptist and pentecostal, and nearly joined the catholic church before finally joning the Coptic Orthodox Church a few years ago.
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« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2005, 09:31:31 AM »

I'm a teenager that has finally been allowed by my parents to become an Eastern Orthodox catechumen. They intend on me being a catechumen for the next two years. As a younger child, we went to different Protestant sects but ended up in the Christian and Missionary Alliance sect [anyone ever heard of this one?]. Next school year, instead of going to my public highschool, I get to attend the North Carolina School of Science and Math in Durham [about 1.5 hours from me]. I hope this distance from my parents will help me grow more in the faith.
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« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2005, 12:22:02 PM »

I'm a teenager that has finally been allowed by my parents to become an Eastern Orthodox catechumen. They intend on me being a catechumen for the next two years. As a younger child, we went to different Protestant sects but ended up in the Christian and Missionary Alliance sect [anyone ever heard of this one?]. Next school year, instead of going to my public highschool, I get to attend the North Carolina School of Science and Math in Durham [about 1.5 hours from me]. I hope this distance from my parents will help me grow more in the faith.

I think I have relatives on my Dad's side who are CMAers.  Don't know quite what they believe.
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« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2005, 09:43:47 PM »

what does this meanÂÂ  Huh
Orthdox are under the law Huh

lol

no Orthodox are conditioned to not evangelize or prosyletize muslims because they don't want their throat cut. (sharia law punishes people who try to convert muslims with death).
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« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2005, 12:05:02 AM »

I am fleeing the Baptist Church.  I can't leave it fast enough.  To make a long story short, my journey into Orthodoxy is going to be a long one which must be treated with great care, love and mercy.
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« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2005, 09:42:16 AM »

I am fleeing the Baptist Church.  I can't leave it fast enough.

Mmm.  Been there, bro.  Welcome to the wilderness wanderings.

Quote
To make a long story short, my journey into Orthodoxy is going to be a long one which must be treated with great care, love and mercy.

Prayers for you.
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« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2005, 10:01:58 AM »

I am fleeing the Baptist Church.ÂÂ  I can't leave it fast enough.ÂÂ  To make a long story short, my journey into Orthodoxy is going to be a long one which must be treated with great care, love and mercy.

Wow...seems like you and I have a lot in common...on both counts.  (I'm a Southern Baptist in name only at this point, but family considerations are delaying me in seeking to become a catechumen.  Feel free to send me a PM, if you want.)
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« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2005, 10:14:56 AM »

Sevent Day Adventism, the heresy of heresies and the a death trap of death traps. Lord have mercy.
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« Reply #21 on: July 19, 2005, 09:06:01 AM »

Sevent Day Adventism, the heresy of heresies and the a death trap of death traps. Lord have mercy.
hey sin_vladimirov,
i think sda's get baptised more than once why is that?
were you born into a sda family or converted?
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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2005, 09:49:31 AM »

hey sin_vladimirov,
i think sda's get baptised more than once why is that?
were you born into a sda family or converted?

Not to my knowledge, that is they get baptised once in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit by single immersion.
I was brought up in a communist/atheist family, and SDA was my first religious expirience.
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« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2005, 11:18:34 AM »

once ia discussion forum this sda guy he said something about getting baptized again cos his attendance at  church was not consistant.
i felt so bad for him
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« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2005, 11:28:32 AM »

I am not really sure, he might have fallen away (why the hell would you return) but I am not sure if that would warrant re-baptism. I could probably find the doctrine about it if you want.

SDA just like most of protestants do not regard baptism as a mystery. SDA are fairly delicate when it comes to doing things "the right way" (does not prevent them from being so painfully cult-like).

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« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2005, 12:47:41 PM »

After ten years in a Calvinist Church decided I really was never going to be a Calvinist.  I almost discovered Orthodoxy by accident (well, maybe it wasn't by accident after all).

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« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2005, 01:08:28 PM »

IC XC NIKA
Born into a Protestant family, converted to Catholicism at age 15, was Baptized and Chrismed on my 18th birthday into the COC.
in Christ,
shawn
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« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2005, 01:37:22 PM »

IC XC NIKA
Born into a Protestant family, converted to Catholicism at age 15, was Baptized and Chrismed on my 18th birthday into the COC.
in Christ,
shawn
W :oW
you had all those conversions at a very young age... how come?
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« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2005, 01:46:40 PM »

Was and am nominally Southern Baptist (My name is in their membership logs), but I am converting from Functional Agnositicism/Secular Humanism to the Coptic Orthodox Church.  I went to church with my grandparents, but I was raised by my parents not to believe anything I was told and that we would never know what was out there until we died.  I became an atheist at 18, thinking God was a rediculous concept.  At 19, having a miserable time, God became real to me and I realized that He loved me and wanted more for me than what I was giving myself.  I then began to seek the Orthodox Church that I had read about in High School.  I came across the Coptic Church and the OCA.  I visited both for a while and have prayerfully decided on the COC.

Adrian
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« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2005, 03:17:50 PM »

IC XC NIKA
djrak,
The Lord give you His peace.
Just as a disclaimer, you might want to grab a pillow, since you might fall asleep from reading this.
6th of December, 1985 I popped out of my mother in Norfolk Va.ÂÂ  I was born to a fellow by the name of Russell and a lasie by the name of Ann.ÂÂ  Soon after, I was baptized into my family's Methodist church.
Being a military brat (my father was in the navy for 20 years, retired a commander; both grandfathers were in the military as well, one in WW2 and the other in Vietnam) I saw much of the country of the United States, moving from one side to the other.ÂÂ  
Eventually, at the age of 6 we moved back to our house in Norfolk Va.ÂÂ  I tell you no lie, djrak, but if the Good Lord allowed me to live any time of my life over again, it would be from my age 6 to 8.ÂÂ  I mean, life was so innocent being a kid.ÂÂ  Waking up, playing with my Ninja Turtles and GI Joe action figures, or playing the sega genesis (with such classic games such as Mortal Kombat, Boogerman, NBA Jam, and Sonic), or canoeing in a creek and trying to catch baby turtles.
Anyways, some neighbors moved into our house next door (our house was 1304 Sage Ct.) who happened to be of Aftrican decent.ÂÂ  The father of this family turned out to be a Baptist pastor, and he had a son by the name of Jeremiah.ÂÂ  We became close friends.ÂÂ  He being the son of a pastor, first "introduced" me to religion.ÂÂ  I mean, my family and I went to church almost every Sunday; but I just saw church as this borning place, where I had to were a hot stupid suit and tuck my shirt in.
At the age of 10, my father was relocated to Jacksonville Fl., so we back our bags and kissed good-bye to Va.ÂÂ  Down "south" I got involved in skateboarding; so God was the last thing on my mind.
Age 12, my father was relocated to a place called Clifton Va. 15 minutes outside of Washington D.C.ÂÂ  So, once more, we moved back north (which didn't bother me; I'm a fan of cooler weather personally).ÂÂ  I was so excited, since D.C. is a city, and well cities are awesome places to skateboard (as well as getting your skateboard confiscated).ÂÂ  We were still going to church almost every Sunday, but I really didn't give, in the words of Frank McCourt, a fiddler's fart about it.ÂÂ  
7th grade, I took a class called IFL (Intro to Foreign Language).ÂÂ  Personally, I love languages and I love history (and at the time, espically European).ÂÂ  We finally came to the French part of the class (boo hisss, I know I know) and we watched a film on St. Michel's in France
http://www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/majorsites/aa/st_michaels.html
I found the life of the Benedictine monks extremly fascinating.ÂÂ  The chants, the incense, etc.ÂÂ  So after school, I rushed home and flipped on the tele.ÂÂ  I knew there were 2 Christian stations of the tele, so I decided to check them out.ÂÂ  One station was called "TBN" and it is a Pentecostal station, well... Protestant for the most part.ÂÂ  The other was EWTN, the Catholic station.ÂÂ  I watched both these channels religiously, and started reading the bible.ÂÂ  I'm sad to admit, but each morning at 9 a.m. I made sure not to miss John Hagee and his fire and brimestone, pro American and Israeli anti-anything-not-american-or-israeli television show.ÂÂ  However, there was also a show by a priest by the name of Fr. Andrew Apostili CFR on a man by the name of Fr. Pio (aka. St. Padre Pio for Catholics now).ÂÂ  
http://www.franciscanfriars.com/BTC/BTC%20Andrew.htm
Anyways, 8th grade, a buddy of mine and I went on a bike ride (mountain biking to be exact).ÂÂ  It was a hot and humid summer day, and we were in desperate need of water.ÂÂ  We eventually passed by a Catholic church by the name of St. Andrew's, hoping to receive some water to relieve the heat.
http://www.st-andrew.org/
This site is old, but I can't find a newer one.ÂÂ  Anyways, the man in the top right is Fr. Fasano (not the pope lol) who is actually a well respected and well known Catholic priest; he eventually became my spiritual director.ÂÂ  I eventually made it back there by myself, and had enough guts to ask a priest some questions (since, I being a Protestant, I thought he would call the cops or something lol).ÂÂ  We talked for a bit, and eventually he gave me a few books: The Catechism, a book called Jesus our Eucharistic Love (writen by a Franciscan by the name of Fr. Stefano Manelli) as well as a few other little pamplets.ÂÂ  I devoured these books.ÂÂ  I started watching EWTN more and more, and grew a deep love for Francis of Assisi, as well as the already mentioned Padre Pio.ÂÂ  
I told my parents, when I was age 14, that I wanted to become Catholic.ÂÂ  They were disappointed to say the least, but they allowed me to beome Catholic.ÂÂ  The Easter Vigil, 2000 I was Chrismed after taking my ROTC (I think that is what they were called) classes.ÂÂ  As I grew in Catholicism, reading much of the lives of the saints, praying the rosary many times a day, etc. I decided that I might be "called" to the religious life.ÂÂ  As you could guess, I wanted something Franciscan.ÂÂ  I eventually came up with three Franciscan Orders I was considering:
http://www.marymediatrix.com/rel_life/friars.shtml
www.franciscanfriars.com
and a thrid group, the one I had my eyes on the most, a group called the Franciscan Friars of the Primitive Observance (who broke off from the friars at www.franciscanfriars.com)
I also, as I was going deeper and deeper into Catholicism, spending at least an hour a day at church (in Eucharistic Adoration) wanted a deeper prayer life.ÂÂ  And where does a Catholic turn to to have a deeper prayer life?ÂÂ  The Carmelites of course.ÂÂ  I read the complete works of John of the Cross, as well as Teresa of Avilia; also the autobiography of Therese of Liseuxe.ÂÂ  However, as I delved deeper and deeper I became more and more disgusted with the papacy; or I should say, the Roman interpretation of the papacy.ÂÂ  I also had it with the Western rite, and was strongly considering a Eastern Rite church (particually the Maronites, after PJP2's trip to Ukraine).ÂÂ  So, after finishing my works on the Carmelites, I started to go onto the internet and study the works of the Early Fathers; both from the Catholic and Orthodox POV.ÂÂ  
Eventually, I had enough with Catholicism, after the North American bishops didn't allow (or, it was out of the norm) to receive Eucharist kneeling.ÂÂ  So, I "packed my bags" and started attending St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Church, around the holiday of St. Patricks, 2003
www.stmarkdc.org
I quickly became friends with Abouna Anthony Messeh.ÂÂ  He helped guide me through the basic teachings and the understanding of the Fathers and Scripture of Orthodoxy.ÂÂ  I was hooked.ÂÂ  On the 6th of December 2003, (which was a snowy Saturday, which happened to be the same day the Army Navy football game was on; however, I don't know if I should call it a game since Navy slaughtered Army) I was Baptized (as I like to put it, "fully") and Chrismed into the Orthodox Church.
However, 2004, the Summer of that year, I fell into Zen Buddhism.ÂÂ  I blame this fall on many things, which I wish not to state hear.ÂÂ  However, through the grace of our good Lord Jesus, he led me to a wonderful "true theolgian" by the name of Grigorii Wassen.ÂÂ  Now, this Grigorii, unlike most knowledgable laity who know a thing or two about Orthodoxy, taught it with love and compassion (unlike many jerks I've come across on the internet).ÂÂ  Grigorii, in my opinion, is a living saint; but, I should keep my opinion to myself.
anyways, sorry for the long post.
in Christ,
shawn
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« Reply #30 on: July 26, 2005, 04:12:07 PM »

so are there any converts here from other religions, or just other denominations of Christianity (ie: Protestants, Catholics, etc...)
just curious...

In spite of the fact that I was raised in a very baptist home, it cannot be said that I converted from the Baptist church to the Orthodox Church. I departed Christianity altogether when I was about sixteen, studied and nominally practiced Buddhism for years, and then fell into an aspiritual life. I assumed a fundamentally existentialist outlook on life, but never fell fully into the atheist trap. So, in essence, I converted to Orthodoxy from agnosticism.
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« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2005, 01:39:34 AM »

Shawn, that's a crazy story, i never could've imagined someone that young being so deeply zealous about religion. May God keep you firm in your faith and bless you with many gifts to glorify Him.
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« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2005, 06:10:10 AM »

I'm a reader, not a responder (in fact, this is my first post), but I am happy to see that there is someone else who became Orthodox when he was young. 

I was raised in a small Texas town (population 2000, graduated with 24 other kids) that was near a small city, Lubbock, with a mission GOA parish.  I got fed up with being Southern Baptist (my father was even a deacon) when I was fourteen, experimented with Wicca when I was 15 (movies, ya know?), then in the fall of 1997, when I was 16, I drove off to the GOA parish and never looked back.  I was chrismated in March 1998, two months before I graduated high school. 

I left the for a couple years around the end of college and after, as all too many college students do, but now I'm back in the fold, though God's grace.  Now I look back on my time outside of the Church with dismay, but, with the help of hindsight, much prayer, the Eucharist, more prayer, Confession, and a couple good priests, I have been able to draw many lessons from that experience.  I feel a lot like St. Mary (except that I'm much worse and far weaker than she)--I'm also convinced that through her prayers I came back to the Church. 

Here's the interesting thing about converting when you're young.  While I'm a convert, I have been Orthodox for nearly a decade, for all of my "adult" life.  In many ways I don't know anything other than being Orthodox, so it's like being a non-cradle cradle Orthodox, if that makes sense.
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« Reply #33 on: July 27, 2005, 07:01:00 AM »

welcome Anthony!
Someone should reall think about compiling a book of personal convert stories and publish it. It would be so encouraging to people thinking of converting and MUCH more to cradle orthodox who dont realise how precious their faith is.

please feel free to post more stories even if they're not yours or e-mail them to me. i think i'm going to do it myself.  Grin
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Birgitta
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« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2005, 12:26:00 PM »

so are there any converts here from other religions, or just other denominations of Christianity (ie: Protestants, Catholics, etc...)
just curious...
I was one of Jehowah´s Witnesses over 20 years (because my parent´s wanted me to be member of that community). I left the group and then I converted to Lutheranism and after that to Orthodoxy... I was Chrismed five months ago.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2005, 12:29:29 PM by Birgitta » Logged
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« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2005, 12:48:59 PM »

I was one of Jehowah´s Witnesses over 20 years (because my parent´s wanted me to be member of that community). I left the group and then I converted to Lutheranism and after that to Orthodoxy... I was Chrismed five months ago.
welcome Birgitta
I think Lutherans are the closest among protestants to the spirituality of Orthodoxy (although pretty far). I heard they even have statues of Jesus in some of their churches in Norway.
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« Reply #36 on: August 24, 2005, 03:24:45 PM »

Roman Catholicism seems to be the closest among protestants to the Orthodox.   Grin
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« Reply #37 on: August 25, 2005, 12:48:56 AM »

I was raised in the Roman Catholic Church and at the age of 16 or 17 I went to the SSPX Church and was 'conditionally confirmed' because I thought that the rc church did not perform the sacraments 'right' when they confirmed me in the novus ordite roman catholic church.  In Nov. 2000 I was made a Catechuman in the Antiochian Orthodox Church and in April 2001 I was received by Chrismation and Confession into the Orthodox Church(was Chrismated in the OCA because I had moved to another area before I could be Chrismated at the Antiochian Church) I am still an Orthodox Christian and was married to an Orthodox convert as well in the Antiochian Church about a year after I was Chrismated (I think...?)

In Christ,
the sinner, Mary

And if anyone out there could learn anything from this, it would have to be don't give up or think you know all there is to know about Orthodoxy and what the Church teaches, because I was a very zealous and unfortunatly judgemental(still am judgemental) convert to the Orthodox church and I converted for the wrong reasons but I am not sorry that I did become Orthodox though.
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« Reply #38 on: August 25, 2005, 10:13:10 AM »

I converted from pretty much everything else! I was raised Roman Catholic. I then became an atheist for a while. When I was 19 I joined a Hindu cult for 8 years. After I escaped from that I practised Theravada Buddhism for about 3 or so years then I converted to Orthodoxy about a year ago. It's been one crazy ride for sure, but I'm happy to be home finally.
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« Reply #39 on: September 14, 2005, 02:27:55 PM »

I'm in the process of converting from Lutheran.  Born Lutheran and raised Lutheran.  Finally started questioning Church policy and theology and ended up searching for about 4 years.  Tried just about everything.

Stepped into a Orthodox Church about 3 months ago and knew I was finally knew I was home.
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« Reply #40 on: September 16, 2005, 01:10:32 AM »

I was raised Roman Catholic.  I drifted away while in college, for all the college reasons (sex and intellectual pride) plus a lack of mystical depth.  I dabbled in Judaism. 

I came back to the Catholic Church.  I left again the Catholic Church:  again because it has a lack of spiritual depth.  I craved (without being to articulate it) an intense life of spiritual immersion into God, and that wasn't happening in the protestantized RC Mass and an attitude which tries to put God into a legalistic, intellectual box and social work. 

Without being able to articulate it then, I sensed that Catholicism is cataphatic but I am apophatic and I craved an apophatic form of religion.  So, I left the Church in 1997 or so.  I tried Episcopalianism as "the thinking man's religion."  Nope.  So, I next turned to Wicca because it recognizes the spiritual side of life.  But, Wicca has no substance beyond recognizing that the psychic side of life exists; and it is witchcraft, and that is not good.  I was still too intellectually proud to turn back to the Gospel. 

So, I ended up doing the world tour of religions.  I learned a lot from Hinduism, but it's basically an ethnic religion that you have to be born into.  The same is true with Confucianism/Taoism.   So, I turned to Buddhism.  But it's too abstract and, besides, I like believing that I and my loved actually exist!  Etc.  I even read the Koran. 

Finally, I was nothing.  And I didn't like being nothing.  I realized that if I was going to be intellectually honest, I would have to take another look at the Gospel.  I did.  I read C.S. Lewis' "Mere Christianity," and the Gospel finally made sense to me.  "Jesus Christ was either a liar, a lunatic, or exactly what He said He was." 

I came back to Jesus Christ and the Catholic Church in March, 2003.  (Why the Catholic Church, if I had been so dissatisfied with it before?  Two reasons:  the Eucharist, and it was what I was raised with.)  But, I still didn't have a sense of spiritual depth or fulfillment or living in union with God. 

The priest who received me back into the Catholic Church is an Eastern Catholic, and he introduced me to Eastern Christianity.  It was like a revelation.  I finally found a form of Christianity that was alive  and suffused with spiritual presence of God.

I wanted more. 

I read:  The Way of a Pilgrim, The Orthodox Church, the Orthodox Way, The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church, The Mountain of Silence, The Illness and Cure of the Soul in the Orthodox Tradition. 

I prayed: the Jesus Prayer, stillness, fasting on Wednesdays and Fridays, attending Divine Liturgy, attending (quite recently) vespers at a monastery (which may turn out to be a life-changing event for me since I profoundly felt  “at home” in that environment). 

I learned:  I finally began to learn about the Holy Spirit and the life in Christ.  I finally found a language  --in art and liturgy and lifestyle, in heart and mind and soul and strength--  to receive and to express an entire life lived in union with God in Jesus Christ in the unity of the Holy Spirit, starting now and foretasting forever.  I finally found the Trinity and a way to participate in the Trinitarian life.  I finally found a truly Eucharistic way of life where every moment can be an epiclesis.  I finally found my life in Christ. 

I discovered that the "more" that I have been looking for is, perhaps, Orthodoxy. 

Now I'm discerning whether to convert to Orthodoxy or not.  I’m trying to discern if this really is where I'm meant to be, or if this is some kind of infatuation.  Say a prayer for me, please, for clarity and wisdom.  I'm really tired of being a spiritual and religious nomad. 
« Last Edit: September 16, 2005, 06:41:25 AM by arjuna3110 » Logged
Arystarcus
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« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2005, 01:52:12 AM »

Quote
The priest who received me back into the Catholic Church is a uniate, and he introduced me to Eastern Christianity.

It's amazing how many people have been introduced to Eastern Christianity via the Byzaninte Catholic Church, and then how many of those who were introduced ended up being led to Orthodoxy.

May God bless you as you seek His will in this time of discerment. Smiley

In Christ,
Aaron

PS- If I remember correctly, quite a while ago the forum mods advised against the use of the term "uniate", instead favoring Byzantine Catholic, Eastern Catholic, etc. Just thought I'd let you know as most of the long time posters are already aware of this.ÂÂ  Smiley
« Last Edit: September 16, 2005, 01:54:44 AM by Arystarcus » Logged
arjuna3110
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« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2005, 06:44:24 AM »

"It's amazing how many people have been introduced to Eastern Christianity via the Byzaninte Catholic Church, and then how many of those who were introduced ended up being led to Orthodoxy."

Yes, I thank God for my priest that He sent me to !



"May God bless you as you seek His will in this time of discerment. Smiley   In Christ, Aaron"

Thank you truly, Aaron.



"PS- If I remember correctly, quite a while ago the forum mods advised against the use of the term "uniate", instead favoring Byzantine Catholic, Eastern Catholic, etc. Just thought I'd let you know as most of the long time posters are already aware of this.ÂÂ  Smiley "

Thank you for the correction !  I edited the text accordingly, and I added some changes too.
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« Reply #43 on: September 21, 2005, 03:40:25 PM »

20 years Southern Baptist, 10 Years Nothing, 18 Years Episcopalian......A long pilgrimage!
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« Reply #44 on: September 21, 2005, 05:13:51 PM »

Grew up protestant, then, to RC.  Now, to Orthodox for good!
But, I have to say this, I wish there wasn't a split because IMO God would want it to be one church.   Instead, we have to be one or the other.    I know the differences, but still  in my heart, it seems we should be one.

Irene
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« Reply #45 on: September 22, 2005, 11:47:36 AM »

 Wink Never to pass something like this by but what about recent immigrants from traditionally Orthodox countries who were unbaptized and unchurched before joining the church either in their homelands or in the states?  I seem to have detected an atmosphere were in a church of their ethnicity they were just accepted as one of the crowd speaking the language rather than recent converts which they are?  Same goes for Greek Catholics who are of the same ethnicity. Has anyone else noticed this phenomena?
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