Author Topic: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages  (Read 4558 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline orthodoxindonesia

  • T I M
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 154
  • Tuhan kasihanilah!
  • Faith: Kristen Ortodoks Timur
  • Jurisdiction: Metropolis of Singapore and South Asia
"LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« on: August 08, 2015, 12:28:23 PM »
What do you say "Kyrie eleison/Gospodi pomiluj" in your native language?
Let share from me. I say "Tuhan kasihanilah"  (Indonesian)  :)
ALLAH Maha Kudus, Sang Kuasa Maha Kudus, Sang Baka Maha Kudus, kasihanilah kami!
Αγιος ο Θεός, Αγιος Ισχυρός, Αγιος Αθάνατος, ελέησον ημάς

Offline Cyrillic

  • Laser Basileus.
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 13,707
  • St. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, pray for us!
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to Finland
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2015, 12:35:42 PM »
1. Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

2. Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

I prefer 1a.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2015, 12:38:50 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline orthodoxindonesia

  • T I M
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 154
  • Tuhan kasihanilah!
  • Faith: Kristen Ortodoks Timur
  • Jurisdiction: Metropolis of Singapore and South Asia
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2015, 12:39:20 PM »
Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

Is it Suomi? 
ALLAH Maha Kudus, Sang Kuasa Maha Kudus, Sang Baka Maha Kudus, kasihanilah kami!
Αγιος ο Θεός, Αγιος Ισχυρός, Αγιος Αθάνατος, ελέησον ημάς

Offline Cyrillic

  • Laser Basileus.
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 13,707
  • St. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, pray for us!
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to Finland
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2015, 12:44:29 PM »
Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

Is it Suomi?

No.

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,350
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: POC, but my heart belongs to Antioch
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2015, 12:59:19 PM »
1. Polish:
Panie zmiłuj się

2. Serbian:
Господе помилуј (Gospode pomiluj)
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Cavaradossi

  • 法網恢恢,疏而不漏
  • OC.net guru
  • *******
  • Posts: 1,941
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2015, 01:06:02 PM »
1. Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

2. Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

I prefer 1a.

You use the formal in Dutch?
Be comforted, and have faith, O Israel, for your God is infinitely simple and one, composed of no parts.

Offline Cyrillic

  • Laser Basileus.
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 13,707
  • St. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, pray for us!
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to Finland
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2015, 01:38:43 PM »
1. Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

2. Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

I prefer 1a.

You use the formal in Dutch?

It has a Statenvertaling-ring to it. I like that.

Besides, the archaic form is metrical (being iambic - Hēerĕ hēb gĕnādĕ) and thus has a better 'flow'. The modern version (Hēer hēb gĕnādĕ) isn't metrical.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2015, 01:57:33 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline Eastern Mind

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 721
  • Faith: Catholic
  • Jurisdiction: Antioch (Maronite)
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2015, 01:43:30 PM »
Arabic: : يا ربّ ارحم Yā Rabbu rḥam!

Irish:  A Thiarna, déan trócaire orainn!
My anime double posts here.

^^^ It's been so long since I've been here I literally have no idea what that is even referring to o_O

Offline Cavaradossi

  • 法網恢恢,疏而不漏
  • OC.net guru
  • *******
  • Posts: 1,941
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2015, 01:49:45 PM »
1. Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

2. Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

I prefer 1a.

You use the formal in Dutch?

It has a Statenvertaling-ring to it. I like that. Besides, it sounds more metrical and has a better 'flow'.

Grammar question: if you were using gij instead, would you still include the pronoun with the imperative?
Be comforted, and have faith, O Israel, for your God is infinitely simple and one, composed of no parts.

Offline Cyrillic

  • Laser Basileus.
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 13,707
  • St. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, pray for us!
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to Finland
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2015, 01:54:00 PM »
1. Heere, heb genade!/Here, heb genade!/Heer, heb genade!

2. Heere, ontferm u!/Here, ontferm u!/Heer, ontferm u!

From archaic to contemporary.

I prefer 1a.

You use the formal in Dutch?

It has a Statenvertaling-ring to it. I like that. Besides, it sounds more metrical and has a better 'flow'.

Grammar question: if you were using gij instead, would you still include the pronoun with the imperative?

I'd use the (now obsolete) subjunctive mood instead with gij. "Moge Gij genade met mij hebben, o Heer." 

Gij + the imperative mood doesn't sound very natural.

Read the updated post, btw. I elaborated a bit.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2015, 02:00:13 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline FinnJames

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 788
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church of Finland
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2015, 02:18:10 PM »
Finnish: Herra armahda

Offline Indocern

  • BANNED for rules violations
  • OC.net guru
  • *******
  • Posts: 1,351
  • Faith: Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Orthodox
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2015, 02:43:20 PM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2015, 02:47:27 PM by Indocern »

Offline hecma925

  • Non-clairvoyant, but you can call me Elder
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 14,188
  • Unbreakable! He's alive, dammit! It's a MIRACLE!
  • Faith: Truthful Chalcedonian Truther
  • Jurisdiction: Candle-lighting Cross Kisser
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2015, 06:14:57 PM »
Spanish:  Señor, ten piedad.
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

Once Christ has filled the Cross, it can never be empty again.

"But God doesn't need your cookies!  Arrive on time!"

Offline Alpo

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 9,257
  • Je suis Janusz Korwin-Mikke
  • Faith: I'm a Vegan
  • Jurisdiction: But my heart belongs to ROCOR
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2015, 02:04:31 AM »
Not my language, but a local language anyway. Swedish: Härre förbarma.
But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.
Leviticus 19:34

Offline rakovsky

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 10,465
  • St. Mstislav I
    • The Old Testament Prophecies of the Messiah's Resurrection and Orthodox Christianity's roots in the Holy Land
  • Faith: Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church in America
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2015, 02:14:50 AM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".
The ocean, infinite to men, and the worlds beyond it, are directed by the same ordinances of the Lord. ~ I Clement 20

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,350
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: POC, but my heart belongs to Antioch
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2015, 06:11:14 AM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".

Actually, it is the same, as in some pronunciation variants of Church Slavonic "g" is pronunced as "g"; moreover, even in other variants it's not clear "h", but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Musashi

  • 主、憐れめよ !
  • Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 287
  • GLORY TO GOD FOR ALL THINGS!
    • The Orthodox Church in Japan (belongs to church)
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: J A P A N
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2015, 07:27:01 AM »
主憐れめよ
Shu awaremeyo
Shu = Lord
awaremeyo = have mercy
主や、爾の民を救い、爾の業に福を降し、吾が國に幸いを與へ、爾の十字架にて爾の住所を守り給え -TROPARION OF HOLY CROSS-

Offline Laurentius

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 140
  • Look at the birds of the air... (Mt 6:26)
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2015, 02:11:15 PM »
Not my language, but a local language anyway. Swedish: Härre förbarma.

Wrong grammar and wrong spelling but cool anyway! :)  It should be "Herre förbarma Dig".
Holy Mother of God, save us!

Offline RaphaCam

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,535
  • It is honourable to reveal the works of God
    • Em Espírito e em Verdade
  • Faith: Big-O Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Exarchate of Gotham City
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2015, 07:45:37 AM »
Portuguese: "Senhor, tem piedade."

I always use Greek "Kyrie, eleison" though.
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

Check my blog "Em Espírito e em Verdade" (in Portuguese)

Offline rakovsky

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 10,465
  • St. Mstislav I
    • The Old Testament Prophecies of the Messiah's Resurrection and Orthodox Christianity's roots in the Holy Land
  • Faith: Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church in America
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2015, 08:23:23 AM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".

Actually, it is the same, as in some pronunciation variants of Church Slavonic "g" is pronunced as "g"; moreover, even in other variants it's not clear "h", but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه
So there are four H/G sounds:

English/German H
English/German G
Scottish Ch / German Ch / Russian X
Ukrainian Ґ

And this, which I don't understand:
Quote
Ch has been used in the Polish language to represent the "soft h" /x/ as it is pronounced in the Polish word chleb "bread", and the h to represent "hard h", /ɦ/ where it is distinct, as it is pronounced in the Polish word hak "hook". Between World War I and World War II, the Polish intelligentsia used to exaggerate the "hardness" of the hard Polish h to aid themselves in proper spelling. In most present-day Polish dialects, however, ch and h are uniformly collapsed as /x/.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch_%28digraph%29#Polish


Which of these do you mean when you say: "moreover, even in other variants it's not clear 'h', but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه"
« Last Edit: November 25, 2015, 08:23:46 AM by rakovsky »
The ocean, infinite to men, and the worlds beyond it, are directed by the same ordinances of the Lord. ~ I Clement 20

Offline LizaSymonenko

  • Слава Ісусу Христу!!! Glory to Jesus Christ!!!
  • Global Moderator
  • Hoplitarches
  • ******
  • Posts: 15,547
    • St.Mary the Protectress Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A.
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2015, 10:48:18 AM »
Ukrainian:  Господи помилуй!  Hospody Pomyluj!
Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,350
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: POC, but my heart belongs to Antioch
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2015, 02:21:47 PM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".

Actually, it is the same, as in some pronunciation variants of Church Slavonic "g" is pronunced as "g"; moreover, even in other variants it's not clear "h", but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه
So there are four H/G sounds:

English/German H
English/German G
Scottish Ch / German Ch / Russian X
Ukrainian Ґ

And this, which I don't understand:
Quote
Ch has been used in the Polish language to represent the "soft h" /x/ as it is pronounced in the Polish word chleb "bread", and the h to represent "hard h", /ɦ/ where it is distinct, as it is pronounced in the Polish word hak "hook". Between World War I and World War II, the Polish intelligentsia used to exaggerate the "hardness" of the hard Polish h to aid themselves in proper spelling. In most present-day Polish dialects, however, ch and h are uniformly collapsed as /x/.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch_%28digraph%29#Polish


Which of these do you mean when you say: "moreover, even in other variants it's not clear 'h', but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه"
Indeed, in Polish we have "ch" and "h", still being different in writing (orthography) but in sound rather not, after the IIWW, as it's said in the article, and that's unfortunate, however, I think in some parts of Poland the difference is still observed. So, "h" is similar to Arabic  ه, and "h" is very close to Ukrainian "h too", so I meant this sound in Church Slavonic pronunciation, writing about something between "h" and "g".
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

Offline Tallitot

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,965
    • USCJ
  • Faith: Jewish(Conservative)
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2015, 02:43:43 PM »
hebrew:
Hashem Yerachem (ה' ירחם)
Proverbs 22:7

Offline Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,280
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: OCA
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2015, 03:15:21 PM »
Hashem

Doesn't that mean "the name"?

Is there is proper Hebrew word for Lord?

Offline Tallitot

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,965
    • USCJ
  • Faith: Jewish(Conservative)
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2015, 03:54:55 PM »
I guess the closest would "Adonai", Master.
Proverbs 22:7

Offline William T

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,481
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Antioch
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2015, 04:03:16 PM »
Arabic: Ya rabbu rham

French: Seigneur, prends pitié
Holy Toledo!

Offline Agabus

  • The user formerly known as Agabus.
  • Section Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,564
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2015, 05:10:04 PM »
We say "Lord, have mercy" in my language.
Blessed Nazarius practiced the ascetic life. His clothes were tattered. He wore his shoes without removing them for six years.

THE OPINIONS HERE MAY NOT REFLECT THE ACTUAL OR PERCEIVED ORTHODOX CHURCH

Offline Opus118

  • Site Supporter
  • Archon
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,274
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2015, 05:37:03 PM »
We say "Lord, have mercy" in my language.

Google translate says we should be using "Sir, have mercy". But you only get this if you put a comma between Kyrie and eleison. If you leave it out it is just plain Sir Mercy.
"Mi tío es enfermo, pero la carretera es verde!" - old Chilean saying

Offline rakovsky

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 10,465
  • St. Mstislav I
    • The Old Testament Prophecies of the Messiah's Resurrection and Orthodox Christianity's roots in the Holy Land
  • Faith: Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church in America
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #28 on: November 25, 2015, 06:32:34 PM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".

Actually, it is the same, as in some pronunciation variants of Church Slavonic "g" is pronunced as "g"; moreover, even in other variants it's not clear "h", but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه
So there are four H/G sounds:

English/German H
English/German G
Scottish Ch / German Ch / Russian X
Ukrainian Ґ

And this, which I don't understand:
Quote
Ch has been used in the Polish language to represent the "soft h" /x/ as it is pronounced in the Polish word chleb "bread", and the h to represent "hard h", /ɦ/ where it is distinct, as it is pronounced in the Polish word hak "hook". Between World War I and World War II, the Polish intelligentsia used to exaggerate the "hardness" of the hard Polish h to aid themselves in proper spelling. In most present-day Polish dialects, however, ch and h are uniformly collapsed as /x/.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch_%28digraph%29#Polish


Which of these do you mean when you say: "moreover, even in other variants it's not clear 'h', but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه"
Indeed, in Polish we have "ch" and "h", still being different in writing (orthography) but in sound rather not, after the IIWW, as it's said in the article, and that's unfortunate, however, I think in some parts of Poland the difference is still observed. So, "h" is similar to Arabic  ه, and "h" is very close to Ukrainian "h too", so I meant this sound in Church Slavonic pronunciation, writing about something between "h" and "g".
Dominika:

You see, these are the only three sounds that I really differentiate mentally well:
English-German H / Ukrainian Г
English-German-Polish G  / Russian Г
Scottish-German-Polish Ch / Russian - Ukrainian X
(American English writing sometimes uses Scottish Ch, but we just pronounce it as K in American English, or due to a misunderstanding pronounce it as Polish "Cz")

So Polish hard "h" / Ukrainian "Ґ" sound is hard for me to think of. It's like me hearing a dog whistle, which dogs can do, or visualizing ultraviolet light, which flies or bees can do.

So it's even more hard when you say:
Quote
So, "h" is similar to Arabic  ه, and "h" is very close to Ukrainian "h too",
Now you are getting into differences between sounds I have a hard time distinguishing in the first place!
« Last Edit: November 25, 2015, 06:39:25 PM by rakovsky »
The ocean, infinite to men, and the worlds beyond it, are directed by the same ordinances of the Lord. ~ I Clement 20

Offline Dominika

  • Troublesome Sheep
  • Global Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,350
  • Serbian/Polish
    • My youtube channel
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: POC, but my heart belongs to Antioch
Re: "LORD, HAVE MERCY" in your languages
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2015, 09:27:48 AM »
In Bulgarian it is Gospodi pomilui.
That would be the same for Church slavic, except the G is pronounced as an "h".

Actually, it is the same, as in some pronunciation variants of Church Slavonic "g" is pronunced as "g"; moreover, even in other variants it's not clear "h", but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه
So there are four H/G sounds:

English/German H
English/German G
Scottish Ch / German Ch / Russian X
Ukrainian Ґ

And this, which I don't understand:
Quote
Ch has been used in the Polish language to represent the "soft h" /x/ as it is pronounced in the Polish word chleb "bread", and the h to represent "hard h", /ɦ/ where it is distinct, as it is pronounced in the Polish word hak "hook". Between World War I and World War II, the Polish intelligentsia used to exaggerate the "hardness" of the hard Polish h to aid themselves in proper spelling. In most present-day Polish dialects, however, ch and h are uniformly collapsed as /x/.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch_%28digraph%29#Polish


Which of these do you mean when you say: "moreover, even in other variants it's not clear 'h', but something between "h" and "g", a bit similar to Arabic ه"
Indeed, in Polish we have "ch" and "h", still being different in writing (orthography) but in sound rather not, after the IIWW, as it's said in the article, and that's unfortunate, however, I think in some parts of Poland the difference is still observed. So, "h" is similar to Arabic  ه, and "h" is very close to Ukrainian "h too", so I meant this sound in Church Slavonic pronunciation, writing about something between "h" and "g".
Dominika:

You see, these are the only three sounds that I really differentiate mentally well:
English-German H / Ukrainian Г
English-German-Polish G  / Russian Г
Scottish-German-Polish Ch / Russian - Ukrainian X
(American English writing sometimes uses Scottish Ch, but we just pronounce it as K in American English, or due to a misunderstanding pronounce it as Polish "Cz")

So Polish hard "h" / Ukrainian "Ґ" sound is hard for me to think of. It's like me hearing a dog whistle, which dogs can do, or visualizing ultraviolet light, which flies or bees can do.

So it's even more hard when you say:
Quote
So, "h" is similar to Arabic  ه, and "h" is very close to Ukrainian "h too",
Now you are getting into differences between sounds I have a hard time distinguishing in the first place!

Yeah, I see that it may be difficult to understand, I'm also not specialist in phonology. I just would say that these sounds are very similar, but I'm not sure if they're exactly the same - having experience in learning different languages (Polish, Serbian, Arabic, English, Hindi, Farsi, Egyptian Arabic, Spanish, Church Slavonic and a bit of Ukrainian and a few other) I would say that we can't put the sounds in some, let's say, frames, and say that they have exact equvalents in other language, rather, that they're close to some certain sounds in other languages
Pray for persecuted Christians, especially in Serbian Kosovo and Raška, Egypt and Syria

My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)