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Author Topic: How did you enter the church?  (Read 2138 times) Average Rating: 0
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wretched sinner
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« on: June 15, 2005, 04:09:53 AM »

I'm trying to get an idea of how one goes from convert to catechumen.
I attend church every week, and it seems that there is great difficulty
in becoming a catechumen. There is a lot of resistance
to newcomers, especially if they don't speak Russian.

I understand that it is really asking a lot of the priest, because it isn't
merely a classroom experience, but requires a very deep level of
commitment on his part. So, what I would like is to
hear from you is how you became a catechumen, and I would
like to have some recommendations on how I should
prepare myself.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2005, 04:12:34 AM by wretched sinner » Logged

Kyrie eleison
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2005, 04:36:41 AM »

Er...talk to a priest.

I really don't know what else to suggest. You just walk up to him and say that you would like to become a catechumen and then he'll take you from there. I don't know what the difficulty is that you're referring to.

James
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2005, 07:24:12 AM »

Hey, there...

I had been meeting with my priest about once a week, every other week.  I was working at a Baptist Church at the time in several capacities and knew that I'd have to resign if I were to do this, as becoming a catechumen is being united to the Church (at least, it's the first step).  After I did this and had been attending the Orthodox parish exclusively for several months, I was received via a simple prayer after Father gave the homily one Sunday. 

Thanks for asking.
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2005, 12:04:17 PM »

Hi,
A few suggestions for you:

Call the Priest, and make an appt. to discuss everything on your mind, one on one.   That way the time will be put aside for you.

Keep attending Services

Join small ministry groups.   

Things will fall into place.   People will get to know you, the Priest will probably see you at ministry activities, and before long, it will become home.

And, most of all, ask God to lead you.

Irene Smiley

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wretched sinner
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2005, 11:03:00 AM »

"I really don't know what else to suggest. You just walk up to him and say that you would like to become a catechumen and then he'll take you from there. I don't know what the difficulty is that you're referring to."

James


I have spoken to the priest. He said the class for converts is only given in Russian.
He hasn't the resources to hold a class for me in English. He is very busy with
his parishioners, and is really stretched thin from his commitments.
I live in a rural area and drive about 100 miles round trip to church,
and so I don't really have much choice but to go to this church. They
only have a liturgy in English once in a while, so I follow along during the Russian
service as best I can. I was really hoping to get an idea of what to read
in order to prepare myself.



"And, most of all, ask God to lead you."

Irene Smiley

Thank you, and may God bless you. Please pray for me.


« Last Edit: June 17, 2005, 11:05:12 AM by wretched sinner » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2005, 12:27:44 PM »

I usually go through the main doors, but sometimes I come in through the kitchen.

There are a lot of lists for great books for newbies. 

Check out this thread http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=3813.0

I think you'll find a great list.

Sorry about the whole Russian only thing.  That's a real bummer.  There aren't any other orthodox churches even close?  Well, the other approach is to learn Russian. 
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2005, 12:41:27 PM »

  I know it would be highly un-orthodox (no pun intended), but maybe he could put you in contact with another priest who could give you lessons through e-mail for the basic facts and theology about Orthodoxy, and your priest could monitor your spiritual well being.  My class was taught by the deacon, my priest only did a couple of the leasons.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2005, 12:42:34 PM by Landon77 » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2005, 12:42:07 PM »

I usually go through the main doors, but sometimes I come in through the kitchen.


!*RIM SHOT*!

I had a strange feeling that that answer was going to show up. ÂÂ You're definitely on a roll today, Cizinec ÂÂ  Cheesy

Ebor
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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2005, 01:22:47 PM »

I know.  That one was way to easy . . . but that's why I had to do it.
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« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2005, 05:33:25 PM »

Check out the Rainbow Series by Fr. Thomas Hopko at the OCA website...all four books are available to view online:

Doctrine
Worship
Bible and Church History
Spirituality
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« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2005, 05:34:19 PM »

I usually go through the main doors, but sometimes I come in through the kitchen.


 Grin I was thinking something like that too..though i usually go in through the office side so the kids can get a potty break first...*cough*

though the fact that he is too busy doesnt seem fair...I am realising how lucky i am to live in such a large metropolitan area!
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« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2005, 09:02:15 PM »

I think that priests answer is outragious! Shocked

He knows enough English to say he cannot teach a person in English!?!

That sounds to me like Russian for "we don't like your kind around here".

Whatever happened to the Great Commission? This could be a great example of an immigrant church that turns away potential converts until all the grandchildren have Americanized and moved away.

+T+
Michael
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