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Author Topic: God is going to get His mail today (no foolin'!)!  (Read 980 times) Average Rating: 0
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MBZ
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« on: June 15, 2005, 04:09:09 AM »

Hi all!

Sometimes I just love my job!

I issued this press release last Thursday:

Quote
You are invited to view the notes and letters that were addressed to G-d and sent via the Israel Postal Authority (http://tinyurl.com/a4vnw) to be placed between the stones of the Western Wall (http://tinyurl.com/ypv53).

The event will take place on Wednesday, the 15th of June 2005.

10:00 -- Gathering of the letters from the Israel Postal Authority, 26 Beit Hadafus Street, Givat Shaul, Jerusalem. A postal courier will transport the letters to the Western Wall.

11:00 -- Transfer of the letters to the Western Wall for placement between the stones in the presence of the Rabbi of the Western Wall, Rabbi Shmuel Rabinovitch and the Director General of the Israel Postal Authority, Mr. Yossi Shelley.

The Postal Authority here does this at least once a year. Here is an old AP story from 2003:

Quote
Jerusalem postal workers deal with letters to God

by jason keyser
the associated press

jerusalem | Ever felt your prayers went unanswered? Try sending a letter to God and chances are it will end up — as many do each year — at an Israeli post office in Jerusalem, where they are read and sent on to the holy Western Wall.

The letters come from all over the world in a host of languages. The elderly ask for good health. Others seek heavenly remedies for debts, relationship assistance, or help finding jobs. Children mainly ask God to spring them from homework assignments. The trickle of requests turns into a flood around Christmas and the Jewish holidays.

“We have hundreds and thousands of letters sent to either God or Jesus Christ and for some unknown reason they all come to Jerusalem,’’ said Yitzhak Rabihiya, a postal spokesman.

“Dear Sir,’’ begins one letter whose address reads “God of Israel’’ and whose request is for assistance landing a job as a bulldozer driver.

One Israeli man used to write twice a year in the same distinctive handwriting, addressing the envelopes to “Angels above in Seventh Heaven.’’

As long as anyone at the post office can remember, the letters to God have turned up at the Postal Authority’s center for undeliverable mail in an industrial zone in Jerusalem.

In the tiny warehouse, eight workers sort problem envelopes into pigeon holes labeled for junk mail, government bureaus, social security and health insurance offices and “Letters to God.’’

Ten such pleas for divine intervention have arrived in the last couple of days, some from the United States, France, Nigeria, Australia and Ecuador. One came — somehow — with no stamps.

Puzzled by what to do with the letters, one worker started taking them to the Western Wall, a remnant of the ancient Second Temple compound and Judaism’s holiest site, where Jews traditionally stuff tiny notes of prayer in the cracks between its hulking stones.

“From there, it’s not in our hands,’’ Rabihiya said.

Eventually, the notes and letters left at the Wall are buried on Jerusalem’s outskirts along with damaged religious texts and other materials considered too holy for the garbage dump.

The notes offer a sometimes charming glimpse into people’s private wishes. One man asks for forgiveness for stealing money from a grocery store as a child.

Another man from Saulsbury, Tenn., wrote a tiny message and asked the postmaster to deliver it to the Western Wall, because he heard a rumor that would work. It reads: “Please help me to be happy. Please help me find a nice job in Tallahassee or Monroe or some nice place and find a good wife — soon. Amen, Daryl.’’

One writer asked God to answer a friend’s prayers, and in a postscript gives the friend’s address, adding, “But you knew that.’’

A chain letter in Arabic from “the Virgin Mary’’ called for peace in Bosnia and asked the recipient to send the letter to 20 other people.

The notes also speak of tragedy, relaying desperate prayers from people who are in trouble or lonely.

The postal workers recently suffered their own loss and grief. Yitzhak Moyal, 63, one of the workers who took the letters to the Western Wall, was killed in a suicide bombing on May 18.

Avi Yaniv, head of the undeliverable mail department, said friends have told him he and his crew are like God’s deputies because they shuttle people’s prayers to the Wall.

Some letters touch him, such as one from a Kenyan man asking God to save his marriage. “I believe in God, so I want to help these people,’’ the 60-year-old Yaniv said.

The postal workers’ favorite anecdote is about an Israeli man who, years ago, wrote a letter to God describing his crippling poverty and asking for 5,000 skekels ($1,000). Postal workers were so moved they collected 4,300 shekels and mailed it back.

“After a month the same person writes again to God,’’ Rabihiya recalled, “but this time he writes, ‘Oh, thank you God for the contribution, but next time please don’t send it through those postmen. They’re thieves; they stole 700 shekels.

See the photos from March 2004 at http://www.sassontiram.com/absoluteig/gallery.asp?categoryid=131.

Be well!

MBZ
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"Peace, peace to him that is far off and to him that is near." [Isaiah 57:19]

"Gather your wits and hold on fast..." [The Who]

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Ebor
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2005, 09:42:34 AM »

Thank you for posting this. While I knew about the little noted in the cracks of the stones at the Western Wall, I hadn't heard of the letters before.

Ebor
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cizinec
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2005, 10:29:33 AM »

What a great story!  Thanks for posting it.
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2005, 12:17:33 PM »

Fery Interestink......


Never knew this was going on. Kinda cool at that.
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2005, 02:23:30 PM »

Very Cool.
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Now where were we? Oh yeah - the important thing was I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn’t have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones...
MBZ
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2005, 04:04:52 PM »

Hi all!

This was in today's Haaretz:

Quote
Send God a letter, but don't forget the stamp

By Jonathan Lis

An urban legend has been circulating in the Postal Authority for years about a letter to God that landed in the dead letter department. The postal employees decided to open it and found that a poor man had sent an emotional appeal to God to send him NIS 5,000 so he could celebrate an upcoming holiday properly. Touched, the postal workers decided to take up a collection for the man. They raised NIS 4,300 and sent it to the return address on the envelope. Two weeks later, another letter to God came from the man. This time when they opened it, they found a thank-you note. "I am so grateful that you answered my prayer," the man had written. "But next time, don't send the money through the mail - those postal workers stole NIS 700."

Three years ago, the Postal Authority decided not to open such letters nor to return them to their senders. Instead, the hundreds of letters addressed to "God, the Western Wall, Jerusalem," are brought to their destination and placed between the ancient stones.

Yesterday, Postal Authority director general Yossi Sheli and the Western Wall Rabbi Shmuel Rabinovich placed more than 1,000 missives to the Almighty in the Western Wall.

"Letters to God come in from all over the world," the Postal Authority spokesman, Itzhak Rav Yihiya, said. "Schoolchildren as well as adults actually put letters in envelopes, buy stamps and send them, hoping they will reach their destination. We see it as our mission to transfer these letters to the Western Wall."

Writing to perceived higher powers seems to be a worldwide phenomenon. Among popular addresses are also Jesus and Santa Claus.

In the past, the number of letters to God arriving each year in Jerusalem was small. But since the Postal Authority began publicizing its practice of taking the letters to the Western Wall, the trickle has increased to a regular flow. Among letters received recently is one from China, and 24 from schoolchildren in Hong Kong. The number of letters usually increases around Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Christmas.

The Postal Authority processes 2 million letters each day at its three distribution centers in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa. Those that cannot be delivered are sent to the dead letter department. "In recent years we have developed a special policy with regard to letters to God, and we keep them in a special pile," Rav Yihiya said, adding that the postal workers do not open the letters or read them.

"We don't know what people are asking for in the letters we put into the Wall," Rav Yihiya said. "From the experience of those who used to read the letters in the past in an attempt to find out who they were from so they could be sent back, we know that they are usually from people who are in trouble and are asking for the usual things like health, a livelihood and love, or who feel they have committed various sins."

Postal Authority sources say their only worry now is how they will process a letter to God that comes by registered mail.

Link: http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/588612.html

Be well!

MBZ
« Last Edit: June 16, 2005, 04:07:50 PM by MBZ » Logged

"Peace, peace to him that is far off and to him that is near." [Isaiah 57:19]

"Gather your wits and hold on fast..." [The Who]

"Lose your dreams and you could lose your mind." [The Rolling Stones]

http://tinyurl.com/bvskq

[url=htt
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