Author Topic: Daily prayers  (Read 2660 times)

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Offline Shamati

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Daily prayers
« on: February 02, 2015, 03:47:40 PM »
Hi,

I have a prayerbook that contains almost the exact same prayers as the Jordanville prayerbook (with maybe 1 or 2 prayers changed in the morning & Evening prayers) but I find it hard to find the time to actually read all the morning prayers every morning because I manage to be late :/ It also contains the prayer rule of St Seraphim of Sarov "for busy people"; Lords prayer x 3, Hymn to the theotokos x 3 & the creed - which I've used for some time now.

Do anyone skip some prayers in the ones for each morning & evening? Or "should" one read everyone of them?

What is an akathist & Canon? What's the difference between them & ordinary prayers?
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 03:55:51 PM by Shamati »

Offline IXOYE

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2015, 04:16:58 PM »
There is the "Little Red Prayer Book" as it is popularly known put out by the Antiochian Archdiocese.  This particular prayer book is much more abbreviated that the Jordanville edition.

Offline IXOYE

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2015, 04:20:22 PM »
An Akathist Hymn is a hymn to Christ, to the Theotokos or a Saint.  A Supplicatory Canon is a service of intercession to Christ, the Theotokos or a Saint.  Both are used in addition to Morning and Evening Prayers.  They do not replace Morning and Evening Prayers.

Offline scamandrius

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2015, 11:24:55 PM »
Hi,

I have a prayerbook that contains almost the exact same prayers as the Jordanville prayerbook (with maybe 1 or 2 prayers changed in the morning & Evening prayers) but I find it hard to find the time to actually read all the morning prayers every morning because I manage to be late :/ It also contains the prayer rule of St Seraphim of Sarov "for busy people"; Lords prayer x 3, Hymn to the theotokos x 3 & the creed - which I've used for some time now.

Do anyone skip some prayers in the ones for each morning & evening? Or "should" one read everyone of them?

What is an akathist & Canon? What's the difference between them & ordinary prayers?

Normally, a rule of prayer, especially for a catechumen or inquirer, is made in consultation with a priest.  Unless i am mistaken, you have not even conferred with a priest yet which is fine.  The problem for any newcomer is the want to do too much, too soon with no or little idea where to go.  I am not a priest so I am not really comfortable giving you advice, but you should know that even the most experienced of Orthodox skip or omit prayers either deliberately or for whatever reason.  I would learn the trisagion prayers gir both mirning and night and one additional prayer each for morning and evening and make it YOUR prayer.  But, seriously, make cintact with a priest.
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Offline Peacemaker

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2015, 11:45:33 PM »
St. John of Kronstadt said

"Some believe that their whole welfare and their exactitude before God consists in the reading of all the appointed prayers, without paying attention to the preparedness of their hearts for prayer to God, nor to their inward amendment. Many, for instance, thus read the prayers appointed before Holy Communion ; whilst at this time we should, above all, look to the amendment and preparedness of the heart to receive the Holy Sacrament. If your heart is right in your bosom; if, by God's mercy, it is ready to meet the Bridegroom, then, thank God, it is well with you, even although you have not succeeded in reading all the appointed prayers." For the kingdom of God is not in word, but in power." Obedience to our mother, the Church, in everything is right; and if it is possible for one "to receive" prolonged prayer, let him pray long. But "all men cannot receive this saying." If long prayer is not compatible with fervor of spirit, then it is better to say a short but fervent prayer. Remember that the one word of the publican, said from a fervent heart, justified him. God does not look at the multitude of words, but upon the disposition of the heart. The chief thing is lively faith and fervent repentance for sins."

However, one should always work with their spiritual father to figure out a prayer rule that fits your strengths and needs. If you find yourself not being able to keep the prayer rule you and your spiritual father agree on, confess it to him and he'll work with you.

An akathist (Greek, akathistos) is a hymn dedicated to a saint, holy event, or one of the persons of the Holy Trinity. You can find akathistos dedicated to many different saints (if not all of them?). These are normally said on feast days, for example for the feast day of St. Seraphim of Sarov, you can say an akathist to St. Seraphim. This is a special way of honoring that saint. Most monasteries will read akathist to a certain saint in a special location and dedicate that location to the saint. For example, at Holy Cross Monastery they have a St. Herman of Alaska cave where they have an icon of the St. and go there during his feast day to read the akathist. It is nice also to read the akathist for your own name saint. It is a Greek tradition in monasteries to read the akathist to the theotokos before bed. These are nice ways to remind us of the lives of the saints, to keep us in prayer and to honor the saints.

Canons, also known as Supplicatory Canons are prayers of supplication, supplication simply means the action of asking or begging for something earnestly or humbly. You can find Canons to many different Saints for many different reasons. There is a repentance canon which I like to read before I take communion. There are canons to St Mary of Egypt to help fight against internet pornography. A number of canons are to the theotokos to help cure cancer or a canon for someone who has aborted a child. Canons for family, health, well being, struggle with the passions etc etc etc. Canons are normally prayed when you are wanting something, that something varies from person to person.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 11:56:56 PM by Peacemaker »

Offline DeniseDenise

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2015, 11:58:59 PM »
It's not going to make a daily rule for you, as Scamandrius is absolutely right(mark this date down) in that you need to talk with a priest.

That said I can also highly recommend 'beginning to pray' a book by Metropolitan Anthony (Bloom) of Sourozh

It is a wonderful easy reading book and has helped me a lot.
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Offline Christina

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2015, 03:03:34 AM »
Do anyone skip some prayers in the ones for each morning & evening? Or "should" one read everyone of them?

I don't skip some prayers when I'm reading, but I do use different ones.  I rotate between the morning and evening prayers in the back of The Orthodox Study Bible, A Prayer Book for Orthodox Christians, and online.

What is an akathist & Canon? What's the difference between them & ordinary prayers?

Akathist:  Variant spelling of acathistus.  Any of several Lenten hymns of the Eastern Orthodox Church sung with the people standing in honor of Christ, the Virgin Mary, or one of the saints.

Canon:  A structured hymn consisting of nine odes based on compositions found in the Bible.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2015, 03:07:10 AM by Christina »
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Offline LBK

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2015, 03:21:01 AM »
A clarification: While the "original" akathist, written in honor of the Mother of God, is sung liturgically during Great Lent, akathist hymns themselves are not inherently lenten in character.  :)
« Last Edit: February 03, 2015, 03:21:30 AM by LBK »
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Offline Christina

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2015, 03:43:50 AM »
In the Greek tradition, the only akathist permitted in formal liturgical use is the original akathist.  I don't know what others do.
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Offline Shamati

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2015, 12:51:07 PM »
I have spoken to a priest, but not about a daily prayer rule yet.

Anyway, I pray daily either way & I felt urged to accustom myself to read from an orthodox prayerbook because the prayers are more profound & practically arranged.

What is troparions, kontakions & theotokion's & how do they differ from other regular prayers?

Offline scamandrius

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2015, 05:47:14 PM »
In the Greek tradition, the only akathist permitted in formal liturgical use is the original akathist.  I don't know what others do.

The Russians seem to have compiled a large volume of akathists for many occasions, saints, feasts and what-not.  Those are NOT part of the Greek tradition though I know many who have incorporated them into their own personal prayers say at Compline.
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Offline scamandrius

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2015, 05:51:10 PM »
I have spoken to a priest, but not about a daily prayer rule yet.

Anyway, I pray daily either way & I felt urged to accustom myself to read from an orthodox prayerbook because the prayers are more profound & practically arranged.

What is troparions, kontakions & theotokion's & how do they differ from other regular prayers?

Troparia are hymns of the day say to a saint, a feast or for the resurrection.  Sometimes called apolytikia (dismissal hymns).

Kontakia are also hymns to a saint, feast or resurrection. These were probably earlier in use than the troparia. Kontakion means scroll and were perhaps originally summations of all of the hymns together for that occasion.  The troparia supplanted them.

Theotokia are hymns to the mother of God focussing on the incarnation and how the Virgin is the seal of our faith, just as she was the seal which brought forth Christ.  Every Resurrectional Apolytikion has a corresponding Theotokion in the same tone. 

There are a lot of nuances here especially for a beginner. As a chanter and someone who knows how to put services together, I could get into all of those complexities, but I'd rather not. I would just stick to what is in the prayerbook.
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Offline hecma925

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2015, 09:50:51 PM »
In the Greek tradition, the only akathist permitted in formal liturgical use is the original akathist.  I don't know what others do.

The Russians seem to have compiled a large volume of akathists for many occasions, saints, feasts and what-not.  Those are NOT part of the Greek tradition though I know many who have incorporated them into their own personal prayers say at Compline.

I pray the Akathist throughout the week when I do my prayers.  I may read others for personal edification when it's quiet at work (lately, the Akathist to Ss. Joachim and Anna).
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Offline Yurysprudentsiya

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Re: Daily prayers
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2015, 10:43:57 PM »
St. John of Kronstadt's advice, as brought to you by Peacemaker above, is worthy of reading and re-reading.

I do not wish to divulge the particulars of my own prayer life here but I will say that what St. John says above is inherently wise and worth emulating. 

When it is possible, you should speak to your priest to receive guidance about this important issue.