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TomS
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« on: June 06, 2005, 10:22:12 AM »

CNN BREAKING NEWS:

U.S. Supreme Court rules federal authorities may prosecute sick people who smoke marijuana on doctors’ orders.

------------

Yeah, this is exactly how I want my tax money spent.
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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2005, 11:10:06 AM »

TomS,
It would be help if you would post a link or paste the whole article as opposed to some one-line soundbite.
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2005, 11:12:16 AM »

Marijuana should be legalized immediately. (No, I have never smoked it nor do I think it is good).

However, I bet the reasoning is that it is illegal to possess still and so the court is just backing up the law. Sometimes the law and what we view as right is not always in alignment.

[If we want to debate this issue let's keep it from getting into Republicans vs. Democrats or personal candidates, etc.]
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2005, 11:20:49 AM »

It's NATIONAL News - I saw no reason to post the article and use up storage space - but here it is anyway:

Supreme Court allows prosecution of medical marijuana

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal authorities may prosecute sick people who smoke pot on doctors' orders, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, concluding that state medical marijuana laws don't protect users from a federal ban on the drug.

The decision is a stinging defeat for marijuana advocates who had successfully pushed 10 states to allow the drug's use to treat various illnesses.

Justice John Paul Stevens, writing the 6-3 decision, said that Congress could change the law to allow medical use of marijuana.

The closely watched case was an appeal by the Bush administration in a case that it lost in late 2003. At issue was whether the prosecution of medical marijuana users under the federal Controlled Substances Act was constitutional.

Under the Constitution, Congress may pass laws regulating a state's economic activity so long as it involves "interstate commerce" that crosses state borders. The California marijuana in question was homegrown, distributed to patients without charge and without crossing state lines.

Stevens said there are other legal options for patients, "but perhaps even more important than these legal avenues is the democratic process, in which the voices of voters allied with these respondents may one day be heard in the halls of Congress."

California's medical marijuana law, passed by voters in 1996, allows people to grow, smoke or obtain marijuana for medical needs with a doctor's recommendation. Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont and Washington state have laws similar to California.

In those states, doctors generally can give written or oral recommendations on marijuana to patients with cancer, HIV and other serious illnesses.

In a dissent, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said that states should be allowed to set their own rules.

"The states' core police powers have always included authority to define criminal law and to protect the health, safety, and welfare of their citizens," said O'Connor, who was joined by other states' rights advocates.

The legal question presented a dilemma for the court's conservatives, who have pushed to broaden states' rights in recent years, invalidating federal laws dealing with gun possession near schools and violence against women on the grounds the activity was too local to justify federal intrusion.

O'Connor said she would have opposed California's medical marijuana law if she was a voter or a legislator. But she said the court was overreaching to endorse "making it a federal crime to grow small amounts of marijuana in one's own home for one's own medicinal use."

The case concerned two seriously ill California women, Angel Raich and Diane Monson. The two had sued then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, asking for a court order letting them smoke, grow or obtain marijuana without fear of arrest, home raids or other intrusion by federal authorities.

Raich, an Oakland woman suffering from ailments including scoliosis, a brain tumor, chronic nausea, fatigue and pain, smokes marijuana every few hours. She said she was partly paralyzed until she started smoking pot. Monson, an accountant who lives near Oroville, California, has degenerative spine disease and grows her own marijuana plants in her backyard.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2005, 11:53:22 AM »

Unfortunately, the decision wasn’t even close at 6-3. The Supreme’s were actually following federal law in this regard. The problem is that there is a huge gap between some states that allow it as compared to the federal level where it is not. Of course it looks like once again the federal triumphs over state’s rights. The problem really is with the Congress, which has done everything to criminalize marijuana. This kind of pisses me off also, drugs like marijuana should not be criminalized.
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2005, 12:22:09 PM »

Thank you TomS - that wasn't that hard and didn't take up that much bandwidth, was it?  Although you (and I most of the time) check the headlines daily, many don't, so I wouldn't make sweeping assumptions.
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2005, 12:49:39 PM »

Interesting....I just read that it was the conservatives on the court who were the dissenters. I would have thought the more left-wing judges would have been the dissenters in the decision. I guess it came down to the whole states rights vs. federal issue again. I think another big thing in play here are all the lobyist for the prisons/law enforcement agencies. Crime is big business and they want to see to it that their cash cow in criminalizing marijuana is upheld. I find it all very disturbing, I could care less if a little weed makes a sickly 70 year old live without terminal pain.  :flame: 
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2005, 02:55:03 PM »

Considering that the Bush administration esteems medical marijuana to be the equivalent of "medicinal crack", I am not surprised by this story.
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« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2005, 03:40:33 PM »

Interesting....I just read that it was the conservatives on the court who were the dissenters. I would have thought the more left-wing judges would have been the dissenters in the decision.
That is interresting, because I'm very conservitive and I think it should be totally legalized.
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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2005, 03:44:16 PM »

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Marijuana should be legalized immediately. (No, I have never smoked it nor do I think it is good).

Agreed. I go further and say legalize all the drugs, though regulate it like alcohol ("No Snorting and Driving", etc.) and likewise tax its consumption. The violent crime generated over several continents and public resources squandered defies the lack of common sense in maintaining this prohibition.
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« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2005, 04:34:52 PM »

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Agreed.  I go further and say legalize all the drugs, though regulate it like alcohol ("No Snorting and Driving", etc.) and likewise tax its consumption.  The violent crime generated over several continents and public resources squandered defies the lack of common sense in maintaining this prohibition.

I'm with you on that, but it will never happen because of the law enforcement/prison industry loby make their money from keeping such petty things illegal. I think it's a great idea for government to tax the sale of such drugs if it were legal. It would provide so much revenue that it would provide for something really good like healthcare for all americans or cutting down the national debt.

Quote
Considering that the Bush administration esteems medical marijuana to be the equivalent of "medicinal crack", I am not surprised by this story.

Mathew, sorry to burst your bubble but this has nothing to do with the president and democrats because just about all of them are on the same page with keeping marijuana illegal. Some states could have had a small victory here in allowing some sick people to use it. If you are going to assign blame to anyone it should be the leftist in the Supreme Court who decided against it. It's funny seeing the rationale of these people; marijuana bad, abortion good!  Roll Eyes

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« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2005, 05:55:46 PM »

The Supreme Court? O'Conner is a conservative and yet she supports medical marijuana.
This is a simple matter of states' rights, something which the Republican Party used to stand for.
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« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2005, 08:08:29 PM »

I am for the legalization of marijuana only because I know from smoking it as a youth that it is too prevalent to be stopped and because I have relatives who have gone to prison for long periods of time for having miniscule amounts of the drug. Personally I think marijuana is very dangerous and should not be tolerated but if a bunch of guys want to smoke it in their basement I don't think they should do time.


Agreed.  I go further and say legalize all the drugs, though regulate it like alcohol ("No Snorting and Driving", etc.) and likewise tax its consumption.  The violent crime generated over several continents and public resources squandered defies the lack of common sense in maintaining this prohibition.
Strelets I would argue that Amsterdam is a perfect example of why all drugs should not be legalized. Drugs like methamphetamine and heroin just should not be made readily available for anyone who wants to try them. Often people will try these drugs at a party or just to experiment and end up hooked before they realize they have a problem. Most of the guys I know who got into Meth ended up getting severly addicted and spent all their time getting spooled (slang for high on Meth). These drugs just cannot be allowed in a civil society.
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« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2005, 12:00:49 AM »

Personally I think marijuana is very dangerous and should not be tolerated but if a bunch of guys want to smoke it in their basement I don't think they should do time.

Why not, if it's to be "not tolerated?" The only recourse for a government to "not tolerate" something is to throw people in the can.

Drugs like methamphetamine and heroin just should not be made readily available for anyone who wants to try them. Often people will try these drugs at a party or just to experiment and end up hooked before they realize they have a problem. Most of the guys I know who got into Meth ended up getting severly addicted and spent all their time getting spooled (slang for high on Meth). These drugs just cannot be allowed in a civil society.

Well, read what I wrote; the stuff should be legal but regulated, much like alcohol and cigars. Not just anyone could buy it and use it as he wants. But in general, you're right. We live in a wonderfully civil society and I'm glad it's all illegal. It makes me happy that the stuff isn't readily available, people aren't getting readily "spooled", and people aren't frequently getting hooked on meth. While we're at it, let's ban riding the escalators with our hands in the air, because it's addicting and fun (maybe the slight loss in equilibrium destroys a few brain cells, creating a nice high!) and you know some kid will mimic my bevahior and fall down and crack his noggin open. Let's pass a nationwide injunction against tattoos and piercings because besides being unsightly they are high risks for infection and skin cancer. And let's make illegal all high calorie fatty foods because they're the most dangerous items we can ingest and look at all the fat people dying every day from strokes because junk food is addictive. Just look at America and how fat everyone is! Let not the Dutch follow her example, eh? We're all just a bunch of morons who shouldn't be allowed to take responsibility for own lives and if we choose to screw it up -- weeellllll, that can't be legal! And you know what that means -- if I screw up my body, it's your fault for not stopping me.
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« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2005, 12:51:55 AM »

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I am for the legalization of marijuana only because I know from smoking it as a youth that it is too prevalent to be stopped and because I have relatives who have gone to prison for long periods of time for having miniscule amounts of the drug. Personally I think marijuana is very dangerous and should not be tolerated but if a bunch of guys want to smoke it in their basement I don't think they should do time.

Sabbas, I find it quite humerous that you happen to be talking about weed smokin' while you are on post #420!!! LoL..... Grin Sorry, couldn't help myself from being so sophomoric....maybe I smoked too much in highschool myself...  Afro
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« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2005, 01:04:49 AM »

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Why not, if it's to be "not tolerated?"  The only recourse for a government to "not tolerate" something is to throw people in the can.

That's because we have a bunch of 'ninny's', otherwise known as politicians who think they need to regulate everything. Did you see the big parade in Washington with the whole steriods abuse in baseball fiasco? Could anyone seriously care less about a bunch of moronic baseball players juicing up? Sheeeesh, how about doing some real work like say umm balancing the budget for once. I'm also really tired of getting taxed to death by these idiots who probably couldn't even run a hot dog stand, so if it takes legalizing drugs where the government could recieve monies from the sale of these then I'm all for it. I say let the druggies take care of the tax bill and maybe some healthcare for all americans would be nice also if there is enough left over. Let them smoke away... Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2005, 01:37:44 AM »

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Sheeeesh, how about doing some real work like say umm balancing the budget for once.

Ha ha! We Canadians have had a balanced budget for about 7 years in a row or more.
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« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2005, 08:44:23 AM »

We dont have any left wing supreme court justices anymore...Uncle Ron and daddy Bush saw to that.  Tongue

BUT anyway, there is an easily available, natural painkiller out there (weed) and the govt wants to stop it.  Do they not see how much freaking money they would make by regulating, selling and TAXING it? jeese o peetes, people get your heads out of your...armpits and wake up to the possibilities!

no, I have never smoked.  But i did used to roll them for my mom and her friends when i was a tiny kid at parties at Freaky Pete's house...ah, the early 70's. Afro
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« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2005, 02:09:54 PM »



Why not, if it's to be "not tolerated?"  The only recourse for a government to "not tolerate" something is to throw people in the can.

I meant socially. If your friends start using marijuana break off the friendship until they agree to stop. If it is family members do whatever you can, short of violence, to get them to stop.


Well, read what I wrote; the stuff should be legal but regulated, much like alcohol and cigars.  Not just anyone could buy it and use it as he wants.  But in general, you're right.  We live in a wonderfully civil society and I'm glad it's all illegal.  It makes me happy that the stuff isn't readily available, people aren't getting readily "spooled", and people aren't frequently getting hooked on meth.  While we're at it, let's ban riding the escalators with our hands in the air, because it's addicting and fun (maybe the slight loss in equilibrium destroys a few brain cells, creating a nice high!) and you know some kid will mimic my bevahior and fall down and crack his noggin open.  Let's pass a nationwide injunction against tattoos and piercings because besides being unsightly they are high risks for infection and skin cancer.  And let's make illegal all high calorie fatty foods because they're the most dangerous items we can ingest and look at all the fat people dying every day from strokes because junk food is addictive.  Just look at America and how fat everyone is!  Let not the Dutch follow her example, eh?  We're all just a bunch of morons who shouldn't be allowed to take responsibility for own lives and if we choose to screw it up -- weeellllll, that can't be legal!  And you know what that means -- if I screw up my body, it's your fault for not stopping me.
I did read what you wrote. Consider how many kids could get hold of meth if it was legal and regulated. The kids could get some friend who has a brother or sister over twenty-one to buy the stuff for them. Such actions would be illegal but by legalizing drugs and having them made available you open that door.
Quote
It makes me happy that the stuff isn't readily available, people aren't getting readily "spooled", and people aren't frequently getting hooked on meth.
Actually the problem right now is that it is readily available. When I was fourteen my friend's neighbor's garage blew up due to his cooking up meth. In various areas in southeast Iowa there is a meth epidemic. You have paranoid skinny addicts all over the place and it can be dangerous to walk around at night. 
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We're all just a bunch of morons who shouldn't be allowed to take responsibility for own lives

The fact is that the state has a duty to protect it's citizens from danger and drugs are dangerous. It is also a fact that there are a large number of people who tend to make bad choices and we should not just allow them to screw their lives up. I agree it is unfair to always treat drug users as criminals and give them time in prison but you have to do something to help them and get them off the street.
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« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2005, 02:16:04 PM »

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I meant socially. If your friends start using marijuana break off the friendship until they agree to stop. If it is family members do whatever you can, short of violence, to get them to stop.

Certainly social stigmatization is the most effective means of changing improper behavior and lifestyles.  However, we're talking about federal action in this thread.  Its only means for changing the behavior is using some violence or another, namely taking away your freedom.  Sure, we can levy fines but that has little to no effect unless it's backed up with the threat of serious prison time, and even then it doesn't appear to be working given the huge number of drug users filling up our prison system.

Quote
Actually the problem right now is that it is readily available.

I guess my sarcasm didn't come across in my earlier post.  My bad.

Quote
The fact is that the state has a duty to protect it's citizens from danger and drugs are dangerous.

So now we're back to square one -- the government has to put people in prison for drug use.  Several years in prison is dangerous.  What you advocate in effect is, "Don't do that possibly dangerous thing to yoursefl or I'm going to help you by doing something even more dangerous to you -- take away your freedom, ruin your career and family life, and confine you in tight quarters for many years where you'll be gang raped and come out a hardened criminal with little hope in life."  Do you see the irony here?  That's why I say, just legalize but regulate the stuff.  If someone steps outside the regulations, fine them.  But you'll have to come to grips that people will always do drugs.  It's a false belief that we're going to stop a behavior that seeks to chemically intoxicate itself against pain (a behavior existing since the beginning of man) from seeking out the means to do so.
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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2005, 02:31:19 PM »

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We dont have any left wing supreme court justices anymore...Uncle Ron and daddy Bush saw to that.

I'd love to respond to your statement, but that would violate the ban on American political discussion.

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« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2005, 01:41:12 PM »

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Well, read what I wrote; the stuff should be legal but regulated, much like alcohol and cigars. Žot just anyone could buy it and use it as he wants. ‚ut in general, you're right. —e live in a wonderfully civil society and I'm glad it's all illegal. ‰t makes me happy that the stuff isn't readily available, people aren't getting readily "spooled", and people aren't frequently getting hooked on meth. —hile we're at it, let's ban riding the escalators with our hands in the air, because it's addicting and fun (maybe the slight loss in equilibrium destroys a few brain cells, creating a nice high!) and you know some kid will mimic my bevahior and fall down and crack his noggin open. Œet's pass a nationwide injunction against tattoos and piercings because besides being unsightly they are high risks for infection and skin cancer. nd let's make illegal all high calorie fatty foods because they're the most dangerous items we can ingest and look at all the fat people dying every day from strokes because junk food is addictive. Šust look at America and how fat everyone is! Œet not the Dutch follow her example, eh? —e're all just a bunch of morons who shouldn't be allowed to take responsibility for own lives and if we choose to screw it up -- weeellllll, that can't be legal! nd you know what that means -- if I screw up my body, it's your fault for not stopping me.[

This might be the dumbest argument for drug legalization I've ever heard.  How can you possibly be serious?  Am I understanding correctly that you're saying that things shouldn't be made illegal just because they can cause harm even though they may be lethal?  Why do we have regulations on any medication then?  Why not do away with prescriptions all together?  We should be able to go to the pharmacy and buy whatever we want.  We should have responsbility for our own lives.  If I screw up my body, it's my own fault.

I agree to a certain extent that I do have control over my own body, and I have to pay attention to what I do with it, but where you are mistaken is on how much control we should have.  Fast food won't kill somebody the first time they ever try it.  You could eat at a fast food restaurant every single day of 10 years (speaking of which, I know a couple that eat at McDonald's for breakfast and Wendy's for lunch and supper every single day of their lives and they're both very thin and athletic) and it never bother you, but you can't do that with cocaine.  One use and you might die.  Use it everyday for years, and you will surely die or worse, you might turn into Ozzy Osbourne!  This causes an addiction.  No level of regulation is going to prevent that.  Nor will regulations prevent the addicted from going out an buying it on the black market.  What we would end up with would be a bunch of people getting what they could legally and then spending the rest of their hard earned money on it illegally.

Let's also look at the other growing and truly out of control problem of crack babies.  Have you been to a public school in a low income area lately?  I'm guessing not.  The teachers can't do anything with these kids because in an effort to keep mentally challenged kids mainstream, special ed classrooms are being done away with in many places.  So they crack babies once they reach school age are put into regular classrooms.  A teacher can teach at the level that she should when she's dealing with handfuls of children that can't even sit in a chair.  They don't have the mental capacity to function as a normal child.  If you legalize the drugs that their moms were on when they gave birth to them, then you are only creating an even larger source for the problem. "[Americans] are all just a bunch of morons who shouldn't be allowed to take responsibility for own lives..."  Well, why don't we may some more morons so we can't even think logically enough to be able to take responsiblity for our own lives?

There is also a misconception that people are always sent to prison because they are addicted to illegal drugs.  Most people are first sent to rehab.  It typically the repeat offenders and drug dealers that are sent to prison.  There are very few judges this day in age that will automatically send somebody straight to prison for drug us only.  I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but it's rare.  Usually if they ever actually see a court room in the first place, the fact that they were using drugs was the secondary problem.  Usually they were brought in for robbery, assault, etc.  Yet another side effect of using harmful drugs that nobody seems to want to address.  Drugs make people crazy, and they will stop at nothing to get another fix.  Setting half ass regulations isn't going to help that problem.  Legalizing (with regulations even) is only going to increase the number of addicts therefore increasing the harm that will come to society.
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« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2005, 02:38:31 PM »

You're missing the point here, this case had absolutely nothing to do with Drugs, and everything to do with Separation of Powers and the Rights of the Sovereign States as reserved to them by the 10th Amendment. This case is a typical example of an abuse of the worse mistake the founding fathers made (with good intentions) in drafting the constituion, the interstate commerce clause. The argument that the federal government can regulate this area of the economy when everything is grown/produced, marketed, and sold within a single state, with products never crossing state lines, simply because it adds to the over all quanities of the product in the Country is absurd, all commerce does that, surely we are not to assume that the founding fathers intended this interpretation, if they did, why say 'interstate commerce' and not just 'commerce'? Though I admit that Justice Scalia presented a better argument than the rest of the majority, and tried to limit continued excessive abuse of the interstate commerce clause, I do not believe he succeded in preventing United States v. Lopez from being religated to irrelevance, and violating the funamental principles of the 10th Amendment and Joint Sovereignty; he seemed to allow his morals and principles to get in the way of his job, the worse disservice a Justice can do to the Constitution and the Country.



'The powers delegated by the proposed constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite. . . . The powers reserved to the several States will extend toall the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State.'
--James Madison, The Federalist No. 45, pp. 292—293 (C. Rossiter ed. 1961); quoted in Dissenting Opinion


[P.S. Admins, politically charged issues come up from time to time and many people seem interested in discussing them...I understand the no american political discussion in the fourms policy, but why not create a forum dedicated entirely to that purpose, that way if someone does not want to get invovled, they can ignore it all together? Just a question, though you've probably heard it before, thanks.]
« Last Edit: June 13, 2005, 02:51:37 PM by greekischristian » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2005, 05:14:26 PM »

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Have you been to a public school in a low income area lately?  I'm guessing not.

I spent nearly all of my youth living in a bad neighborhood in a single-parent home.  My eyes are quite familar with the consequences of drugs and violence.  I've a habit of injecting black humor and sarcasm in my posts, which doesn't always come across plainly.

What you write makes sense, and it's only been recently that I've reconsidered my previously held thoughts on the drug issue, which were in line with yours.  My concerns are what's happening to these mothers of the crack babies in our current system -- they're spending years on end in prisonl, when instead they should be getting help in cleaning up and at home raising their kids.  They come out of that prison environment hardened criminals, and the travails of life that might've led to their initial crack use have only been excacerbated.  Perhaps a few come out cleaned up, but I'm thinking most come out mentally screwed up.  It's a tragedy that children are brought into this life under those circumstances, and it's even more of a tragedy when they end up wards of the state.  It's a tragedy that our inner cities are war zones, and not just our inner cities, but you have entire countries like Columbia that've had their entire social, economic, and political fabric ripped to shreds because of our current policies.

Perhaps legalization might lead to more drug use in the future.  Maybe it's a bad idea.  But you have to try something different than continuing failed stupidity.
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« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2005, 05:26:06 PM »

I spent nearly all of my youth living in a bad neighborhood in a single-parent home. My eyes are quite familar with the consequences of drugs and violence. I've a habit of injecting black humor and sarcasm in my posts, which doesn't always come across plainly.

What you write makes sense, and it's only been recently that I've reconsidered my previously held thoughts on the drug issue, which were in line with yours. My concerns are what's happening to these mothers of the crack babies in our current system -- they're spending years on end in prisonl, when instead they should be getting help in cleaning up and at home raising their kids. They come out of that prison environment hardened criminals, and the travails of life that might've led to their initial crack use have only been excacerbated. Perhaps a few come out cleaned up, but I'm thinking most come out mentally screwed up. It's a tragedy that children are brought into this life under those circumstances, and it's even more of a tragedy when they end up wards of the state. It's a tragedy that our inner cities are war zones, and not just our inner cities, but you have entire countries like Columbia that've had their entire social, economic, and political fabric ripped to shreds because of our current policies.

Perhaps legalization might lead to more drug use in the future. Maybe it's a bad idea. But you have to try something different than continuing failed stupidity.
Strelets I am not in favor of putting drug users in prison unless they have committed other crimes and many of them do. I know one person who after getting his third O.W.I. was sent to a state run rehab program for several months where treatment is given, people have to actively look for a job, and the people are given freedom to even leave the building at certain times during the day after a few weeks in the facility. Programs such as this should exist for drug users.I also think that we should have more active parol officers who would monitor former users during probation as well as having regular psychiatric check ups particularly since many drug users would benefit from some form of medication and therapy. Of course I am just speculating.

I obviously am not very well informed on the complexity of this issue but I do speak from personal experience. I also simply do not like seeing peoples lives fall apart due to drug use and I wish that more people would realize that they are playing Russian roulette with thei lives when they put that straw up their nose or that crack pipe to their lips. I can only imagine what a pharmacy would be like if drugs were legalized.

Quote
It's a tragedy that children are brought into this life under those circumstances, and it's even more of a tragedy when they end up wards of the state.  It's a tragedy that our inner cities are war zones, and not just our inner cities, but you have entire countries like Columbia that've had their entire social, economic, and political fabric ripped to shreds because of our current policies.
I will admit that is the most powerful argument for drug legalization considering the amount of money that pours into the hands of violent criminals from drug addicts.
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« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2005, 08:53:28 AM »

Have you been to a public school in a low income area lately?  I'm guessing not.

Honey, I lived inthe Hood...maybe not the worst one, but two doors down from a crackhouse, pit bull fights,  gunshots on a regular basis, police chases through my BACKYARD and a three hour response time by the cops is bad enough. The neighborhood kids for the most part were rude, mouthy, theiving little hoodlums.  But that is all they knew.  My next door neighbors were great, i will say and there were a few other families on the block, but in general it was hell.  The schools were terrible, not so much because of the teachers, they tried, but the kids..omg, not mine thank God, but you shouldn't have to spend 30 of a 50 minute period getting them to shut up long enough to try and teach them anything.  The schools weren't even accredited, and the state was going to take over last I heard. 

and why do I keep reading here about drug legalization...i dont think it all should be legal, i think that marijuana as a perscription for those who need it for pain should be legal...regulated and legal.  I am not advocating drug use, i have seen what it can do to a person, (my hub used a lot before i ever knew him, as a kid on into his adulthood...its affected his memory, etc etc.).  BUt in certain circumstances, if nature provides a relief, use it.
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