OrthodoxChristianity.net
August 23, 2014, 05:55:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Fr. Seraphim Rose and monasticism  (Read 1519 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
coptic orthodox boy
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 447


« on: June 02, 2005, 11:22:53 PM »

IC XC NIKA
Peace to all,
Okay, how come whenever I read anything on Fr. Seraphim Rose, they state he was a monk who followed, "traditional monasticism."  I don't mean to attach him, but what is this "traditional monasticism" and what is "untraditional monasticism?"
copticorthodoxboy
Logged
yBeayf
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 708

/etc


« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2005, 11:40:15 PM »

Quote
Okay, how come whenever I read anything on Fr. Seraphim Rose, they state he was a monk who followed, "traditional monasticism." I don't mean to attach him, but what is this "traditional monasticism" and what is "untraditional monasticism?"

The three traditional forms of monasticism are coenobitic, which means living communally in a monastery; idiorrhythmic, which means living in a small skete, possibly with a few other monks, and only gathering for services; and eremetic, which means living as a solitary. Seraphim Rose lived in a little wooden cabin in the middle of nowhere with another monk and spent most of his time in contemplation, so he probably fell under the idiorrhythmic model.

As an example of untraditional monasticism, Mother Maria of Paris lived in a city apartment and was very active in the world ministering to the poor and needy. She was still a very holy woman, and recently canonized, but definitely didn't fall under any of the usual monastic models.
Logged
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,786



« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2005, 09:46:01 PM »

Christ is Risen!

Another example of non-traditional monasticism would be St Elizabeth Romanov the New Martyr.  Her Convent was based on a more active model of monastacism found in Byzantium and was not found in Russia or Greece at the time.  She wrote her own Rule that included a scheduled sharing of active and contemplative life for the Nuns of St Mary and Martha Convent. Her convent sponsored a Girls Industrial School, a house for prostitutes seeking to leave that life, a Hospital, and an active home health and feeding program for poor children in Moscow---not the usual Orthodox Monastery for women. Her habit resembled that of a Catholic nun and was gray not black---this was because the nuns of her convent were clothed like the nurses of the time period, who  dressed similarly to Roman Catholic nuns.

In Christ,
Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2005, 10:35:35 PM »

this is fascinating to me.

i suddenly have a ton of questions about monasticism, especially this difference between "traditional" and "untraditional" monasticism, as you have called them...so on a sidebar for this thread, does anyone know of any good books on monasticism? at this point i am most interested in reading about things like the process of becoming a monastic, questions like: does a prospective-monastic get to choose the kind of lifestyle as a monastic he/she will live? if so, to what extent? if anyone knows the answers to these, or has thoughts about them, please share...but if there is a good book out there explaining these kinds of things about Orthodox monasticism, i would be grateful if you would share that too - thanks in advance!

In Christ,
Donna Mary
Logged

hmmmm...
Jennifer
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church in America
Posts: 1,154


« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2005, 11:20:14 PM »

Donna, this isn't exactly what you asked for but I recommend The Mountain of Silence by Kyriacos Markides.  It can be a little 'out there' and it discusses some things that are controversial, e.g. praying people out of hell, but it gives a great 'feel' for Athonite spirituality. 

Logged
Silouan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 818

Bogurodzica dziewica zbaw nas


« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2005, 11:34:30 PM »

Hi - I hope you don't mind if I jump in here!

This is an interesting article to read to get a start on a monastic perspective http://www.holycross-hermitage.com/pages/monasticism_in_21st_century.htm

As mentioned Mountain of Silence is very good and an insight to the great spiritual family of Elder Joseph the Hesychast (and Vatopaidi Monastery where his disciple also called Elder Joseph is the Elder presently). Elder Joseph's letters are collected in a book called "Monastic Wisdom" and are a 'must read.'

As my name suggests, I highly recomend Saint Silouan the Athonite's writtings as well. Elder Sophrony wrote an amazing biography of him that shows the monastic spiritual struggle in its most intense way. It is titled "Saint Silouan the Athonite."

Hope this helps!
Silouan
« Last Edit: June 04, 2005, 01:41:29 AM by Silouan » Logged
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2005, 12:07:41 AM »

thank you all for your suggestions, i've noted them...thank you especially for the article you provided the link to, Silouan - i just read it and it is great Smiley

any other suggestions are welcome too Smiley

In Christ,
Donna Mary
Logged

hmmmm...
Silouan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 818

Bogurodzica dziewica zbaw nas


« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2005, 02:50:34 AM »

I forgot to add what I feel is one of the best introductions for those looking towards teh monastic life the "Epistles" of Elder Paisios of Mount Athos.  I believe they are distributed through St. Herman's Press in English. 

Silouan
Logged
QuoVadis
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 138


« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2005, 02:12:36 AM »

Hi Donna,

I have also been looking into monasticism, and was given a list of some good books, which a nun recommended I read:

* "The Discourses and Sayings" of Abba Dorotheus
* "The Ladder" by St John Climacus - but it's pretty difficult reading.
* "Sayings of the Desert Fathers" by Benedicta Ward, and another by Helen Waddell. 
* "Come Follow Me", an account by an American Orthodox nun of the year that she spent in a Romanian convent. 
* The lives of the Optina Elders published by the St. Herman's Press. 
* "Spiritual Life and How to Become Attuned to it", and a collection of Sermons preached to nuns that are important by St Theophan the Recluse. 
* "The Arena" by St. Ignaty Brianchaninov

Amongst others.  The books I have read in regards to monasticism:

* Abbess Thaisia of Leushino - Autobiography
* Letters to a Beginner - by Abbess Thaisia
* A Collection of Letters to Nuns - By St. Anatoly of Optina
* Kindling The Diving Spark - by St Theophan the Recluse
* Anchored in God
* Dorotheos of Gaza: Discourses and Sayings (I've only read a couple of chapters of this, as I like to "digest")
* The Ladder - by St John of Climacus (I've only read a little of this too.)

Should be enough here for you to "digest".  Happy reading!
Logged

"Without sorrows there is no salvation. On the other hand, the Kingdom of God awaits those who have patiently endured. And all the glory of the world is nothing in comparison." - St Seraphim of Sarov
Tags: Fr. Seraphim Rose Monasticism Monastery 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.05 seconds with 35 queries.