Author Topic: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish  (Read 5402 times)

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Offline wgw

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Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« on: January 17, 2015, 07:41:34 AM »
Hey all,

I am looking for the following material, which is not available on any site I can find (including Syriac Orthodox Resources and the liturgics page on the website of the Malankara Independent Syrian Church:

- Propers for the variable parts of liturgy and morning prayer.
- Propers for special services like the Good Friday service and Saturday night Paschal liturgy.
- The longer form of the Divine Office than the abbreviated one on SOR and the English translation of the Canonical Prayerbook by the former priest at St. Ephraims; I am told a longer version exists and is used in the monasteries.
- The complete lectionary (I have an incomplete lectionary for Sunday's only in the form of my 2014 and 2015 liturgical calendars for the Western Archdiocese; the Malankara Syriac Orthodox Church posts a lectionary on their site but the lessons for the same liturgical day seem completely different, making me think this is a regional variation; I am interested in whatever lectionaries are used by the Suryanis in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palesrine, Turkey and the diaspora).
- A complete catalog of all 86 Anaphorae rumored to exist in English, as opposed to the 17 or so that have been translated, which I have.
- Information on any regional variations on the liturgical texts themselves within the Middle East.
- A complete index or guide to the liturgical books used by the Syriac Orthodox Church vs. what is based on tradition.
- Information on how the Old Testament is used liturgically, if at all.

I do have a Maronite Missal, and their Lenten celebration appears to follow the same structure as the Syriac one, but their Anaphora are sufficiently changed so as to make it untrustworthy for so one in search of authenticity.  For that matter, are the usages in the texts offered by the Malankara Independent Syrian Church compatible with the Syriac Orthodox rites?

Also, I read online of a collection of Husoye prayers by a former patriarch.  Is that available in English and if so, worth buying?  Also, is Sebastien Brock's set of translations of the Anaphora worth buying given its rather high price and the free access that exists to Syriac Orthodox Resource?   I am still reeling from the cost of a Festal menaion, Pentecostarion and a Triodion which I just purchased together with the Nassar Five Pounder to better understand the Byzantine Rite.

Thank you in advance for any answers.
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline sheenj

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2015, 12:10:11 PM »
Hey all,

I am looking for the following material, which is not available on any site I can find (including Syriac Orthodox Resources and the liturgics page on the website of the Malankara Independent Syrian Church:

- Propers for the variable parts of liturgy and morning prayer.
- Propers for special services like the Good Friday service and Saturday night Paschal liturgy.
- The longer form of the Divine Office than the abbreviated one on SOR and the English translation of the Canonical Prayerbook by the former priest at St. Ephraims; I am told a longer version exists and is used in the monasteries.
- The complete lectionary (I have an incomplete lectionary for Sunday's only in the form of my 2014 and 2015 liturgical calendars for the Western Archdiocese; the Malankara Syriac Orthodox Church posts a lectionary on their site but the lessons for the same liturgical day seem completely different, making me think this is a regional variation; I am interested in whatever lectionaries are used by the Suryanis in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palesrine, Turkey and the diaspora).
- A complete catalog of all 86 Anaphorae rumored to exist in English, as opposed to the 17 or so that have been translated, which I have.
- Information on any regional variations on the liturgical texts themselves within the Middle East.
- A complete index or guide to the liturgical books used by the Syriac Orthodox Church vs. what is based on tradition.
- Information on how the Old Testament is used liturgically, if at all.

I do have a Maronite Missal, and their Lenten celebration appears to follow the same structure as the Syriac one, but their Anaphora are sufficiently changed so as to make it untrustworthy for so one in search of authenticity.  For that matter, are the usages in the texts offered by the Malankara Independent Syrian Church compatible with the Syriac Orthodox rites?

Also, I read online of a collection of Husoye prayers by a former patriarch.  Is that available in English and if so, worth buying?  Also, is Sebastien Brock's set of translations of the Anaphora worth buying given its rather high price and the free access that exists to Syriac Orthodox Resource?   I am still reeling from the cost of a Festal menaion, Pentecostarion and a Triodion which I just purchased together with the Nassar Five Pounder to better understand the Byzantine Rite.

Thank you in advance for any answers.

The South-West Diocese of the Indian Orthodox Church has some of the resources you're looking for in English, particularly the Offices for Good Friday and other feasts and sacraments. It also has the Malayalam version of the Divine Office for each day of the week as well as the complete hours for Easter, including the midnight service, but I don't know if you can read the language. You can poke around to see if there's anything else you need on there.

http://ds-wa.org/table/festal-breviary/
http://ds-wa.org/table/sacramental-offices/
http://ds-wa.org/malayalam-resources.html

Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2015, 01:52:47 PM »
Hi wgw,

Hey all,

I am looking for the following material, which is not available on any site I can find (including Syriac Orthodox Resources and the liturgics page on the website of the Malankara Independent Syrian Church:

SOR is preferable to MISC.  I've looked at some of their stuff in the past and am not sure if it reflects their actual practice or is rather some sort of academic reconstruction.  

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- Propers for the variable parts of liturgy and morning prayer.

There aren't really any variable parts of the Liturgy that aren't already contained in the priest's service book for the Liturgy.  So, for example, if you consult the Book of Anaphoras which is online in English at SOR (I presume you are familiar with it), the Proemion and Sedro read after the Gospel in the Liturgy of the Catechumens can be any one set out of the several in the book, but that's it.  There are rubrics found in other editions which clarify that only these may be used for the Liturgy (e.g., you can't take one from Vespers and plug it in, it must be the "liturgical" unit).  

As for the Sunday and festal offices, these only exist in a complete form in Syriac.  There are parts available in other languages, but it's only a fraction: Malayalam is your best bet, but some things exist in English.  Very little of this is on the internet.  

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- Propers for special services like the Good Friday service and Saturday night Paschal liturgy.

See sheenj's post.  

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- The longer form of the Divine Office than the abbreviated one on SOR and the English translation of the Canonical Prayerbook by the former priest at St. Ephraims; I am told a longer version exists and is used in the monasteries.

The shorter forms you are familiar with are abbreviated forms which are used by many laypeople.  The "longer" form of the Office exists in two major parts, which I will call "weekly" and "seasonal".  The "weekly" Office (Monday through Saturday) doesn't change and so is called "Common" (Sh'himo).  The only language in which I've seen it online in a reasonably complete form is Syriac.  The "seasonal" Office is that of Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  As I said above, that exists in a complete form only in Syriac.  There are a few different recensions, but the Syriac Studies Reference Library of BYU and CUA has made the Mosul Fanqitho available online, which you may find useful.  

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- The complete lectionary (I have an incomplete lectionary for Sunday's only in the form of my 2014 and 2015 liturgical calendars for the Western Archdiocese; the Malankara Syriac Orthodox Church posts a lectionary on their site but the lessons for the same liturgical day seem completely different, making me think this is a regional variation; I am interested in whatever lectionaries are used by the Suryanis in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palesrine, Turkey and the diaspora).

If, by "complete", you mean a lectionary with readings for each of the 365 days of the year, I don't think you'll find one.  The lectionaries (there are regional variants) are basically for Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  For your purposes, your liturgical calendar should be sufficient.    

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- A complete catalog of all 86 Anaphorae rumored to exist in English, as opposed to the 17 or so that have been translated, which I have.

A complete list of these can be found in The Scattered Pearls by Patriarch Ephrem I.  But I don't think there's one book or website that contains the full texts of all the anaphorae in Syriac, let alone any other language.  

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- Information on any regional variations on the liturgical texts themselves within the Middle East.

Your question is too broad for me to address.  Do you have any specific questions?  

You may find some helpful information in Pat. Ephrem's book.
  
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- A complete index or guide to the liturgical books used by the Syriac Orthodox Church vs. what is based on tradition.

I'm not sure I understand this.

Quote
- Information on how the Old Testament is used liturgically, if at all.

Again, I think this is too broad for me to answer at the moment.  Any day for which the Lectionary appoints readings always includes at least two or three readings from the OT, which are read at the end of Matins and before the Liturgy or, on aliturgical days, shortly before the conclusion of Matins.  

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I do have a Maronite Missal, and their Lenten celebration appears to follow the same structure as the Syriac one, but their Anaphora are sufficiently changed so as to make it untrustworthy for so one in search of authenticity.  For that matter, are the usages in the texts offered by the Malankara Independent Syrian Church compatible with the Syriac Orthodox rites?

I haven't studied Maronite texts in depth, so I can't say for sure how they compare.  

I would need to review the MISC texts to be sure, but the SOR texts reflect present day standard practice, at least in terms of the Divine Liturgy.

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Also, I read online of a collection of Husoye prayers by a former patriarch.  Is that available in English and if so, worth buying?  

I'm not familiar with this collection.  Where may I read it?  

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Also, is Sebastien Brock's set of translations of the Anaphora worth buying given its rather high price and the free access that exists to Syriac Orthodox Resource?   I am still reeling from the cost of a Festal menaion, Pentecostarion and a Triodion which I just purchased together with the Nassar Five Pounder to better understand the Byzantine Rite.

I didn't know that Dr Brock put out his own liturgical translations.  Where may I find them?  
« Last Edit: January 17, 2015, 02:12:39 PM by Mor Ephrem »
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Offline surajiype

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2015, 12:46:45 AM »
Why not use the Awsar Slo'wotho of Bede Griffith(Sh'himo). I think it is available online (bit heftily priced though).

It may not be very useful to pray but definately for study & comparison purposes it is handy.

Offline wgw

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2015, 06:32:58 PM »
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There aren't really any variable parts of the Liturgy that aren't already contained in the priest's service book for the Liturgy.  So, for example, if you consult the Book of Anaphoras which is online in English at SOR (I presume you are familiar with it), the Proemion and Sedro read after the Gospel in the Liturgy of the Catechumens can be any one set out of the several in the book, but that's it.  There are rubrics found in other editions which clarify that only these may be used for the Liturgy (e.g., you can't take one from Vespers and plug it in, it must be the "liturgical" unit). 

On the Syriac Orthodox Resources website there are a total of 11 Husoye, including the proper for Sundays in the Public Celebration page, and on the page Supplications a further ten, including the proper for weekdays, and for various holy days.  Are you saying this is the extent of variability in the Holy Qurbana?   Aren't there some variable hymns for special occasions?  Also, what about details such as on Pentecost, where the Priest douses (in the case of my church, "attacks" might be an apt description  ;D) the congregation with holy water using palm fronds?  Is there nothing like the General Menaion of the Orthodox Church that contains all of these customs in one place?

Given that the Maronite Rite is a simplification and Latinization of the Syriac Rite, and they were able to produce a 5 volume missal with fairly robust propers for different services throughout the year, I would be surprised if in comparison the Divine Liturgy of the Syriac Orthodox Church is static, disappointed even.  I would be inclined to think we had lost something along the way, perhaps due to the genocide of 1915.

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The shorter forms you are familiar with are abbreviated forms which are used by many laypeople.  The "longer" form of the Office exists in two major parts, which I will call "weekly" and "seasonal".  The "weekly" Office (Monday through Saturday) doesn't change and so is called "Common" (Sh'himo).  The only language in which I've seen it online in a reasonably complete form is Syriac.  The "seasonal" Office is that of Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  As I said above, that exists in a complete form only in Syriac.  There are a few different recensions, but the Syriac Studies Reference Library of BYU and CUA has made the Mosul Fanqitho available online, which you may find useful. 

Is that just available in a Latin translation?  I was having some trouble getting the PDF to load on my iPad, but what came through looked Latin.

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If, by "complete", you mean a lectionary with readings for each of the 365 days of the year, I don't think you'll find one.  The lectionaries (there are regional variants) are basically for Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  For your purposes, your liturgical calendar should be sufficient. 

So is there not a specific weekday lectionary, for example, for use with the monastic divine office?  Also, I'm under the impression that the rubrics of the Syriac Orthodox Church ordinarily proscribe serving the Qurbono Qadisho on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, unless a feast happens to fall on those days.   This implies that there should at least be lections for Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays?

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I didn't know that Dr Brock put out his own liturgical translations.  Where may I find them? 

I made an error, the collection in question was edited by Abraham Konat and is available at a rather high price from Gorgias Press.  Are you familiar with it, and if so, is it substantially the same as the anaphoras on Syriac Orthodox Resources?   I am looking for a better quality translation where possible as alas the English skills of the translators on SOR are in some cases, while very readable, less poetic than one might prefer.  This does not prevent the beauty of texts like the hymn Haw Nurone from shining through.

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I'm not familiar with this collection.  Where may I read it? 

I'm not sure precisely, it is described on this article, which I found linked to from another thread on the subject of Husoyos on this forum, to which you contributed: http://www.syriacstudies.com/AFSS/Syriac_Articles_in_English/Entries/2008/3/17_HUSOYOS_(PROPITIATORY_PRAYERS)_FOR_SUNDAYS,_FEASTS,_LENT_AND_PASSION_WEEK,_AND_OTHER_OCCASIONS_-_Mor_Ignatius_Aphram_Barsoum.html

Several manuscripts are mentioned, the oldest being a Priest's Service Book, Paris MS 70, the next being another of the same, at St. Mark's Monastery, Jerusalem MS 55, then Paris MS 167, a volume of Husoye in the handwriting of Patriarch Michael the Great, and finally, an unnamed manuscript at the Monastery of the Cross near Tur Abdin, which contains over 170 Husoye.  I don't know where these can be obtained; I wish I knew.  Why does everything in the realm of Syriac Studies have to be so elusive?
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline wgw

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2015, 06:41:54 PM »
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- Information on any regional variations on the liturgical texts themselves within the Middle East.

Your question is too broad for me to address.  Do you have any specific questions? 

I'd be very interested if you could describe any interesting regional variations you are aware of.  For example, are some of the Anaphoras used or not used in some places?   Are there significant regional variations in the Prothesis or the Public Celebration (Liturgy of the Catechumens and Liturgy of the Faithful)?  You mentioned regional variations in the lectionary; do you know of any particularly interesting examples of these?  Any particularly interesting or noteworthy regional variations in hymnody?  I'd also be interested to know in what areas Syriac is more likely to be used throughout the service, i.e. the population still understand it in the vernacular, if any at all, and what specific aspects of the rich cultural heritage are most endangered by the barbarians from ISIL.

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- A complete index or guide to the liturgical books used by the Syriac Orthodox Church vs. what is based on tradition.

I'm not sure I understand this.

I've read that there are substantial portions of the Syriac liturgical tradition, including many aspects of the hymnody, that are known largely by oral tradition.  Now using the Byzantine Rite as a point of comparision, are there specific aspects that are, for example, recorded in the Byzantine Rite, but left to oral tradition in the Syriac Rite?  For example, is there a Syriac equivalent of the Typikon, or is this based on oral tradition?   

For that matter, what are the principle service books of the Syriac Orthodox Church, and what do they cover?  And what, if anything, does a priest ,or a choir director, in the middle East, the Diaspora, or India, rely on unwritten oral tradition for?

Lastly, if I might venture one further question, to what extent is the Old Testament read in the Syriac Orthodox Church?  I recall reading from one rather unreliable source that it was generally to be read at Matins before the Divine Liturgy.
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline Tony

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2015, 08:00:43 PM »
Why not use the Awsar Slo'wotho of Bede Griffith(Sh'himo). I think it is available online (bit heftily priced though).

It may not be very useful to pray but definately for study & comparison purposes it is handy.

I was thinking of purchasing this with the intention of using it for prayer. What is the reason it wouldn't be useful to pray with? Thank you.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2015, 08:01:08 PM by Tony »

Offline wgw

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2015, 09:03:04 PM »
Why not use the Awsar Slo'wotho of Bede Griffith(Sh'himo). I think it is available online (bit heftily priced though).

It may not be very useful to pray but definately for study & comparison purposes it is handy.

I was thinking of purchasing this with the intention of using it for prayer. What is the reason it wouldn't be useful to pray with? Thank you.

Is that text available in English?
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline Tony

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2015, 09:37:10 PM »
Why not use the Awsar Slo'wotho of Bede Griffith(Sh'himo). I think it is available online (bit heftily priced though).

It may not be very useful to pray but definately for study & comparison purposes it is handy.

I was thinking of purchasing this with the intention of using it for prayer. What is the reason it wouldn't be useful to pray with? Thank you.

Is that text available in English?

Here it is from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Common-Prayer-shhimo-Syrian-Church/dp/1593330332/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1421717774&sr=1-1&keywords=bede+griffiths+syriac

Offline wgw

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2015, 11:18:04 PM »
That doesn't contain the abbreviated monastic offices or otherwise duplicate the material found on Ayriac Orthodox Resources?
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2015, 01:09:54 AM »
Hi wgw,

I will comment on your posts, but before that, I wanted to clarify: are you asking about English language resources that are available online or resources that are available in any form?  I thought you had the former in mind, but you may correct me and perhaps I can be of more help.   

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There aren't really any variable parts of the Liturgy that aren't already contained in the priest's service book for the Liturgy.  So, for example, if you consult the Book of Anaphoras which is online in English at SOR (I presume you are familiar with it), the Proemion and Sedro read after the Gospel in the Liturgy of the Catechumens can be any one set out of the several in the book, but that's it.  There are rubrics found in other editions which clarify that only these may be used for the Liturgy (e.g., you can't take one from Vespers and plug it in, it must be the "liturgical" unit). 

On the Syriac Orthodox Resources website there are a total of 11 Husoye, including the proper for Sundays in the Public Celebration page, and on the page Supplications a further ten, including the proper for weekdays, and for various holy days.  Are you saying this is the extent of variability in the Holy Qurbana?   

When speaking strictly about the order of the Holy Qurbono, yes.  The priest is free to choose any one of those Husoye for the Liturgy, but he couldn't decide, for example, that he liked the one from Vespers of Christmas so much that he was going to use that instead.  That's what I meant by "the 'liturgical' unit"--the one(s) which can be used in the Divine Liturgy.   

Other than that, the only other variation in the texts of the Qurbono is in the choice of anaphora which, on major feasts and other prescribed occasions, is that of St James.  There are special prayers before the kiss of peace for Christmas and Holy Saturday (one each) and a Husoyo for Holy Thursday, but that's about it.  If there's anything else out there, I'm not familiar with it (I'm speaking from experience with the Indian tradition). 

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Aren't there some variable hymns for special occasions? 


Yes, but they are not strictly speaking a part of the order of the Liturgy.  The ordo prescribes that a hymn be sung after the Gospel, during the Fraction, and before the Dismissal, but leaves the choice up to the community (the ordo has a few generic options which can always be chosen, but allows for selections from other sources). 

For example, on the feast of the Nativity, a number of different sources prescribe the hymn "Enono lahmo d'haye" to be sung after the Gospel.  In India, this is also one of the "generic" options for that particular moment.  So it appears in an appendix in the deacon's service book (not the priest's) as the hymn for Christmas, but could be sung on the feast of Sts Peter and Paul to substitute for that day's prescribed hymn (if, for example, it is unfamiliar).  But even if you are able to sing "Enono lahmo d'haye" on Christmas, you could substitute "Mshiho ethiled" (a hymn from the Vespers of Christmas) and it would be just fine.  *Something* needs to be sung: that much is a part of the order.  But *what* to sing is left to the discretion of the community, though most would naturally go with the prescribed option.  They are all taken from the Office anyway.   

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Also, what about details such as on Pentecost, where the Priest douses (in the case of my church, "attacks" might be an apt description  ;D) the congregation with holy water using palm fronds?  Is there nothing like the General Menaion of the Orthodox Church that contains all of these customs in one place?

Those services, IIRC, are not contained in the Fanqitho (the equivalent set of books to the Menaia of the Eastern Orthodox Church), but are in a separate book of festal rites called Madedono.   

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Given that the Maronite Rite is a simplification and Latinization of the Syriac Rite, and they were able to produce a 5 volume missal with fairly robust propers for different services throughout the year, I would be surprised if in comparison the Divine Liturgy of the Syriac Orthodox Church is static, disappointed even.  I would be inclined to think we had lost something along the way, perhaps due to the genocide of 1915.

Not having studied the Maronite rite, I hesitate to comment, but I'm going to take a guess.  If we are talking specifically about the order of the Qurbono, and the Maronites have a five volume missal with propers for the Qurbono, I suspect it is a Latin influence.  In just about every Orthodox tradition, Oriental or Eastern, the Eucharistic Liturgy is probably the most invariable service there is.  The Syriac tradition probably has the most variation of them all, but in all cases, the variation is intra-liturgical, having to do with various options for the service itself but with no significant connection to the feast or season.  That's a fairly consistent pattern and one that has good reasons behind it.

I would be surprised to learn that we had lost that much with the genocide, but certainly some things were lost.  But the genocide didn't affect India, and while different holy fathers from the Syriac Church visited India and "rediscovered" things which were lost to them but preserved among us, Maronite style propers for the Qurbono do not seem to have been among them.   

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The shorter forms you are familiar with are abbreviated forms which are used by many laypeople.  The "longer" form of the Office exists in two major parts, which I will call "weekly" and "seasonal".  The "weekly" Office (Monday through Saturday) doesn't change and so is called "Common" (Sh'himo).  The only language in which I've seen it online in a reasonably complete form is Syriac.  The "seasonal" Office is that of Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  As I said above, that exists in a complete form only in Syriac.  There are a few different recensions, but the Syriac Studies Reference Library of BYU and CUA has made the Mosul Fanqitho available online, which you may find useful. 

Is that just available in a Latin translation?  I was having some trouble getting the PDF to load on my iPad, but what came through looked Latin.

To tell you the truth, I don't know.  I think what I linked to is Syriac and not a bilingual Syriac-Latin edition, even if it has some Latin in the front material.  If those volumes exist in a Latin only edition, I have not heard of it. 

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If, by "complete", you mean a lectionary with readings for each of the 365 days of the year, I don't think you'll find one.  The lectionaries (there are regional variants) are basically for Sundays, feasts, and fasts.  For your purposes, your liturgical calendar should be sufficient. 

So is there not a specific weekday lectionary, for example, for use with the monastic divine office?

IIRC, each monastery had its own practice in this regard or followed the practice of one of the major monasteries.  You would have to check with a specific monastery to see what they do.  But there is no "weekday lectionary" which the Holy Synod of Antioch (or India, for that matter) has approved for use in all churches and monasteries.  There is the lectionary for Sundays, feasts, and fasts. 

If, for example, my parish wanted to have a Liturgy tomorrow morning, there are no assigned readings.  Since there must be readings, these are obtained in one of a handful of ways, but "consulting the weekday lectionary" is not one of them.  :P

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Also, I'm under the impression that the rubrics of the Syriac Orthodox Church ordinarily proscribe serving the Qurbono Qadisho on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, unless a feast happens to fall on those days.   This implies that there should at least be lections for Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays?

That's news to me, and I would like confirmation of it.  AFAIK, there is no prohibition on serving the Liturgy on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays.  If a parish has weekday services, it is most common to have the Liturgy on Wednesdays or Fridays, but not because they are the only days you can serve the Liturgy.  And in some places in India, the practice is actually the opposite of what you said: they will serve the Liturgy on any day but Wednesday and Friday. 

My guess is that these practices are both due to fasting.  For the Syrians, a day on which there is fasting is probably considered especially appropriate for receiving Communion, and so is a good day for the Liturgy.  Indians are likely to consider a Liturgy on Wednesday or Friday to be incompatible with the total fasting until 6pm or 3pm that is required for those days, and so would omit it or perhaps celebrate it later in the day.  That said, there are places in India where the Liturgy is served daily.  I would be surprised if there was a hard and fast rule other than that there is no Liturgy during the weekdays of Great Lent, the fast of the Ninevites, and Holy Week (other than Thursday and Saturday).   

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I didn't know that Dr Brock put out his own liturgical translations.  Where may I find them? 

I made an error, the collection in question was edited by Abraham Konat and is available at a rather high price from Gorgias Press. 

LOL.  What isn't available at a rather high price there? 

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Are you familiar with it, and if so, is it substantially the same as the anaphoras on Syriac Orthodox Resources?   I am looking for a better quality translation where possible as alas the English skills of the translators on SOR are in some cases, while very readable, less poetic than one might prefer.  This does not prevent the beauty of texts like the hymn Haw Nurone from shining through.

I'm not familiar with what Gorgias Press is offering, but if it is what I think it is, I have it and it would be a sin to pay that much for it. 

Do you have a direct link? 

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I'm not familiar with this collection.  Where may I read it? 

I'm not sure precisely, it is described on this article, which I found linked to from another thread on the subject of Husoyos on this forum, to which you contributed: http://www.syriacstudies.com/AFSS/Syriac_Articles_in_English/Entries/2008/3/17_HUSOYOS_(PROPITIATORY_PRAYERS)_FOR_SUNDAYS,_FEASTS,_LENT_AND_PASSION_WEEK,_AND_OTHER_OCCASIONS_-_Mor_Ignatius_Aphram_Barsoum.html

Several manuscripts are mentioned, the oldest being a Priest's Service Book, Paris MS 70, the next being another of the same, at St. Mark's Monastery, Jerusalem MS 55, then Paris MS 167, a volume of Husoye in the handwriting of Patriarch Michael the Great, and finally, an unnamed manuscript at the Monastery of the Cross near Tur Abdin, which contains over 170 Husoye.  I don't know where these can be obtained; I wish I knew.  Why does everything in the realm of Syriac Studies have to be so elusive?


Thanks for the link.  I need to read it when I'm not so tired.  :P
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The erection of one’s rod counts as a form of glory (Theophylaktos of Ohrid, A Defense of Eunuchs, p. 329).

Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2015, 01:14:40 AM »
Why not use the Awsar Slo'wotho of Bede Griffith(Sh'himo). I think it is available online (bit heftily priced though).

It may not be very useful to pray but definately for study & comparison purposes it is handy.

I was thinking of purchasing this with the intention of using it for prayer. What is the reason it wouldn't be useful to pray with? Thank you.

I suspect Suraj meant that, unless you know Syriac and how to chant, it is not easy to use this volume to perform the services contained in it as intended.  But if you're not singing anything, it is easy enough to read the service from this book.  That's not how you would do the service in a public setting at church, but whatever.  :)
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The erection of one’s rod counts as a form of glory (Theophylaktos of Ohrid, A Defense of Eunuchs, p. 329).

Offline wgw

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2015, 02:10:23 AM »
Before I read and respond in detail to your excellent replies Mor Ephrem, I want to say I'm looking for both.  Obviously something freely downloadable over the Internet is preferable to something that costs $100 and takes a few weeks to arrive (the Scattered Pearls, which I just ordered with the other suggested Prayerbook along with some other material on Amazon), but where something only exists in the form of a rare and expensive book, as long as it's in English and worth the cost, I'll buy it.
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Offline Samn!

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2015, 06:37:51 AM »
A lot of the liturgical questions here, in terms of current practice and historical usage can be found in Baby Varghese's book West Syrian Liturgical Theology, published by Ashgate in 2004. It's a little hard to find, though, but could probably be inter-library loaned.

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2015, 09:58:29 PM »
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Yes, but they are not strictly speaking a part of the order of the Liturgy.  The ordo prescribes that a hymn be sung after the Gospel, during the Fraction, and before the Dismissal, but leaves the choice up to the community (the ordo has a few generic options which can always be chosen, but allows for selections from other sources). 

For example, on the feast of the Nativity, a number of different sources prescribe the hymn "Enono lahmo d'haye" to be sung after the Gospel.  In India, this is also one of the "generic" options for that particular moment.  So it appears in an appendix in the deacon's service book (not the priest's) as the hymn for Christmas, but could be sung on the feast of Sts Peter and Paul to substitute for that day's prescribed hymn (if, for example, it is unfamiliar).  But even if you are able to sing "Enono lahmo d'haye" on Christmas, you could substitute "Mshiho ethiled" (a hymn from the Vespers of Christmas) and it would be just fine.  *Something* needs to be sung: that much is a part of the order.  But *what* to sing is left to the discretion of the community, though most would naturally go with the prescribed option.  They are all taken from the Office anyway.   

Mor, you've just hit the proverbial nail on the head, specifically the nail I required.

That is to say, that's the unwritten tradition that I feel is so critically endangered.  So let's take a step back.  In the Byzantine Rite, the Typikon, the Menaion, the Triodion, Pentecostarion and Octoechos together with the Horologion and the Euchologion et cetera, taken as a whole, specify with some degree of precision which hymns are to be sung at what services.  There is some leeway here and there, and local traditions do vary, especially with regards to the music itself, as opposed to the lyrics, and also with regards to what parts of the service are omitted, as alas very few people celebrate the services in full, but in general, the degree of conformity throughout the Byzantine Rite is remarkable. 

In like manner, the old Tridentine Latin Rite specifies certain hymns for the liturgy and, both before and after the reforms of Pius X, the Breviary specifies various hymns for the divine office.  There exists some flexibility however; especially before Pius X, for example, the option existed to serve various shorter votive offices instead of some of the longer regular offices of the breviary (as the number of psalms varied from office to office, making some offices somewhat dreaded by those who viewed singing them as a chore; Pius X attacked this problem by equalizing the number of psalms, and he also attacked the encroachment of ordinary Sundays by feast days throughout the year by privileging ordinary Sundays to a certain extent, so that the wearing of green vestments no longer became a rarity in the Roman church).

Now, in contrast, the Syriac Rite allows a great deal of freedom.  You can pick the Anaphora, except when St. James is required, you can pick the hymns from a list of certain acceptable hymns for an occasion, and so on.  The proper parts you are obliged to use are simply the Husoyo proper to the liturgy, for example.  And there are also regional customs, such as serving the liturgy on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, not serving the liturgy on Wednesday and Friday, serving it daily, and serving it every day except Wednesday and Friday based on the precedent of not serving the liturgy on fasting days set (admittedly rather weekly) by the special case of the Rogation of the Ninevites.

So that takes us to what is critically endangered: the unique tradition of each church.   In a sense, it would seem to me that each parish church, or perhaps in some cases each diocese, has its own Typikon, so to speak, in that it has its own rule about what anaphoras it uses, and on what occasions (other than where St. James is required), what variable hymns it sings on what days, and so on.  And it seems to me that these traditions in Iraq, Syria and even Turkey, Lebanon, Bethlehem and Jerusalem, are critically endangered (I know a lovely Syriac Orthodox lady from the dwindling Bethlehem community surrounding St. Marys nad the Church of the Nativity, the siege of which caused me to decide to become Syriac Orthodox when I was 15 [I was Methodist at the time] named Gita). 

So this it seems to me is what's endangered.  I would very much like to send out a survey in English, Syriac, Arabic and Malayalam, to each Syriac Orthodox diocese and parish in the Middle East and India, asking them to describe in detail the "optional" aspects of the services that they traditionally use, in terms of choice of anaphora on non-St. James days, choices of hymns, the color of the beautiful Pulickal Brothers copes they wear, if they put any thought into it, et cetera.   Alas the only trouble is I only speak English.  But do you get what I'm trying to do?   I want to preserve a record of what the traditions are at each Syriac parish in the middle East, including those which are temporarily closed in Mosul, before these traditions are forgotten.   This is the actual information I was trying to get at, that was at the very root of this thread, although the other resources have been profoundly helpful, and I have been able to order some English language books and get additional information thanks to your responses and those of others.

It's my opinion though this information is extremely valuable.  Now I hope someone in the Syriac Orthodox Church thinks likewise and is already collecting it, but if not, I feel obliged to attempt to collect some of it on my own.  Out of curiosity, in the middle East, how many Syriac priests likely speak English, if anyone dares venture a guess?  And would I be correct in assuming they all speak Arabic?

Also, Mor, regarding choices of hymns, anaphoras, and so on, how much of this is on a parish vs. archdiocesan level?   In the Western US diocese for example, there are only two anaphoras in use, St. James and Mar Bar Salibi, the latter because its the shortest.  I spoke to a hieromonk at a parish on the East Coast, in New Jersey, whose contact details I then lost, who said his parish uses four anaphoras, the four they use happen to be the only four where he could find translations in English, Arabic and Syriac.  Would anyone happen to know which ones those are?   He also suggested I call St. Mark's Monastery in Jerusalem and speak to a particular monk, who is supposed to be a guru of Anaphorae; I still have that guy's contact info at least.

Also Mor I don't want to appear too disinterested in the Syriac traditions in India, which are not entirely safe due to occasional sectarian unpleasantness in Kerala.  I am sort of proceeding in my efforts in Triage mode, starting with the most critically endangered areas first.  I positively love the Nasranis and once drew on my iPad a humble attempt at an icon of Mar Ahatulla, which perhaps I should make my avatar on OC.net.

By the way, as a footnote, to all who read this thread and assume I'm Syriac Orthodox, I will not deny it, but will not confirm it either, other than to say I have been a member of the Syriac Orthodox Church and was received in that church first, and later have at different times been members of different churches, Chalcedonian and Oriental Orthodox.  The jurisdiction I'm a member of is strictly my business, and just a few privileged members of OC.Net including the priest who approved my application know it. Having been at different times for different reasons, never ideological but generally geographical, been members of both Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, and I love both with a searing intensity, pray for their reunion, and have no wish to discuss any of the controversial or unpleasant details; in fact I love the pan-Orthodox nature of this site, because I would consider myself in a sense pan-Orthodox.  I love all Orthodox Christians; I pray for all Christians that they may see the light of the Orthodox faith, which alone has preserved the Apostolic faith in its fullness.  So please let us worship the Lord in harmony and brotherhood.
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline surajiype

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2015, 08:08:38 AM »

[/quote]

I suspect Suraj meant that, unless you know Syriac and how to chant, it is not easy to use this volume to perform the services contained in it as intended.  But if you're not singing anything, it is easy enough to read the service from this book.  That's not how you would do the service in a public setting at church, but whatever.  :)
[/quote]

Precisely, I tried to use the book for prayer but thats now how we (the Orthodox of India) do it as a worshiping community; so found it to be disconnecting from the received tradition. Instead I used Fr Griffiths book for reflection and contemplation after completing canonical hours admittedly in the reduced form which is popular among the Indian laity.


Offline CharalambisMakarios

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2015, 12:38:19 AM »
I can recommend the Awsar Slawot'o. It's an excellent resource

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2015, 02:03:09 AM »
Well my Syrian Book of Common Pryaer arrived and it looks to be an excellent resource although the translation quality is somewhat poor and a lexicon mapping the Syriac names of the services to their English ones, hopefully provided by a reader of this thread, would be of benefit.
Axios and many years to you, Fr. Trenham!

Offline Alpha60

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2017, 07:19:44 AM »
Question: Is The Scattered Pearls available in English?   I would very much like to have a complete list of all our anaphoras.
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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2017, 11:11:41 AM »
Mighty Mor gave me Daily Prayers from the Language of Jesus by Fr. Dale Johnson when I was in NY.  :angel:  It's a compilation of daily prayers from the Shimo, day by day of the week.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 11:12:39 AM by RaphaCam »
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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2017, 12:04:03 PM »
Mighty Mor gave me Daily Prayers from the Language of Jesus by Fr. Dale Johnson when I was in NY.  :angel:  It's a compilation of daily prayers from the Shimo, day by day of the week.

How nice of him!

You know I have a print copy of the Shimo, but recently I found the entire Engish text online. 
"It is logical that the actions of the human race over time will lead to its destruction.  I, Alpha 60, am merely the agent of this destruction."

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This signature is not intended to offend any user, nor the relatives of Discovery 1 deputy commander Dr. Frank Poole,  and crew members Dr. Victor Kaminsky, Dr. Jack Kimball, and Dr. Charles Hunter.

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Re: Syriac Orthodox Liturgical Texts in Emglish
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2017, 11:58:01 PM »
Quote from: Alpha60 link=topic=63202.msg1490253#msg1490253 date=1508601843
You know I have a print copy of the Shimo, but recently I found the [i
entire[/i] Engish text online.
Nice, where?
"May the Lord our God remember in His kingdom all Holy Catholic Apostolic Church, which heralds the Word of Truth and fearlessly offers and distributes the Holy Oblation despite human deficiencies and persecutions moved by the powers of this world, in all time and unto the ages of ages."

Check my blog "Em Espírito e em Verdade" (in Portuguese)