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Author Topic: Should Protestants Be Rebaptized???  (Read 7141 times) Average Rating: 0
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rakovsky
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« Reply #45 on: November 04, 2012, 11:30:13 AM »

I guess another important difference between what Christ said and what Quakers do is that Quakers throw out the baptism with the baptism water so to speak. That is, Baptism is typically performed with outward rituals, which they by nature disagree with, so they don't perform baptism at all, limiting themselves to relying on new Christians receiving it without older Christians praying for them to receive it. This is possible since prophets received the spirit in ancient times without others necessarily asking them to receive it.
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Ashman618
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« Reply #46 on: November 04, 2012, 12:51:52 PM »

In acts when the Gentiles had already received the Spirit, Peter said "for what reason should these be denied water" so to him water is necessary but I think now in our modern sophisticated times we think we know better then the apostles on most things, it's hard for me to form an opinion on this one but if God willing I get received into the Orhodox church and the priest says I need to be baptized I'm all over it Infact I would prefer it.
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PeterTheAleut
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« Reply #47 on: November 04, 2012, 05:56:59 PM »

Having been a regular worshiper at a Quaker church for a few years while in college, I would say that the Quaker rejection of water baptism reflects a dualism between matter and spirit that is quite foreign to Orthodox sacramental spirituality.
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rakovsky
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« Reply #48 on: November 04, 2012, 10:01:05 PM »

Having been a regular worshiper at a Quaker church for a few years while in college, I would say that the Quaker rejection of water baptism reflects a dualism between matter and spirit that is quite foreign to Orthodox sacramental spirituality.
Peter,

Oh, I don't know - I think Orthodox also distinguish the two, but they value both - for example, there is resurrection of the physical body and the spiritual soul. I think all the sacraments have both a spiritual and physical aspect.

Besides that, I think the last several posts in this thread have given verses distinguishing the baptism with water from the baptism or coming on of the Holy Spirit. eg. I think Ashman made a good point of St Paul's words in Acts 10, where Paul encouraged baptism with "water" "in the name of Jesus" for some people who already had received the Spirit.

Two problems I have with the Quaker view are that:
1) Christ told the disciples to baptise all nations "in the name of" the Trinity, and Acts 10 suggests this means an act of water baptism that uses its name. And the example of the apostles shows they understood it as an act they performed. So I see water baptism as following His instruction, even if it can be rationalized away.

2) Even if one accepts the Quaker view that water baptism is actually unnecessary and the spirit's baptism is what counts in Christ's instruction, the Quakers aren't even really following that because they themselves do not do acts of spirit baptism. They do not directly pray for other individuals to get the spirit, which would mean this kind of baptising others in the spirit. Admittedly some Quakers may do this from time to time as a coincidence, but their teaching does not give this as a general instruction.

But Peter, it sounds like an interesting story you have. Have you written on the internet about coming to Orthodoxy, or perhaps you were visiting the Meeting while Orthodox because of the depth of Quaker spirituality, which admittedly has overlap with Orthodoxy?

Be good.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 10:04:50 PM by rakovsky » Logged
PeterTheAleut
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« Reply #49 on: November 15, 2012, 02:28:43 AM »

Having been a regular worshiper at a Quaker church for a few years while in college, I would say that the Quaker rejection of water baptism reflects a dualism between matter and spirit that is quite foreign to Orthodox sacramental spirituality.
Peter,

Oh, I don't know - I think Orthodox also distinguish the two, but they value both - for example, there is resurrection of the physical body and the spiritual soul. I think all the sacraments have both a spiritual and physical aspect.

Besides that, I think the last several posts in this thread have given verses distinguishing the baptism with water from the baptism or coming on of the Holy Spirit. eg. I think Ashman made a good point of St Paul's words in Acts 10, where Paul encouraged baptism with "water" "in the name of Jesus" for some people who already had received the Spirit.

Two problems I have with the Quaker view are that:
1) Christ told the disciples to baptise all nations "in the name of" the Trinity, and Acts 10 suggests this means an act of water baptism that uses its name. And the example of the apostles shows they understood it as an act they performed. So I see water baptism as following His instruction, even if it can be rationalized away.

2) Even if one accepts the Quaker view that water baptism is actually unnecessary and the spirit's baptism is what counts in Christ's instruction, the Quakers aren't even really following that because they themselves do not do acts of spirit baptism. They do not directly pray for other individuals to get the spirit, which would mean this kind of baptising others in the spirit. Admittedly some Quakers may do this from time to time as a coincidence, but their teaching does not give this as a general instruction.

But Peter, it sounds like an interesting story you have. Have you written on the internet about coming to Orthodoxy, or perhaps you were visiting the Meeting while Orthodox because of the depth of Quaker spirituality, which admittedly has overlap with Orthodoxy?

Be good.
I never really called myself a Quaker--kinda hard to do while I was also serving in the Marine Corps (Reserve). I just went to a Quaker church because it was the one that felt most like home-away-from-home while I was enrolled in an undergrad degree program at a Quaker college. The church was a member of the Northwest Yearly Meeting, which is probably much more like the conservative Wesleyan Christianity of my childhood than like classic Quakerism. This church actually had structured services like most Wesleyan/Methodist churches, while classic Quakers meet in silence and speak/sing only when they have the mind to.
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