Author Topic: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?  (Read 2294 times)

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Offline MichaelTheYounger

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Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« on: September 13, 2014, 08:45:43 AM »
Hi all,

I just started my first year in an academic masters degree in theological studies, and I have enrolled in Intro New Testament Greek. I'm picking it up fast and I'd really like to get my own copy of the Bible in Greek, preferably the Septuagint with apocrypha and the New Testament all in one volume, but I'll buy them separately if need be. Any recommendations? I looked on Amazon and saw a few but I want to be careful about what I'm buying. Something tells me there are a lot of bad/edited copies floating around.

Note: I am not learning modern Greek, so I'm not looking for a contemporary Greek Bible, but a Bible in koine Greek.

Thanks, and peace be with you.
"A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him, saying, 'You are mad; you are not like us.'" -St. Antony the Great

Offline Cyrillic

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2014, 10:45:24 AM »
Septuagint: Rahlfs-Hanhart Septuaginta - Editio Altera
New Testament: Novum Testamentum Graece 28 (Nestle-Aland)

Those are the standard academic editions. The Göttingen Septuagint would be even better, but that one is incomplete and extremely expensive. Unless you want to spend $3500 on the Septuagint alone you would want to go with Rahlfs.

You might want to look into the New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS) as well. The translators were liberal protestants, so some passages are translated in a rather strange way ("Divine wind" instead of "God's Spirit" in Genesis, for example - both are technically correct but the latter would be more theologically correct.) But it is often a nice help, especially if you are a beginner in Greek.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2014, 10:57:17 AM by Cyrillic »

Offline Luke

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2014, 02:27:19 PM »
^ Is there a good lexicon that goes with Ralfs-Henhard?

Offline Cyrillic

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2014, 02:35:50 PM »
A regular Greek dictionary would do. If you want a good Greek dictionary I recommend getting a second-hand Liddell and Scott (a.k.a. "A Greek–English Lexicon"). There is an Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint: Expanded Edition that you could buy, but I don't like that one at all. The lemmata are very limited. You should get a proper dictionary.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2014, 02:37:31 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline MichaelTheYounger

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2014, 02:52:39 PM »
I ended up ordering the Septuagint w/Apocrypha published by Sir L.C.L Brenton. It's apparently based in Codex Vaticanus, and I got an amazing deal in terms of the price. Have you heard anything about this edition?

Thanks for the dictionary recommendation, I'll probably do that.
"A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him, saying, 'You are mad; you are not like us.'" -St. Antony the Great

Offline Cyrillic

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2014, 02:54:50 PM »
I ended up ordering the Septuagint w/Apocrypha published by Sir L.C.L Brenton. It's apparently based in Codex Vaticanus, and I got an amazing deal in terms of the price. Have you heard anything about this edition?

I'm not a fan of his work. He only uses one manuscript, the work is fairly dated and the translation is meh.

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2014, 03:07:04 PM »
A regular Greek dictionary would do. If you want a good Greek dictionary I recommend getting a second-hand Liddell and Scott (a.k.a. "A Greek–English Lexicon"). There is an Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint: Expanded Edition that you could buy, but I don't like that one at all. The lemmata are very limited. You should get a proper dictionary.

Ah ah ah. Biblical Greek is categorically different from other Greek of any era. You must not have read the few hundred words in the appendix to Thayer's that Can't Be Translated Normally or read the recent fundamentalist expose of the drunken, devil-worshiping lives of Robert Scott and Henry George Liddell (or taken elementary Greek at an average Christian seminary).
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

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Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline MichaelTheYounger

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2014, 03:16:53 PM »
I ended up ordering the Septuagint w/Apocrypha published by Sir L.C.L Brenton. It's apparently based in Codex Vaticanus, and I got an amazing deal in terms of the price. Have you heard anything about this edition?

I'm not a fan of his work. He only uses one manuscript, the work is fairly dated and the translation is meh.

But I just want a copy of the Septuagint to practice reading Greek and to become acquainted with the sense of the content in it's original Greek rather than in translation. Will it do for this purpose?
"A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him, saying, 'You are mad; you are not like us.'" -St. Antony the Great

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2014, 03:26:36 PM »
Hi all,

I just started my first year in an academic masters degree in theological studies, and I have enrolled in Intro New Testament Greek. I'm picking it up fast and I'd really like to get my own copy of the Bible in Greek, preferably the Septuagint with apocrypha and the New Testament all in one volume, but I'll buy them separately if need be. Any recommendations? I looked on Amazon and saw a few but I want to be careful about what I'm buying. Something tells me there are a lot of bad/edited copies floating around.

Note: I am not learning modern Greek, so I'm not looking for a contemporary Greek Bible, but a Bible in koine Greek.

Thanks, and peace be with you.

Cyrillic informed you of the obvious standard. However, if you're interested, you do have alternatives. The recent craze for "1611 KVJ" has also brought some "Received Text" editions back to bookstores. Among these could be counted the edition of Dr. Scrivener, whose rather curious project was to amend the Greek better to match the English of the KJV. Drs. Hodges and Farstad developed a new methodology of source criticism illustrated with fascinating diagrams in the introduction to their The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text -- altho the rabidly Evangelical subheads in English with which they lace the edition can be offputting. And of course scouring Ebay you can find scores of out-of-print editions showcasing all kinds of eccentricities.

And of course I'll be surprised if nobody reminds you of the Karavidopoulos edition, authorized by the Ecumenical Patriarch.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2014, 03:31:36 PM »
Septuagint: Rahlfs-Hanhart Septuaginta - Editio Altera
New Testament: Novum Testamentum Graece 28 (Nestle-Aland)

Those are the standard academic editions. The Göttingen Septuagint would be even better, but that one is incomplete and extremely expensive. Unless you want to spend $3500 on the Septuagint alone you would want to go with Rahlfs.

You might want to look into the New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS) as well. The translators were liberal protestants, so some passages are translated in a rather strange way ("Divine wind" instead of "God's Spirit" in Genesis, for example - both are technically correct but the latter would be more theologically correct.) But it is often a nice help, especially if you are a beginner in Greek.

This edition may contain both compilations in one volume.
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Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2014, 03:33:51 PM »
I ended up ordering the Septuagint w/Apocrypha published by Sir L.C.L Brenton. It's apparently based in Codex Vaticanus, and I got an amazing deal in terms of the price. Have you heard anything about this edition?

I'm not a fan of his work. He only uses one manuscript, the work is fairly dated and the translation is meh.

But I just want a copy of the Septuagint to practice reading Greek and to become acquainted with the sense of the content in it's original Greek rather than in translation. Will it do for this purpose?


Yes. I actually think he used a second manuscript in later editions.
I reject all that I wrote that isn't in accordance with the teachings of the Orthodox Church. Also, my posts reflect my opinions (present or former) and nothing else.

Offline Cyrillic

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2014, 05:03:57 PM »
I ended up ordering the Septuagint w/Apocrypha published by Sir L.C.L Brenton. It's apparently based in Codex Vaticanus, and I got an amazing deal in terms of the price. Have you heard anything about this edition?

I'm not a fan of his work. He only uses one manuscript, the work is fairly dated and the translation is meh.

But I just want a copy of the Septuagint to practice reading Greek and to become acquainted with the sense of the content in it's original Greek rather than in translation. Will it do for this purpose?

Probably. Although I wouldn't use it when writing papers or articles.

A regular Greek dictionary would do. If you want a good Greek dictionary I recommend getting a second-hand Liddell and Scott (a.k.a. "A Greek–English Lexicon"). There is an Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint: Expanded Edition that you could buy, but I don't like that one at all. The lemmata are very limited. You should get a proper dictionary.

Ah ah ah. Biblical Greek is categorically different from other Greek of any era. You must not have read the few hundred words in the appendix to Thayer's that Can't Be Translated Normally or read the recent fundamentalist expose of the drunken, devil-worshiping lives of Robert Scott and Henry George Liddell (or taken elementary Greek at an average Christian seminary).

LOL. Nice one.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2014, 05:06:07 PM by Cyrillic »

Offline Luke

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2014, 06:12:44 PM »
A regular Greek dictionary would do. If you want a good Greek dictionary I recommend getting a secondhand Liddell and Scott (a.k.a. "A Greek–English Lexicon"). There is an Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint: Expanded Edition that you could buy, but I don't like that one at all. The lemmata are very limited. You should get a proper dictionary.
Thanks.  I do have Liddell and Scott -- That is, minus the devil worshipping. :angel: :police:

Offline methodius

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2014, 12:42:14 AM »
I shall resume breathing.......

a fundamentalist expose....... &c.
suggests that L and S were Templars, Freemasons, or [gasp] Orthodox!
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Offline methodius

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2014, 12:46:54 AM »
A regular Greek dictionary would do. If you want a good Greek dictionary I recommend getting a secondhand Liddell and Scott (a.k.a. "A Greek–English Lexicon"). There is an Analytical Lexicon to the Septuagint: Expanded Edition that you could buy, but I don't like that one at all. The lemmata are very limited. You should get a proper dictionary.
Thanks.  I do have Liddell and Scott -- That is, minus the devil worshipping. :angel: :police:
well, I hope you got you L&S at a substantial discount; you're missing most of the fun.
[kyrie eleison]
kyrie eleison

Offline Luke

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2014, 12:10:53 PM »
^ I don't remember.  I have had it for a few years. :-X

Offline Cyrillic

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Re: Recommendations on a Greek Bible?
« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2014, 12:13:16 PM »
Do fundies really hate L&S? That's rather hard to believe.