OrthodoxChristianity.net
December 22, 2014, 02:27:53 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why I Blame Homeschooling, Not Just My Parents  (Read 3698 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Cyrillic
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,038


Cyrillico est imperare orbi universo


« Reply #45 on: July 27, 2013, 03:55:44 AM »

the great books curriculum is quite popular among a small segment of american conservatives. afaik it's of straussian inspiration. perhaps some philosophia perennis thrown in as well.

Why is that a bad thing?
Logged

"Claret is the liquor for boys; port for men; but he who aspires to be a hero must drink brandy."
-Dr. Samuel Johnson
Gunnarr
Warned
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1,812



« Reply #46 on: July 27, 2013, 03:59:35 AM »

My Biology teacher was in favor of population control. also, she showed constantly a "REAL TIME NUMBER OF ALL TREES IN THE WORLD, WATCH AS THEY ALL FALL!!!!"

I made a nice graph, showing population rising when we got those new fangled farming equipment and the great migration to cities. anyway, she was very happy that I drew at the end of the graph a line going down. (lower population)


what does this have to do with the op? i don't know, its 3 AM
Logged

I am a demonic servant! Beware!
yeshuaisiam
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox, Anabaptist, Other Early Christianity kind of jumbled together
Posts: 4,514


A pulling horse cannot kick.


« Reply #47 on: July 28, 2013, 11:34:56 PM »

Blah, the OP article is just the exception from the rule.

Then there are homeschoolers like this young lady, who has authored several books, is an excellent photographer, and runs a magazine that is more dedicated to Christianity, than many things I've read.
http://kingsbloomingrose.com/

Often people who decide to be worldly hold hostility towards their parents who protected them from worldly things.   Some are mad because their parents didn't let them go to parties and get drunk in high school.  Later they blame "religious fanaticism" of their parents for all their faults.

I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but almost every homeschooler that I know believes in the scriptures and holds true to "training their children up in the lord".   Most try to teach them to follow God's will.
Logged

I learned how to be more frugal and save money at http://www.livingpress.com
mike
Warned
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,545


« Reply #48 on: July 29, 2013, 06:57:09 AM »

Most try to teach them to follow God's will.

What seems for them to be God's will.
Logged
podkarpatska
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 8,966


Pokrov


WWW
« Reply #49 on: July 29, 2013, 09:31:24 AM »

Most try to teach them to follow God's will.

What seems for them to be God's will.

Therein 'lies the rub' as Shakespeare noted.... How one discerns God's will is far from a unanimous thing among any culture's peoples.
Logged
pensateomnia
Bibliophylax
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Posts: 2,360


metron ariston


« Reply #50 on: July 29, 2013, 10:08:08 AM »

the great books curriculum is quite popular among a small segment of american conservatives. afaik it's of straussian inspiration. perhaps some philosophia perennis thrown in as well.

Why is that a bad thing?

Most "Great Books" programs at the university level are not conservative at all. Straussian ideas would be considered fringe, except in one or two places, as would any kind of "conservatism."

The movement began in Europe in the mid 19th century and was popularized in the US by Charles Eliot at Harvard as a kind of democratic form of adult education: if you aren't one of the blue bloods who can come to Harvard, then read this pre-packed set of "Harvard Classics" and you will become an educated person.
Logged

But for I am a man not textueel I wol noght telle of textes neuer a deel. (Chaucer, The Manciple's Tale, 1.131)
yeshuaisiam
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox, Anabaptist, Other Early Christianity kind of jumbled together
Posts: 4,514


A pulling horse cannot kick.


« Reply #51 on: July 30, 2013, 12:13:25 PM »

Most try to teach them to follow God's will.

What seems for them to be God's will.

Yes, they take what God said literally, and accept it as his will.
Logged

I learned how to be more frugal and save money at http://www.livingpress.com
wainscottbl
Aspie weirdo of the forum
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Somewhere between Rome and Constantinople (Roman Catholic investigating Eastern Orthodoxy)
Posts: 2,122



« Reply #52 on: July 31, 2013, 05:33:22 PM »

Hey, leave the Great Books alone. I know it is an American conservative reactionary thing, but its the best we can hope for in Amerika. I am a big fan of Great Books in the Most Serene Republic of the Godless Fremasonic Idiotic Libertarians.
Logged

"To love someone means to see him as God intended him."
                                                                   --Fyodor Dostoevsky
wainscottbl
Aspie weirdo of the forum
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Somewhere between Rome and Constantinople (Roman Catholic investigating Eastern Orthodoxy)
Posts: 2,122



« Reply #53 on: July 31, 2013, 05:38:51 PM »

Actually I think it can be said to be a general Anglo-American reactionary thing. Anglo-American religion and politics is messed up. If I was going to be a liberal, I would just be a communist because that is taking the Enlightenment ideals to their conclusion. Neo-conservatism and paleo-conservatism is just conservative liberalism of the 18th century. It is based on deism and secular humanism. It's a result, I am realising, of Western rationalism, but I am trying to avoid getting to emotional in my journey east. But one does begin to tire or Western legalaism and rationalism. It's such a deep issue, and not black and white. It's why I am not sure there is much hope in American politics. Everything is black and white, socialist vs capitalist, conservative vs liberal, constitution vs statism, liberatairn vs statist. The simple thing is to blame rationalism, though its not that simple.
Logged

"To love someone means to see him as God intended him."
                                                                   --Fyodor Dostoevsky
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2013, 07:23:08 AM »

Well I did all three during my lifetime: homeschooling, private schooling, and public schooling. Each of them were good in some ways and bad in others. Personally, I think the very worst out of the three was private schooling, because it was just an indoctrination ground for Evangelical religious-right weirdos to teach us their theology, ignore sections in the science textbook, and try to force right-wing politics on us, going so far as to tell us to try to urge our parents to vote for McCain over Obama.

Well, if you had gone to a good Episcopal school, you wouldn't have either of those problems....
Logged
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2013, 07:34:18 AM »

Actually I think it can be said to be a general Anglo-American reactionary thing. Anglo-American religion and politics is messed up. If I was going to be a liberal, I would just be a communist because that is taking the Enlightenment ideals to their conclusion.

Hmmmm, didn't go to one of those Episcopal schools, I see.....

Quote
Neo-conservatism and paleo-conservatism is just conservative liberalism of the 18th century.

Better, maybe....

Quote
It is based on deism and secular humanism. It's a result, I am realising, of Western rationalism, but I am trying to avoid getting to emotional in my journey east.

...where all they've ever heard of is autocracy and subservience to the throne. Look, there are probably more subtle ways to look at the ostensibly conservative/liberal split in American politics; the fact that the supposedly hopelessly liberal president has a comprehensive spying program on everyone and that his only serious opposition seems to be a few cranky public affairs journals and a single loopy libertarian congresscritter shows that the conventional casting of the parties is, as usual, inaccurate. Meanwhile eastern irrationalism produces Putin and 1/5 of the PIIGS. You can snark about western rationalism all you want, but seeing as how every aspect of the medium which carries your snarking is a product of western rationalism, you really don't have a leg to stand on.
Logged
john_mo
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antioch
Posts: 857



« Reply #56 on: August 07, 2013, 06:36:19 AM »

I know several products of home-schooling from the US, Canada, Australia and England.  Every single one of them is socially awkward and to a substantial degree.  It has become predictable for me.

However, I have seen some good examples of children who have had mixed home-schooling.
Logged

Love is not blind; that is the last thing that it is. Love is bound; and the more it is bound the less it is blind.

—G.K. Chesterton
Seraphim98
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 567



« Reply #57 on: August 09, 2013, 10:02:42 PM »

I've been in education for several years and have taught both in public and private schools and at jr. colleges. I have met precisely 1 homeschooled student I believed would have been better off in the public or private system. Every other homeschooler I've known has been well adjusted, mature, and possessed an education at graduation that was far superior to their publicly graduated classmates in many respects. They tracked a year to two ahead of their public peers in just about every academic discipline. Granted I may have been fortunate in the homeschoolers I've met, but for those that I did meet, it was definitely the better choice for them and their families…with that one exception.
Logged
john_mo
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antioch
Posts: 857



« Reply #58 on: February 03, 2014, 09:01:46 AM »

I've been in education for several years and have taught both in public and private schools and at jr. colleges. I have met precisely 1 homeschooled student I believed would have been better off in the public or private system. Every other homeschooler I've known has been well adjusted, mature, and possessed an education at graduation that was far superior to their publicly graduated classmates in many respects. They tracked a year to two ahead of their public peers in just about every academic discipline. Granted I may have been fortunate in the homeschoolers I've met, but for those that I did meet, it was definitely the better choice for them and their families…with that one exception.

Interesting how we have opposite opinions based on our experiences. 

I really would like it if what you said is true, but at the moment, I fear that homeschooling bears some strange fruit.  I worked with a couple of Orthodox that were home schooled.  They were priest kids and everyone thought they were weird, including yours truly. 
Logged

Love is not blind; that is the last thing that it is. Love is bound; and the more it is bound the less it is blind.

—G.K. Chesterton
scamandrius
Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
Moderated
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: I'm Greek and proud of it, damn it!
Posts: 6,279



« Reply #59 on: February 03, 2014, 02:59:46 PM »

I've been in education for several years and have taught both in public and private schools and at jr. colleges. I have met precisely 1 homeschooled student I believed would have been better off in the public or private system. Every other homeschooler I've known has been well adjusted, mature, and possessed an education at graduation that was far superior to their publicly graduated classmates in many respects. They tracked a year to two ahead of their public peers in just about every academic discipline. Granted I may have been fortunate in the homeschoolers I've met, but for those that I did meet, it was definitely the better choice for them and their families…with that one exception.

Interesting how we have opposite opinions based on our experiences. 

I really would like it if what you said is true, but at the moment, I fear that homeschooling bears some strange fruit.  I worked with a couple of Orthodox that were home schooled.  They were priest kids and everyone thought they were weird, including yours truly. 

You thought the kids were weird so therefore all homeschooled kids are weird?  What kind of warped logic is that?

I am a teacher as well.  i've been in both the private and public systems.  Every year my students compete against homeschooled kids at the NeJCL convention.  The homeschooled kids always do very well.  During the social events, they are fine and mingle and socialize just like any other kid there.  So, since this is my experience, therefore, homeschooled kids are not weird.  My experience trumps yours.  Isn't that the thrust of your whole argument?
Logged

I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene
Tags:
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.081 seconds with 43 queries.