Poll

Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?

No.
33 (61.1%)
No. Although they worship the same God as do the Jews, they are not Trinitarian.
5 (9.3%)
Don't know. God knows.
6 (11.1%)
Possibly. It is a mystery beyond my pay check.
3 (5.6%)
Yes, they do worship the same God. We are all God's children.
7 (13%)

Total Members Voted: 54

Author Topic: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?  (Read 13379 times)

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Offline jewish voice

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #135 on: August 20, 2014, 03:18:11 AM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #136 on: August 20, 2014, 11:14:09 AM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?
« Last Edit: August 20, 2014, 11:17:23 AM by minasoliman »
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #137 on: August 20, 2014, 12:59:12 PM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?

POM -- wonderful. Thanks, Mina!
The memory of God should be treasured in our hearts like the precious pearl mentioned in the Holy Gospel. Our life's goal should be to nurture and contemplate God always within, and never let it depart, for this steadfastness will drive demons away from us. - Paraphrased from St. Philotheus of Sinai
Writings from the Philokalia: On Prayer of the Heart,
Translated from the Russian by E. Kadloubovksy and G.E.H. Palmer, Faber and Faber, London, Boston, 1992 printing.

Offline jewish voice

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #138 on: August 20, 2014, 07:50:51 PM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?

...
"Of course, this solution isn't perfect," the rabbi added, "but it is the best option. There is no prohibition on praying in mosques (apart for the Ran's - Rabbi Nissim ben Reuven ruling, which was not accepted)."

Rabbi Efrati noted that an example was the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, which has a mosque.
...

fixed quote tag
-Mina


Remodified to keep in conformity with the rules on quoting articles.  Source provided in later post.
-Mina
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 12:49:43 AM by minasoliman »

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #139 on: August 20, 2014, 10:35:55 PM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?

...
"Of course, this solution isn't perfect," the rabbi added, "but it is the best option. There is no prohibition on praying in mosques (apart for the Ran's - Rabbi Nissim ben Reuven ruling, which was not accepted)."

Rabbi Efrati noted that an example was the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, which has a mosque.
...

fixed quote tag
-Mina


Remodified to keep in conformity with the rules on quoting articles.  Source provided in later post.
-Mina

And?
btw, have you ever heard of sourcing a citation?
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 12:50:34 AM by minasoliman »
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #140 on: August 20, 2014, 11:20:00 PM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?

...
"Of course, this solution isn't perfect," the rabbi added, "but it is the best option. There is no prohibition on praying in mosques (apart for the Ran's - Rabbi Nissim ben Reuven ruling, which was not accepted)."

Rabbi Efrati noted that an example was the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, which has a mosque.
...

fixed quote tag
-Mina


Remodified to keep in conformity with the rules on quoting articles.  Source provided in later post.
-Mina


JV,

I appreciate you continuing this discussion with me.  But don't take this the wrong way.  If this is your personal story with a Rabbi you knew and liked, then please make that clear.  But if this comes from a source, you must site it under the rules of this forum site.  I appreciate your cooperation with this ASAP.

God bless.

Mina
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 12:51:16 AM by minasoliman »
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.

Offline jewish voice

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Offline jewish voice

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #142 on: August 21, 2014, 12:21:17 AM »
Yes, but in Islam, the Sakinah is a created intermediary of God in Islam.  In Judaism, it's the indwelling presence of Yahweh.
no and no

Great comeback argument.  Really refuted it there.
I know what your tryin to say that in Islam Allah isn't a personal God but Allah is more closer to a believer than his jugular vein. Judaism don't mean indwelling as a Christian would. What more can I say on it



I've provided with links that say the contrary.  It's your word vs. their's pretty much.

It's a very simple concept really.  I'm not talking about the Trinity because that's too complicated for you at the moment.  Just God with a divine nature that present in all places, but can also be present IN an assembly or IN a person.  He was present in the Temple, and He is believed to be present in an assembly of judges and those who pray together.

What Judaism defines as Shekinah and what Islam defines as Shekinah is completely different.  It's not the same God (and to be frank, in Islam, it's not even God).
present and dwell in are two different things. Yes God is present there are examples such as the cloud and fire in exodus. Yes the Torah says God dwelled in the temple yes Jews called it shekinah but the word shekinah is not in the Torah. So I take it to mean Gods present in the temple . Still not what you want it to mean. Quran talks of God  being present as well same thing I really don't see how this matters. As to your links well clearly the group of Jews stayed Jewish so just cause words maybe the same or you try to use words in the same manner don't change the fact you believe Jesus is God. Which Jews or Muslim will not except.

Why do you always have to come back to Jesus?  I'm talking about Judaism and Islam, very strictly.  You seem to gravitate back to try to attack Christianity.  I'm only challenging your assertion that Islam and Judaism worships the same God.  You seem very desperate to make that point and then point out that Christianity worships a different God.  I'm not claiming we all worship the same God.  I'm challenging you worship the same God as Judaism.

The word "Shekinah" means dwelling.  And that word is in the Torah in its verb form.  The Shekinah is the dwelling place of the presence of God.  The Targum and the Talmud were very clear about the Shekinah, as the Jewish Encyclopedia shared.

Tell me my friend, what does it mean for God to dwell in the Temple?  What does it mean for the Shekinah to rest with ten in prayer, or 3 who judge? Or "over the head-side of a sick man?"  Does God dwell in the mosque?  Does God dwell with this who pray five times a day?  Can God dwell in anything in this world according to Islam?  Do you worship the God that dwelt in Jerusalem, in Mount Zion, in the Tabernacle?

...
"Of course, this solution isn't perfect," the rabbi added, "but it is the best option. There is no prohibition on praying in mosques (apart for the Ran's - Rabbi Nissim ben Reuven ruling, which was not accepted)."

Rabbi Efrati noted that an example was the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, which has a mosque.
...

fixed quote tag
-Mina


Remodified to keep in conformity with the rules on quoting articles.  Source provided in later post.
-Mina

And?
btw, have you ever heard of sourcing a citation?
btw I just sourced it. And ?
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 12:52:04 AM by minasoliman »

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #143 on: August 21, 2014, 01:04:44 AM »
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.

Offline jewish voice

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #144 on: August 21, 2014, 01:46:31 AM »
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 01:48:15 AM by jewish voice »

Offline minasoliman

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #145 on: August 21, 2014, 01:56:19 AM »
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.


You make an interesting point.  I can't deny that.  It seems however, Judaism allows for both an indwelling God and a non-indwelling God at the same time.  Judaism today sounds like a living contradiction of itself, as you pointed out earlier.  Perhaps Jews have no problems in praying in a mosque, but Islam is not as flexible in this regard as Jews are.
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.

Offline jewish voice

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #146 on: August 21, 2014, 02:24:47 AM »
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.


You make an interesting point.  I can't deny that.  It seems however, Judaism allows for both an indwelling God and a non-indwelling God at the same time.  Judaism today sounds like a living contradiction of itself, as you pointed out earlier.  Perhaps Jews have no problems in praying in a mosque, but Islam is not as flexible in this regard as Jews are.
actually more flexible. I just looked it up and I was wrong oh no did I just say that :laugh:
It is permissible to pray in any place, as long the place is clean (tahir). However, praying in a church, temple or any other religious place without any necessity is makrooh.

It is possible that some people of those religions may not like to see us praying in their places of worship and we should not hurt other people’s feelings. If we have to pray in those places then we should take proper permission from the authorities that govern those sanctuaries.
http://www.onislam.net/english/ask-the-scholar/acts-of-worship/prayer/places-of-prayer-mosques/175423.html

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Re: Do Muslims worship the same God as do Jews and Trinitarian Christians?
« Reply #147 on: August 21, 2014, 02:29:47 AM »
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.


You make an interesting point.  I can't deny that.  It seems however, Judaism allows for both an indwelling God and a non-indwelling God at the same time.  Judaism today sounds like a living contradiction of itself, as you pointed out earlier.  Perhaps Jews have no problems in praying in a mosque, but Islam is not as flexible in this regard as Jews are.
actually more flexible. I just looked it up and I was wrong oh no did I just say that :laugh:
It is permissible to pray in any place, as long the place is clean (tahir). However, praying in a church, temple or any other religious place without any necessity is makrooh.

It is possible that some people of those religions may not like to see us praying in their places of worship and we should not hurt other people’s feelings. If we have to pray in those places then we should take proper permission from the authorities that govern those sanctuaries.
http://www.onislam.net/english/ask-the-scholar/acts-of-worship/prayer/places-of-prayer-mosques/175423.html

Interesting...thank you for that.

I don't remember you saying that.  But I do remember you mentioning Judaism has flexibility in belief of God, whereas Islam does not.  I extended this same logic to places of worship, although as you showed, that's not necessarily the case.
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.