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Author Topic: Pope Benedict XVI Asking for Orthodox-Catholic Unity  (Read 2310 times) Average Rating: 0
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Hadel
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« on: May 01, 2005, 10:38:40 AM »

Hi all,

I thought this was interesting...from CNN

In Christ,
Hadel

The pope blessed the crowd in St. Peter's Square.
 

ROME, Italy (AP) -- Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday made the first appearance of his papacy at the window of his apartment, telling tens of thousands of faithful and curious he was keeping up the cherished tradition of his beloved predecessor, John Paul II, who had last appeared to crowds in St. Peter's Square in silent suffering.

With some 50,000 people gathered in the square below, Benedict stood at the window of the papal apartment, which he moved into on Saturday, blessed the crowd, wished Orthodox Christians a happy Easter and said he hoped efforts toward Christian unity would continue.

He also denounced wars across the globe and paid tribute to the world's workers.

May 1 is labor day in many countries, and many in the crowd had come to Rome to participate in a huge rally and concert scheduled for Sunday evening. The turnout in St. Peter's Square was one of the largest for the customary Sunday noon window appearance.

"I address you, my very dear brothers and sisters, for the first time from this window that the beloved figure of my predecessor made familiar to countless people in the entire world," Benedict said from the third-floor window of the apostolic palace.

"From Sunday to Sunday, John Paul II, faithful to an appointment which became a cherished habit, accompanied for more than a quarter-century the history of the Church and of the world, and we continue to feel him closer to us than ever," said Benedict, interrupted often by cheers.

John Paul died on April 2, three days after his last time at the window, when he made a silent appearance and raised his hand in blessing. German Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, one of John Paul's closest aides, was elected pontiff on April 19.

In the 15-minute appearance, Benedict, wearing a white cassock, issued a call for continued efforts to bridge the gap between Catholics and Orthodox.

Wishing "from the heart" a happy Easter to Orthodox Christians, Benedict said that God "is asking us to travel decisively down the path toward full unity."

John Paul had made better relations with the Orthodox a main goal of his 26-year-long papacy.

Like John Paul, Benedict used the window appearance to talk about current problems on the world scene.

After expressing his dismay over "wars, poverty and diseases" in the world, Benedict singled out the African nation of Togo, wracked by deadly violence after contested elections. He expressed closeness to Togo's people, "disturbed by painful internal struggle," and said he was praying for "harmony and peace."

After greeting pilgrims in Italian and Spanish, Benedict raised his arms in greeting several times and offered his blessing.

An Italian in the crowd, Sabina Domenici, said that her German and Austrian friends who were in the square were "disappointed that he didn't speak in German, but right now he knows he needs to conquer the hearts of Romans."

John Paul knew how to delight a crowd and often joked with the faithful during the window appearances.

Benedict did add a few lines that weren't in his prepared text, including joking that he, too, is named Joseph, in a reference to St. Joseph, the church's patron saint of workers.





   
     
 
 
   

 

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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2005, 03:40:20 PM »

His Holiness is following his predecessor. Catholics very much desire that all Christs children may be as one. What seems impossible to man in some way will certainly be possible to God.

Just today I read these word from John Pauls Catechesis "Theotokos- Woman, Mother, Disciple"

Quote
At the end of Lumen gentium the Council invites us to entrust the unity of Christians to Mary: "The entire body of the faithful pours forth urgent supplications to the Mother of God and of men that she, who aided the beginnings of the Church by her prayers, may now, exalted as she is above all the angels and saints, intercede before her Son in the fellowship of all the saints" (ibid.).

Just as Mary's presence in the early community fostered oneness of heart, which prayer strengthened and made visible (cf. Acts 1:14), so the most intense communion with her whom Augustine called the "Mother of unity" (Sermo 192, 2; PL 38, 1013) will be able to bring Christians to the point of enjoying the long-awaited gift of ecumenical unity.

Through Mary we pray for unity and harmony

We ceaselessly pray to the Blessed Virgin so that, just as at the beginning she supported the journey of the Christian community's oneness in prayer and the proclamation of the Gospel, so today she may obtain through her intercession reconciliation and full communion among all believers in Christ....

The peace, harmony and unity for which the Church and humanity hope still seem far away. Nevertheless, they are a gift of the Spirit to be constantly sought, as we learn from Mary and trust in her intercession.
http://www.ewtn.com/library/papaldoc/jp2bvm70.htm
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Hadel
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2005, 04:20:17 AM »

Hi,

Yes, thank you...I pray for Unity, and only by God's will and not mans...not only unity between Christians, but all religions.

I believe "In the end all we'll see the Truth."

God Bless,
Hadel
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2005, 05:28:54 AM »

We all pray for unity. I think it is possible, if we open our hearts to the Holy Spirit in prayer.
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2005, 08:38:35 AM »

Quote
Benedict said that God "is asking us to travel decisively down the path toward full unity."

Does this mean that a "partial" unity already exists? Does this mean that if I think that Roman Catholicism must accept Orthodox doctrine for unity to be possible, then I am disobeying God? Does my belief that the Byzantine Catholic Churches are not Orthodox (despite their appearance), and that they are certainly NOT a model for "unity" make me recalcitrant and disobedient to the "requests" of "God"?
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« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2005, 10:55:44 PM »

Does this mean that a "partial" unity already exists?

I'd like to be more hopeful and say that, in a sense, we do have a partial unity of sorts already. The two Churches have made great strides in dialogue and even sympathy, something we've not seen for a very long time. Granted, the road to unity is still very touchy and still needs to be worked out, but we are hopeful.
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« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2005, 05:03:59 AM »


...make me recalcitrant and disobedient to the "requests" of "God"?

...to the requests of the latins more likely.  Wink
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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2005, 06:09:57 AM »



Does this mean that a "partial" unity already exists?

I think that the Catholic Church recognises the validity of Orthodox sacraments (I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong). Using sacraments as a basis for at least partial unity is a possible way of going forward in love. If we want to. I think I'm write in saying that being in communion with the Bishop of Rome is one of the definitions of membership in the Catholic Church. Recognising Papal infallability may not necessarily be a pre-condition to sacramental unity.
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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2005, 07:34:43 AM »

Recognising Papal infallability may not necessarily be a pre-condition to sacramental unity.
Perhaps not from a Roman Catholic point of view, but it certainly is from an Orthodox point of view. According to Orthodoxy, Sacramental unity must be based on dogmatic unity.
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