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Author Topic: First Visit to a Coptic Church Tomorrow  (Read 1402 times) Average Rating: 0
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TheTrisagion
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« Reply #45 on: June 08, 2014, 10:12:16 PM »

So when are you converting?  Wink
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« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2014, 09:38:27 AM »

no need to convert, we have the same faith!
 angel
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« Reply #47 on: June 09, 2014, 05:56:28 PM »

Hey, I'm just visiting for now. angel
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« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2014, 10:30:34 PM »

As a general rule, the Liturgy of St. Basil is addressed to the Father and the Liturgy of St. Gregory is addressed to the Son, but sometimes, some priests like to do an "overlap" (interestingly enough, the Coptic Gregorian is textually similar to the Byzantine Basilian).  The Coptic Basilian is relatively shorter, and is the standard in the Coptic Church (kinda like St. John Chrysostom's liturgy the standard in the EO churches).  The Coptic Gregorian is slightly longer, and is generally used on Feast Days in the Coptic Church.  If you like to read the texts, they are available here:

http://www.copticchurch.net/topics/liturgy/index.html
« Last Edit: June 09, 2014, 10:31:01 PM by minasoliman » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: June 09, 2014, 10:42:27 PM »

As a general rule, the Liturgy of St. Basil is addressed to the Father and the Liturgy of St. Gregory is addressed to the Son, but sometimes, some priests like to do an "overlap" (interestingly enough, the Coptic Gregorian is textually similar to the Byzantine Basilian).  The Coptic Basilian is relatively shorter, and is the standard in the Coptic Church (kinda like St. John Chrysostom's liturgy the standard in the EO churches).  The Coptic Gregorian is slightly longer, and is generally used on Feast Days in the Coptic Church.  If you like to read the texts, they are available here:

http://www.copticchurch.net/topics/liturgy/index.html

Interesting, thank you. I never thought of the Liturgy being addressed to a specific person of the Trinity.

Also, am I correct in saying that I heard a sort of general absolution during the liturgy?
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« Reply #50 on: June 09, 2014, 10:58:19 PM »

There is an absolution at the end of matins, and at the end of liturgy. When deacons(and priests if a bishop is present) out on their liturgical vestments they receive absolution from the highest ranking clergyman present.
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« Reply #51 on: June 10, 2014, 12:17:10 AM »

There are multiple general absolutions
1. End of matins
2. End of the offertory (Absolution of ministers)
3. End of the Creed (more of a general reconciliation than an absolution)
4. End of the Fraction prayers (after the Lord's prayer)


By the way, you came in at the end of the Intercession hymn, which is the beginning of the Liturgy of the Word. And don't worry about your standing so much. Keep in mind that in my church we started at 9AM, finished the liturgy late around 12:30PM, took a break till 3:30PM and started the genuflection (sagda/prostration) prayers which finished at 7pm. You came on a major feast. It's not like that usually.

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« Reply #52 on: June 10, 2014, 02:50:47 AM »

^Thank you for the explanations. Smiley

I was just caught off guard I suppose, since the Byzantine tradition seems to abbreviate so much even on Pentecost.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 02:50:56 AM by Nephi » Logged

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« Reply #53 on: June 10, 2014, 02:52:42 AM »

During the Liturgy, Psalm 150 will be chanted with refrains in between reiterating that Christ ascended to the heavens and sent us the Paraclete.  After Psalm 150 is done, my favorite hymn will be chanted "Asomen".  It is usually chanted in four languages, Greek, Coptic, Arabic, and English, and there are 5 verses.  So 5 times 4, that makes 20.  If you have a good choir that ups the tune of this hymn, you'll enjoy it.  Smiley  (My pet peeve is finding a parish that is unwilling to strain their vocal cords for just 10 minutes on this hymn, and I grew up that way in Jersey City).

At the end, Abouna will be spraying everyone and give the concluding prayers.  If you start at 8AM, I think you might be able to finish by noon.  Wink  But some parishes might be faster.

Asomen:

http://tasbeha.org/hymn_library/view/1099

I just now realized that the hymn I liked so much at the service was the one you had showed me beforehand. Tongue It's been stuck in my head off and on ever since, especially the "Amen Alleluia" part.
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« Reply #54 on: June 10, 2014, 06:40:26 AM »

Did you notice a basket filled with white head coverings for the women? When I attended, all women had their heads covered.

Didn't see a basket with head coverings, but all women did cover when they went up to receive communion and a good number were covered the entire time (maybe a little less than half).
When I attended a Coptic Liturgy in Egypt, only some women wore headcoverings for the entire time, but for the Communion all of them put headscarfs that they had taken with themselves.


no need to convert, we have the same faith!
 angel
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By the way, you came in at the end of the Intercession hymn, which is the beginning of the Liturgy of the Word. And don't worry about your standing so much. Keep in mind that in my church we started at 9AM, finished the liturgy late around 12:30PM, took a break till 3:30PM and started the genuflection (sagda/prostration) prayers which finished at 7pm. You came on a major feast. It's not like that usually.
Wow, that's really long! And that's great you had prostration service in the afternoon, separately from the Liturgy (at least in EO tradition this serviced is presribed for the vespers, but currently usually it's done just right after the Liturgy)

I was just caught off guard I suppose, since the Byzantine tradition seems to abbreviate so much even on Pentecost.
Well, at my parish (that it's absolutely not any good model as it goes for the liturgics) we had 2 hours of Vespers and Matins and 3 hours of Liturgy and the kneeling vespers, so it wasn't so bad.
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