Author Topic: What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?  (Read 583 times)

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Offline scamandrius

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What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?
« on: November 08, 2015, 07:16:21 PM »
We all know the story that emissaries from Prince Vladimir came to COnstantinople and observed a service at the Church of the Holy Wisdom.  Do we know what exactly they saw that caused them to report back to Vladimir with such enthusiasm which began the conversion of the Rus?  The reason I ask is because if it was the Liturgy, wouldn't those emissaries be precluded from the Liturgy?  Weren't non-Orthodox and non-baptized not allowed to be present at the Liturgy following τας Θυρας?  Or was that custom already done away with?  Just curious.
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Offline Iconodule

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Re: What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2015, 07:31:00 PM »
No, of course they didn't see the liturgy. They saw this:

Quote
“A goose to hatch the Crystal Egg after an Eagle had half-hatched it! Aye, aye, to be sure, that’s right,” said the Old Woman of Beare. “And now you must go find out what happened to it. Go now, and when you come back I will give you your name.”
- from The King of Ireland's Son, by Padraic Colum

Offline Cavaradossi

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Re: What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2015, 07:38:14 PM »
We all know the story that emissaries from Prince Vladimir came to COnstantinople and observed a service at the Church of the Holy Wisdom.  Do we know what exactly they saw that caused them to report back to Vladimir with such enthusiasm which began the conversion of the Rus?  The reason I ask is because if it was the Liturgy, wouldn't those emissaries be precluded from the Liturgy?  Weren't non-Orthodox and non-baptized not allowed to be present at the Liturgy following τας Θυρας?  Or was that custom already done away with?  Just curious.

That rule has often been "broken" by oikonomia, much like the rule that antidoron is only for the faithful (which several canonists believed could be disregarded for the sake of granting the heterodox some measure of participation in our liturgies). It wouldn't be surprising if the emissaries of the Rus' were admitted under similar circumstances to observe the liturgy of the faithful.
Be comforted, and have faith, O Israel, for your God is infinitely simple and one, composed of no parts.

Offline scamandrius

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Re: What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2015, 07:39:10 PM »
No, of course they didn't see the liturgy. They saw this:



Is that you doing "Future World" at karaoke? ;)
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Offline scamandrius

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Re: What did the ambassadors from Vladimir see in Hagia Sophia?
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2015, 07:40:05 PM »
We all know the story that emissaries from Prince Vladimir came to COnstantinople and observed a service at the Church of the Holy Wisdom.  Do we know what exactly they saw that caused them to report back to Vladimir with such enthusiasm which began the conversion of the Rus?  The reason I ask is because if it was the Liturgy, wouldn't those emissaries be precluded from the Liturgy?  Weren't non-Orthodox and non-baptized not allowed to be present at the Liturgy following τας Θυρας?  Or was that custom already done away with?  Just curious.

That rule has often been "broken" by oikonomia, much like the rule that antidoron is only for the faithful (which several canonists believed could be disregarded for the sake of granting the heterodox some measure of participation in our liturgies). It wouldn't be surprising if the emissaries of the Rus' were admitted under similar circumstances to observe the liturgy of the faithful.

But do we know for a fact what those emissaries saw?
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