Author Topic: Narratives of Our Lord’s Passion and Resurrection read one day earlier?  (Read 182 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MiniCooperS1275

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Greetings to all.

I am new to this, so please excuse me if the question appears odd, or if the answer to it is obvious.

I noticed that for Holy Week, the 12 Gospels of Our Lord’s Passion are read on Holy Thursday instead of Good Friday, and the narrative of Our Lord’s Resurrection is read on Holy Saturday instead of Easter Sunday. Is there a reason for this one-day offset (if it is, in fact, considered an offset)?

Thanks.

Offline SolEX01

  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,142
    • Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Metropolis of New Jersey
The Bridegroom Matins are performed in the evening in anticipation of the following day (e.g. Palm Sunday night services are the Holy Monday matins, etc.)

These services are translated to the evening to facilitate attendance by the faithful.  There is a Vesperal Divine Liturgy on Holy Thursday to commemorate the institution of the Eucharist.  The service can take place at 6:30 AM or 2:00 PM to facilitate attendance by those faithful interested in receiving Communion.

There is no Divine Liturgy on Good Friday.

On Holy Saturday, the service is a Vesperal Divine Liturgy referred to as the first Resurrection.

Offline Nephi

  • Monster Tamer
  • Section Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,762
Greetings to all.

I am new to this, so please excuse me if the question appears odd, or if the answer to it is obvious.

I noticed that for Holy Week, the 12 Gospels of Our Lord’s Passion are read on Holy Thursday instead of Good Friday, and the narrative of Our Lord’s Resurrection is read on Holy Saturday instead of Easter Sunday. Is there a reason for this one-day offset (if it is, in fact, considered an offset)?

Thanks.

It isn't truly a one-day offset since liturgically a day is "sundown to sundown." It's similar to Jews, if you recall that their Sabbath observances start Friday night and they're free to do whatever come Saturday night. As such, Holy Saturday's night is actually (liturgically) Easter Sunday. I believe Vespers brings a liturgical day to its end, but I may be wrong.

Offline SolEX01

  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,142
    • Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Metropolis of New Jersey
I believe Vespers brings a liturgical day to its end, but I may be wrong.

Vespers starts a liturgical day at sundown.  Example, a church, when it has its feast day, has Vespers on the evening before the actual feast since sundown is the beginning of the Liturgical day.

Offline Nephi

  • Monster Tamer
  • Section Moderator
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,762
I believe Vespers brings a liturgical day to its end, but I may be wrong.

Vespers starts a liturgical day at sundown.  Example, a church, when it has its feast day, has Vespers on the evening before the actual feast since sundown is the beginning of the Liturgical day.

Oh okay, that makes sense and helps explain Vesperal-Liturgies.