OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 16, 2014, 09:45:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Orthodoxy and the Imagination  (Read 1219 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,411



« on: March 24, 2005, 12:10:56 PM »

The inevitable thread condemning Harry Potter over on the E-Cafe has spawned a discussion of Orthodoxy and fantasy which leads me to raise the same issue over here. The responses over there are uniformly negative: fantasy (and indeed fiction itself) is bad, not to mention the imagination. Frankly I'm dubious, and it seems to me that some of those cited are falling into a dualistic and even manichean heresy.

Can someone come up with a wider range of opinion, particularly among the Fathers?
« Last Edit: March 24, 2005, 12:11:19 PM by Keble » Logged
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,420


« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2005, 12:43:05 PM »

The inevitable thread condemning Harry Potter over on the E-Cafe...

So, are you saying that the Harry Potter thread doesn't exist yet?  I'm rather surprised.
Logged
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,411



« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2005, 01:21:23 PM »

Oh, no. It's a two year old thread that was recently revived with a new post (look towards the bottom.

BTW, the next to the last article on the page appears to be out of context. I cannot find a full text of the interview, but it seems more likely that the "someone evil" of whom she speaks is the chief villain-- not Harry.

BTW, I don't want to talk about Harry Potter here.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2005, 01:22:17 PM by Keble » Logged
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,444


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2005, 02:04:01 PM »

http://www.orthodoxytoday.org/articles2/PhotikiHarryPotter.shtml
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Disclaimer: Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodo
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,420


« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2005, 02:50:42 PM »

Oh, no. It's a two year old thread that was recently revived with a new post (look towards the bottom.

BTW, the next to the last article on the page appears to be out of context. I cannot find a full text of the interview, but it seems more likely that the "someone evil" of whom she speaks is the chief villain-- not Harry.

BTW, I don't want to talk about Harry Potter here.


My question was purely semantics, as you seemed to imply that thread hadn't been created yet by saying 'inevitable'.  I guess you were using a past tense.
Logged
GiC
Resident Atheist
Site Supporter
Merarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Mathematician
Posts: 9,490



« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2005, 03:28:05 PM »

This is the faith of the apostles! This is the faith of the fathers! This is the Orthodox faith! This faith has established the universe!

And the best thing we can find to do with it is to criticize children's books? The way some of these people react to works of fiction, you would think that they were tantamount to the writings of Arius and Nestorius.

That's an interesting article Anastasios, I haven't done more than skim through it, but I find the fact that a Bishop actually went to the trouble to write a Scholarly article in defence of a children's book amusing...it is absurd that there were actually events that led him to come to the conclusion that he needed to write such an article.

Sometimes people just take things too seriously, far more seriously than they were ever intended to be taken.
Logged

"The liberties of people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." -- Patrick Henry
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,444


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2005, 03:55:58 PM »

I agree, greekischristian, that it is absurd. but I am glad that the bishop took the time to defend this issue because if left unchecked, our Church might end up like the fundamentalists. It happened in the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church in the 1970's and 80's for instance, where the fundamentalists took over.

Anastasios
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Disclaimer: Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodo
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,444


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2005, 03:57:10 PM »

BTW, I am sure it doesn't need to be said that I see a difference between fundamentalism (bad) and striving to adhere to traditional Orthodox praxis (good).
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Disclaimer: Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodo
GiC
Resident Atheist
Site Supporter
Merarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Mathematician
Posts: 9,490



« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2005, 04:59:13 PM »

Dont worry, I am not as liberal as all of my instructors...I realise that can (though there may not always) be a difference between fundamentalists and traditionalists...I probaly tend to get labeled a traditionalist more often than not Wink
Logged

"The liberties of people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." -- Patrick Henry
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2005, 05:32:15 PM »

Dont worry, I am not as liberal as all of my instructors...I realise that can (though there may not always) be a difference between fundamentalists and traditionalists...I probaly tend to get labeled a traditionalist more often than not Wink

Good for you. Someone's must keep 'dem crazy Greeks straight!
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Posts: 29,784



« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2005, 12:58:14 AM »

I think St. Basil covered it pretty well in his Address to Young Men on the Right Use of Greek Literature. Here are some excerpts, which I think are applicable to modern day texts (and shows) that are fantasy/science fiction/etc...

Quote
Into the life eternal the Holy Scriptures lead us, which teach us through divine words. But so long as our immaturity forbids our understanding their deep thought, we exercise our spiritual perceptions upon profane writings, which are not altogether different, and in which we perceive the truth as it were in shadows and in mirrors...
 
If, then, there is any affinity between the two literatures, a knowledge of them should be useful to us in our search for truth; if not, the comparison, by emphasizing the contrast, will be of no small service in strengthening our regard for the better one. With what now may we compare these two kinds of education to obtain a simile? Just as it is the chief mission of the tree to bear its fruit in its season, though at the same time it puts forth for ornament the leaves which quiver on its boughs, even so the real fruit of the soul is truth, yet it is not without advantage for it to embrace the pagan wisdom, as also leaves offer shelter to the fruit, and an appearance not untimely...

When they [the Greek Poets] recount the words and deeds of good men, you should both love and imitate them, earnestly emulating such conduct. But when they portray base conduct, you must flee from them and stop up your ears, as Odysseus is said to have fled past the song of the sirens, for familiarity with evil writings paves the way for evil deeds. Therefore the soul must be guarded with great care, lest through our love for letters it receive some contamination unawares, as men drink in poison with honey. We shall not praise the poets when they scoff and rail, when they represent fornicators and winebibbers, when they define blissfulness by groaning tables and wanton songs. Least of all shall we listen to them when they tell us of their gods, and especially when they represent them as being many, and not at one among themselves...

Since we must needs attain to the life to come through virtue, our attention is to be chiefly fastened upon those many passages from the poets, from the historians, and especially from the philosophers, in which virtue itself is praised. For it is of no small advantage that virtue become a habit with a youth, for the lessons of youth make a deep impression, because the soul is then plastic, and therefore they are likely to be indelible...
Logged
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.055 seconds with 37 queries.