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Author Topic: Large Migration of Protestants to Orthodoxy ?  (Read 1449 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jude1:3
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« on: January 30, 2014, 06:39:34 PM »

   Now that so many people have the internet and Church History and information is so readily available, do you think Protestants will begin to start converting to Orthodoxy because of the lacking of real Substance in todays modern Protestantism ?

   It's interesting and encouraging how much information I've got from Orthodox Christians about the Septuagint, Church History, and ancient Christian Worship. I really believe that Christians in general are searching for Truth and the right way to worship The Lord. I think many Christians are ignorant of basic Church History and that has a lot to do with it.

   Most Protestant Christians believe in the Apostles' Creed and that is a good starting point I guess to work with. Most people I've talked to believe in *The Virgin Birth, * The Divinity of The Lord Jesus Christ,* The Holy Trinity. Etc.

    I truly wish more Protestant Christians would study Church History.

    One thing I want to mention is that in both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism there are people who love The Lord Jesus Christ 100% and want to follow him, but unfortunately the systems are flawed and most of us are just ignorant to it. Maybe The Holy Spirit is trying to show us The Truth.
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« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2014, 06:45:30 PM »

  Now that so many people have the internet and Church History and information is so readily available, do you think Protestants will begin to start converting to Orthodoxy because of the lacking of real Substance in todays modern Protestantism ?
Just because the information is much more available than ever before doesn't mean that people are suddenly going to start looking for it. Pigs don't know that pigs stink. Likewise, Protestants will never learn how lacking of substance their faith is as long as they continue to be happy where they are.
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« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2014, 06:48:11 PM »

  Now that so many people have the internet and Church History and information is so readily available, do you think Protestants will begin to start converting to Orthodoxy because of the lacking of real Substance in todays modern Protestantism ?
Just because the information is much more available than ever before doesn't mean that people are suddenly going to start looking for it. Pigs don't know that pigs stink. Likewise, Protestants will never learn how lacking of substance their faith is as long as they continue to be happy where they are.


    So do you think they will or won't start to move to Orthodoxy in greater numbers than before ? 
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« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2014, 06:58:19 PM »

  Now that so many people have the internet and Church History and information is so readily available, do you think Protestants will begin to start converting to Orthodoxy because of the lacking of real Substance in todays modern Protestantism ?
Just because the information is much more available than ever before doesn't mean that people are suddenly going to start looking for it. Pigs don't know that pigs stink. Likewise, Protestants will never learn how lacking of substance their faith is as long as they continue to be happy where they are.
  So do you think they will or won't start to move to Orthodoxy in greater numbers than before ? 

What incentive is there?  They would have to recognize that there really is One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church and that what they've believed is, at best, incomplete or, at worst, a lie;  Then to leave it all for the sake of Christ can be a painful process.

 Staying put because one is "happy" is very easy.  Narrow is the road and all that...
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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2014, 07:04:38 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.
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Jude1:3
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« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2014, 07:15:19 PM »

  Now that so many people have the internet and Church History and information is so readily available, do you think Protestants will begin to start converting to Orthodoxy because of the lacking of real Substance in todays modern Protestantism ?
Just because the information is much more available than ever before doesn't mean that people are suddenly going to start looking for it. Pigs don't know that pigs stink. Likewise, Protestants will never learn how lacking of substance their faith is as long as they continue to be happy where they are.
  So do you think they will or won't start to move to Orthodoxy in greater numbers than before ? 

What incentive is there?  They would have to recognize that there really is One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church and that what they've believed is, at best, incomplete or, at worst, a lie;  Then to leave it all for the sake of Christ can be a painful process.

 Staying put because one is "happy" is very easy.  Narrow is the road and all that...


   I understand what you mean. To be perfectly honest I have not been happy for some time in my search for a Church that I actually agree with the doctrines fully. I don't agree with Calvinism or Arminianism and most Churches around here are of those lines like Methodist,Church of The Nazarene, Assemblies of God, Baptist, etc.

   I wish I would of known about Orthodoxy like 20 years ago. I need to speak with a priest and get more information .
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« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2014, 07:15:38 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.



 This is true.
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« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2014, 07:29:01 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.
That, and the Law of Inertia: If someone is heading down the same path he's followed for decades, and this is the only path he knows, then it will take a major life changing event just to get him to see that there's even another path he could be following.
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« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2014, 07:37:08 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.
That, and the Law of Inertia: If someone is heading down the same path he's followed for decades, and this is the only path he knows, then it will take a major life changing event just to get him to see that there's even another path he could be following.


  The saddest part of it all is that I didn't even know what Orthodoxy was until 3 or 4 years ago. Orthodoxy was completely foreign to me, especially growing up in a small town in the midwest. I hope you guys will show Protestant Christian Inquirers Grace in this respect, because most of us are just ignorant of this information in general.
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« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2014, 07:54:42 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.
That, and the Law of Inertia: If someone is heading down the same path he's followed for decades, and this is the only path he knows, then it will take a major life changing event just to get him to see that there's even another path he could be following.

Indeed. I didn't know before that Rome and Orthodoxy had such exclusive claims about themselves, so I never would have seriously considered them in the past.
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« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2014, 08:26:53 PM »

Is there a Church that is not flawed?

 That would make us perfect without need for our saviour Jesus shedding his blood for our sins.

There are none who are not flawed (Romans 3:10)
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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2014, 08:28:54 PM »

Is there a Church that is not flawed?

 That would make us perfect without need for our saviour Jesus shedding his blood for our sins.

There are none who are not flawed (Romans 3:10)
I'm sorry, but, considering the context, I don't understand what you're trying to communicate with this post. Would you please clarify?
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2014, 08:34:47 PM »

The Orthodox Church has flaws just as do the Protestant and Catholic, in response to the original post , last sentence.

The Lord Jesus was often annoyed by the disciples thinking  about which one was better, and he was often dismayed at their inability to understand. That still exists in every Christian Church, and us acting as if we are the owner of the vineyard, is not being very humble in the fact that we need his grace , maybe more than them,  and we are not able to judge where God is not, as written by Orthodox Bishop Ware.(See my faith profile if you are not aware)
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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2014, 08:38:25 PM »

Define 'large' in this  context?

Will thousands of protestants come clamoring at the doors of all the Orthodox Churches worldwide? I don't personally think so.

But in particularly welcoming parishes could not a reasonable amount of people find Orthodoxy and be received into the Church? I would say the answer is most assuredly yes.

At the Parish I am a Cate-quirer in, last year, there were 8 Baptisms and 1 reception by Chrismation.  That does not count infants (there were more of those too!)

In the now -constantly- rolling Catechisis class there are another 5 who are not yet Orthodox. Will we all make it? God Willing, but just the demand to learn more, is there.

But I will say this only works when you have a parish that is friendly, welcomes people, stops to explain things, and so forth.

It doesn't work nearly as well if people are made to feel the wrong ethnicity, or that curiosity is a bad thing and to please go back away already!  

I am very sure that my parish is not alone in the world, that there are many many others that see gentle-welcoming-guiding-being open ministries as a good and valid thing, and not just something that falls to Fathers and Matushkas.  

So I throw down a challenge...next time someone visits your parish, make sure they have a copy of the liturgy booklet if your parish has them...show them where things are right then, and then you can let them follow along.  After things are over, talk to them, make sure that they are introduced to people, if not the Priest or Matushka, a Deacon, a reader....-someone-.  Get the coffee...encourage them, rather than discourage.

If you can't even help lead people to Christ and the Church when they walk though the front door and hand themselves over to you......

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« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2014, 08:43:56 PM »

Define 'large' in this  context?





    I guess I mean more so than in the past so to speak. I don't mean as in a ridiculous amount, but a decent amount of sincere Protestant Christians who just know that there is something more out there to the Christian faith.


    Thank You everyone for all the answers so far.
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« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2014, 08:45:01 PM »

 The saddest part of it all is that I didn't even know what Orthodoxy was until 3 or 4 years ago. Orthodoxy was completely foreign to me, especially growing up in a small town in the midwest. I hope you guys will show Protestant Christian Inquirers Grace in this respect, because most of us are just ignorant of this information in general.

I was in the same boat.  If I would have known, I think I would have made the leap.  Only God knows.  Now that you do know a little more, it's up to you on what to do next.  Seeing a priest would be a good thing.  I think your last sentence is a bit prejudicial, because I have yet to be disrespected by an Orthodox Christian in real life, and I was a tongue-talking, holy-rolling, Bible-only Pentecostal that thought anything remotely liturgical was the Whore of Babylon aka Roman Catholicism.  So, take the time, learn from those who live the faith every day, and choose to commit to Christ always.  This led me to the Church.
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« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2014, 08:46:42 PM »

Define 'large' in this  context?





    I guess I mean more so than in the past so to speak. I don't mean as in a ridiculous amount, but a decent amount of sincere Protestant Christians who just know that there is something more out there to the Christian faith.


    Thank You everyone for all the answers so far.

The Antiochian Archdiocese received several thousand Evangelical Protestants at once in the 1980s.  With God, all things are possible; it could happen again.
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« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2014, 08:49:27 PM »

Define 'large' in this  context?





    I guess I mean more so than in the past so to speak. I don't mean as in a ridiculous amount, but a decent amount of sincere Protestant Christians who just know that there is something more out there to the Christian faith.


    Thank You everyone for all the answers so far.

The Antiochian Archdiocese received several thousand Evangelical Protestants at once in the 1980s.  With God, all things are possible; it could happen again.

And thats why I asked what we were considering large for the discussion...hehe.
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« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2014, 08:57:32 PM »

 The saddest part of it all is that I didn't even know what Orthodoxy was until 3 or 4 years ago. Orthodoxy was completely foreign to me, especially growing up in a small town in the midwest. I hope you guys will show Protestant Christian Inquirers Grace in this respect, because most of us are just ignorant of this information in general.

I was in the same boat.  If I would have known, I think I would have made the leap.  Only God knows.  Now that you do know a little more, it's up to you on what to do next.  Seeing a priest would be a good thing.  I think your last sentence is a bit prejudicial, because I have yet to be disrespected by an Orthodox Christian in real life, and I was a tongue-talking, holy-rolling, Bible-only Pentecostal that thought anything remotely liturgical was the Whore of Babylon aka Roman Catholicism.  So, take the time, learn from those who live the faith every day, and choose to commit to Christ always.  This led me to the Church.

     Absolutely.  I met a guy at the gym who converted to Greek Orthodox and he was super friendly.  I work with many Coptic Orthodox and they are also very friendly.

    Most snootiness and weirdness I've encountered has been from 5 point Calvinists and Charismatic Arminians.
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« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2014, 08:59:31 PM »

Is there a Church that is not flawed?

Quote
Ephesians 5

25 Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, 26 that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, 27 that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish.
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« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2014, 09:07:30 PM »

 mass conversions don't happen as described in the op. they usually have political/economic causes besides stated religious reasons. see the guatemala case. I think, in the modern world it's the only realistic thing to hope for. But I do not see a mass exodus of white suburban evangelicals into orthodoxy anytime soon. the orthodox might have , if they were smart enough to play that card, which I doubt, much more success with more marginal groups , in terms of economic power at least.
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« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2014, 11:53:45 PM »

Denise's church sounds like ours, we've had as many as 10 catachumen from 4 different families my own included, at once in our church during the last year. We also have a lot of people in the inquirer's class and we do a lot of the things that Denise is talking about. But even so it takes God to do the drawing and us to listen. I learned all the stuff that your talking about Jude, but first God put it in my heart that I needed to be totally surrendered to Him, including in what I believed.
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« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2014, 05:41:13 PM »

Is there a Church that is not flawed?

Quote
Ephesians 5

25 Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, 26 that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, 27 that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish.


These verses are speaking about wives. The Church has faults because we are sinners, Just as Peter was a sinner until the end, and he made missteps just as we all do.

Do you say that there has never been a mistake by the Church, or that others believe theirs is also superior to yours, these are all sins, God is the only one capable of judging where he is.

This is a Commentary from Matthew Henry's concise for the above verses.
The duty of wives is, submission to their husbands in the Lord, which includes honouring and obeying them, from a principle of love to them. The duty of husbands is to love their wives. The love of Christ to the church is an example, which is sincere, pure, and constant, notwithstanding her failures. Christ gave himself for the church, that he might sanctify it in this world, and glorify it in the next, that he might bestow on all his members a principle of holiness, and deliver them from the guilt, the pollution, and the dominion of sin, by those influences of the Holy Spirit, of which baptismal water was the outward sign. The church and believers will not be without spot or wrinkle till they come to glory.
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« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2014, 05:55:28 PM »

These verses are speaking about wives. The Church has faults because we are sinners, Just as Peter was a sinner until the end, and he made missteps just as we all do.

Do you say that there has never been a mistake by the Church, or that others believe theirs is also superior to yours, these are all sins, God is the only one capable of judging where he is.

In speaking about husbands and wives, St Paul refers to Christ and the Church.  What he says about the latter is the basis for what he says about the former.  So no, it's not just about wives. 

And what St Paul says is that Christ, through his Passion and through the cleansing effected by the washing of water with the word, has made the Church to be without spot or wrinkle or blemish, but holy.  All of those things are true of the Church here and now because Christ has united himself to his bride (the Church), he has become one flesh with her such that we can speak of him as our head and we his members.  Individuals join the Church, and individuals can fall away from the Church, and while they are members individuals can be imperfect, sinful, etc.  But it is wrong to say "the Church has faults" unless you specify exactly what you mean. 

Quote
This is a Commentary from Matthew Henry's concise for the above verses.
The duty of wives is, submission to their husbands in the Lord, which includes honouring and obeying them, from a principle of love to them. The duty of husbands is to love their wives. The love of Christ to the church is an example, which is sincere, pure, and constant, notwithstanding her failures. Christ gave himself for the church, that he might sanctify it in this world, and glorify it in the next, that he might bestow on all his members a principle of holiness, and deliver them from the guilt, the pollution, and the dominion of sin, by those influences of the Holy Spirit, of which baptismal water was the outward sign. The church and believers will not be without spot or wrinkle till they come to glory.

Again, this can be appropriate if it is properly qualified.  But it can also be heretical and contrary to the teaching of the Orthodox Church.  What's the likelihood that Matthew Henry is interpreting this in an Orthodox manner? 
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« Reply #24 on: January 31, 2014, 06:13:26 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.

 Right on the money.  Along with what PtA said about a general ignorance of Orthodoxy, people's raising has a LOT to do with their beliefs.  For example, my wife was adopted and raised Lutheran.  Now, she loves Orthodoxy and attends church with me, but she's extremely hesitant to leave Lutheranism (even though she doesn't attend their services any longer).  To her way of thinking, if she were to leave Lutheranism, in a way, she feels she'd be turning her back on her parents who've given her everything, including a new life here in the States.  So, yes, it's ignorance of Orthodoxy, but it's much more about identity and emotion, IMHO.
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« Reply #25 on: January 31, 2014, 06:28:28 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0WY9iBKs4M

this is one time (1980s) when a lot of people came into the orthodox church.
beautiful story.
 Smiley
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« Reply #26 on: January 31, 2014, 06:30:23 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0WY9iBKs4M

this is one time (1980s) when a lot of people came into the orthodox church.
beautiful story.
 Smiley

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« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2014, 07:16:59 PM »

I almost born orthodox christian, they baptized me when I was 1,5 month.
In Greece we only had
- some Jehovah's Witnesses (I know some and I like a person) and it was forbidden in past.
- some muslims who were here always and stay here after the Treaty of Lausanne

the others are very small numbers to talk about

To be honest all these different protestant churches in USA looks funny to me. I don't understand them.

But with internet I try to understand as many religions I can and their belief. I don't want to change religion but I want to learn for other religions.

I already know many things about Amish and to be honest I am really sure that almost nobody know about them in Greece.

So,internet is a good place to search about religion if you want. To understand some things to see the difference and to convert if you really want and search the truth.

And you are good. I don't say "we" because I don't think that greek orthodox people from Greece are good to convert others. We can't handle it. Proselytize is forbidden in Greece and we have no idea about all these churches

Keep the good work and make many orthodox youtube videos

Smiley

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« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2014, 08:26:14 PM »

mass conversions don't happen as described in the op. they usually have political/economic causes besides stated religious reasons
LOL. And where did you get that idea from?
Atheism is the opiate of the dissolute.
But I do not see a mass exodus of white suburban evangelicals into orthodoxy anytime soon.

Face it: you don't want to see it either.
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« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2014, 08:27:45 PM »

Most Protestants are Protestants for the same reason that most Orthodox are Orthodox - it is the Christian tradition that they are born in and have their identity rooted in.
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« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2014, 08:28:28 PM »

Is there a Church that is not flawed?

 That would make us perfect without need for our saviour Jesus shedding his blood for our sins.

There are none who are not flawed (Romans 3:10)
We are talking about the Church, not us.
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« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2014, 08:39:52 PM »

Yes, there are more people coming to Orthodoxy. I know many that have come through discussions they've had on the internet. We've had people that were interested on homeschool boards and slowly made their way into the church after many conversations. I was following my husband into the Church and my greatest support and source of information was a small group of Orthodox online that were able to also send me to online sources for learning. As we were converting, I found that a handful of other Calvinists I knew from online were also quietly converting or looking at Orthodoxy with the possibility of converting. One of these gentlemen had his entire Protestant parish convert. Yes, the internet is helping.
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« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2014, 08:42:11 PM »

Yes, there are more people coming to Orthodoxy. I know many that have come through discussions they've had on the internet. We've had people that were interested on homeschool boards and slowly made their way into the church after many conversations. I was following my husband into the Church and my greatest support and source of information was a small group of Orthodox online that were able to also send me to online sources for learning. As we were converting, I found that a handful of other Calvinists I knew from online were also quietly converting or looking at Orthodoxy with the possibility of converting. One of these gentlemen had his entire Protestant parish convert. Yes, the internet is helping.
welcome aboard.
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« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2014, 01:34:52 AM »

Greater access to information has not improved the overall IQ or quality of work from the average student.  As an educator, I can speak to that.  Plus, there was a massive reception of former Evangelicals into the Antiochian archdiocese many years ago, long before the advent of the internet as we know it.  We have yet to see anything like that since then, at least in this country.  I'm sure the internet has helped, but it is not the catalyst you think it would be. 

There is no doubt that many Protestants who are disaffected with their current tradition are looking outside theirs for answers, but are doing so in a way which is syncretic, i.e. they blend what is good with theirs with what is good from another tradition. If Protestants do come over to the Orthodox Church, there is a great tendency (and I have personally seen this many times) to bring over their Protestantism with them and "Orthodoxize" it.  They won't embrace Orthodoxy for the totality that it is and insist that some things typical of Protestants should exist alongside of the Orthodox tradition which they join.  And that will only cause confusion and chaos.

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« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2014, 04:01:00 AM »

Sure conversions are on the up

and I am sure "ex-Orthodox" is on the up too for the past hundred years ("Ex-Orthodox, as in, no longer practicing)

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« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2014, 09:37:07 AM »

I have no idea of whether Protestants are converting in droves or just a trickle, but Im most concerned about is the 'baggage' they may bring because Orthodoxy requires, in some cases, a different belief system.
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« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2014, 10:35:21 AM »


There is no doubt that many Protestants who are disaffected with their current tradition are looking outside theirs for answers, but are doing so in a way which is syncretic, i.e. they blend what is good with theirs with what is good from another tradition. If Protestants do come over to the Orthodox Church, there is a great tendency (and I have personally seen this many times) to bring over their Protestantism with them and "Orthodoxize" it.  They won't embrace Orthodoxy for the totality that it is and insist that some things typical of Protestants should exist alongside of the Orthodox tradition which they join.  And that will only cause confusion and chaos.
What kinds of "some things" are you talking about? And is it a matter of "won't embrace Orthodoxy for the totality that it is" or just that it takes time and sometimes people don't even know that they're still clinging to something. 
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« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2014, 10:54:42 AM »

There is no doubt that many Protestants who are disaffected with their current tradition are looking outside theirs for answers, but are doing so in a way which is syncretic, i.e. they blend what is good with theirs with what is good from another tradition.

As a member of a Protestant church and graduate of a denominational college, I have definitely observed this . . .  I've done a number of book studies in my congregation where authors are encouraging an exploration and appropriation of practices, teachings, ideas from the vast history of Christianity. Usually there is some sort of warning but really it seems left to your own judgement as to what is worthy and what should be avoided. Of course, they wouldn't use the syncretic which to them might imply to great a gulf between separate traditions which they are not willing to admit.
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« Reply #38 on: February 01, 2014, 02:17:39 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.
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« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2014, 02:48:23 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.

The baggage that may be referenced here is the 'sola scriptural' baggage.
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« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2014, 02:50:58 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.

The baggage that may be referenced here is the 'sola scriptural' baggage.

Protestants are most welcome to investigate and embrace the Orthodox Faith.  We have a few converts ourselves in my parish, and they attend Bible classes with tend to enhance their understanding of Orthodox and how we interpret the Bible.
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« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2014, 02:51:40 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.

The baggage that may be referenced here is the 'sola scriptural' baggage.

The converts I know, converted after that brick wall fell. That brick wall is the barrier to accepting many other things. I know of none that bring it with them...that would make absolutely no sense.
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« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2014, 02:54:50 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.

The baggage that may be referenced here is the 'sola scriptural' baggage.

The converts I know, converted after that brick wall fell. That brick wall is the barrier to accepting many other things. I know of none that bring it with them...that would make absolutely no sense.

Well, that's good.
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« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2014, 05:12:26 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.

The baggage that may be referenced here is the 'sola scriptural' baggage.

The converts I know, converted after that brick wall fell. That brick wall is the barrier to accepting many other things. I know of none that bring it with them...that would make absolutely no sense.
I'm aware, though, of other pieces of baggage Protestants bring with them into the Orthodox Church. It may not be as big as sola scriptura, but it's big enough to be a problem. I embraced the Orthodox Faith as a convert from Wesleyan Protestantism about 17 years ago, yet I still find that there are some Protestant ways of thinking that I haven't quite shaken off.
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« Reply #44 on: February 01, 2014, 05:18:35 PM »

I'm grateful that ancient Orthodox weren't rejecting pagan converts over concerns of "oh, they MIGHT want to blend some of their past baggage!" It's a really sad attitude of rejection I'm seeing on this thread.
I'm honestly not seeing any attitude of rejection. I am seeing the honest statement that once a Protestant embraces the Faith, he can no longer expect that he will be allowed to keep a hold on his Protestant ways of thinking without being challenged to drop them. The Orthodox Way does expect each adherent to experience transformation, which converts realize especially to be true. This transformation requires the shedding of baggage, of old ways of thinking and of viewing the world, in order to receive the new wine of the Orthodox Faith.

In a way, I see this as part of Christ's consistent message to repent. To follow Christ, one must repent. If a person is unwilling to repent, to cast aside all baggage received in his/her life prior to following Christ, then one cannot become a follower of Christ. This isn't an immediate process, but it's a process we must all choose daily to undergo.
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