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Author Topic: Networking issues: Two "home" networks - how to fix this?  (Read 331 times) Average Rating: 0
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dzheremi
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« on: January 18, 2014, 03:13:15 PM »

If anybody out there is knowledgeable about home networking issues, I'd really appreciate your help.

I moved into a new apartment about a month ago, got internet set up through Comcast to make sure they'd have the service turned on when I lugged all my equipment into the new place (of course they didn't actually do that until after I had to call a Comcast installer out there to the tune of $50, but anyway), only to have it go down about three days later. Then I had to go out of state for a while without having it fixed first. I just returned last night and 'fixed' it myself, to whatever extent unplugging something and pressing a button can be called fixing something. I am using their provided router to connect the desktop via ethernet cable.

The problem is that while my desktop is working fine now, my laptop apparently still thinks it's at my old apartment (just as it did for the brief period when the internet was sort of working on the desktop, before I had to travel out of state). It is set to the network I had set up at my previous residence (which worked fine there), and does not recognize the setup done by the Comcast guy. The weird thing is that while they are now both on different 'home' networks (with different IPv4 addresses, so it's apparently not just a matter of renaming the laptop network to match the generic "Network 4" setup by Comcast and then having the desktop search for it, as several sites suggested), the laptop (a Dell running Windows 7)  still says it has an excellent strength signal, despite not actually being able to connect to the internet.

What can/should I do about this? Is it as simple as trying to release and renew the IP address on the laptop? That's what another site recommended trying, but it didn't help the situation.

Oh, and neither command prompt lists either connection as DHCP enabled, if that helps. I don't know how to do that.

Please, if anyone can help, I'd be really grateful. I don't even know what any of the above means (or if it's the right info to give to fix the problem), I just know that everything was working fine at the old place and now it's not, but neither network seems to have gone away...they just sort of exist, side by side, and only one of them can connect to the internet.

Thanks in advance for any advice. Smiley

« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 03:13:43 PM by dzheremi » Logged

IoanC
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2014, 03:45:15 PM »

Did the guy configure anything on your laptop? If he didn't, then:

Assuming the router is set to DHCP, like you said, you need to make sure the laptop is set to automatic. Control Panel -- under Network and Internet select View...Status... -- on the left, Change Adapter Setting -- right click your Network and select Properties -- for both TCP/IP v4 and v6 select their properties and set Obtain Address and Obtain DNS to automatic. If you don't know if it's set to DHCP you can still try because you can't hurt anything.
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dzheremi
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2014, 03:59:58 PM »

Thank you, but neither are set to DCHP. Sorry if that wasn't clear. Does that change how to go about fixing this?

(And the Comcast guy did not do anything to the laptop, no.)
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IoanC
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2014, 04:13:40 PM »

Using the steps that I provided before, have a look at your PC and let me know what it looks like for TCP/IP, v4 and v6 (if you are comfortable sharing this info). You will need to set up a static IP manually on your laptop, but that can't be done unless you see what your addresses look like the way the guy configured them.

By the way, were you using common network folders between your PC and laptop? Because if I understood you correctly that "Network 4" is something else and gets assigned by every computer, and doesn't have to be the same on every computer even though it may happen to be.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 04:14:38 PM by IoanC » Logged

WPM
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2014, 04:14:07 PM »

I set up my internet connection at the Tech Shop with professional Antivirus for $200 dollars.
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2014, 04:24:50 PM »

If anybody out there is knowledgeable about home networking issues, I'd really appreciate your help.

I moved into a new apartment about a month ago, got internet set up through Comcast to make sure they'd have the service turned on when I lugged all my equipment into the new place (of course they didn't actually do that until after I had to call a Comcast installer out there to the tune of $50, but anyway), only to have it go down about three days later. Then I had to go out of state for a while without having it fixed first. I just returned last night and 'fixed' it myself, to whatever extent unplugging something and pressing a button can be called fixing something. I am using their provided router to connect the desktop via ethernet cable.

The problem is that while my desktop is working fine now, my laptop apparently still thinks it's at my old apartment (just as it did for the brief period when the internet was sort of working on the desktop, before I had to travel out of state). It is set to the network I had set up at my previous residence (which worked fine there), and does not recognize the setup done by the Comcast guy. The weird thing is that while they are now both on different 'home' networks (with different IPv4 addresses, so it's apparently not just a matter of renaming the laptop network to match the generic "Network 4" setup by Comcast and then having the desktop search for it, as several sites suggested), the laptop (a Dell running Windows 7)  still says it has an excellent strength signal, despite not actually being able to connect to the internet.

What can/should I do about this? Is it as simple as trying to release and renew the IP address on the laptop? That's what another site recommended trying, but it didn't help the situation.

Oh, and neither command prompt lists either connection as DHCP enabled, if that helps. I don't know how to do that.

Please, if anyone can help, I'd be really grateful. I don't even know what any of the above means (or if it's the right info to give to fix the problem), I just know that everything was working fine at the old place and now it's not, but neither network seems to have gone away...they just sort of exist, side by side, and only one of them can connect to the internet.

Thanks in advance for any advice. Smiley


Contact Tech Support at the local computer store.
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orthonorm
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2014, 04:48:08 PM »

If anybody out there is knowledgeable about home networking issues, I'd really appreciate your help.

I moved into a new apartment about a month ago, got internet set up through Comcast to make sure they'd have the service turned on when I lugged all my equipment into the new place (of course they didn't actually do that until after I had to call a Comcast installer out there to the tune of $50, but anyway), only to have it go down about three days later. Then I had to go out of state for a while without having it fixed first. I just returned last night and 'fixed' it myself, to whatever extent unplugging something and pressing a button can be called fixing something. I am using their provided router to connect the desktop via ethernet cable.

The problem is that while my desktop is working fine now, my laptop apparently still thinks it's at my old apartment (just as it did for the brief period when the internet was sort of working on the desktop, before I had to travel out of state). It is set to the network I had set up at my previous residence (which worked fine there), and does not recognize the setup done by the Comcast guy. The weird thing is that while they are now both on different 'home' networks (with different IPv4 addresses, so it's apparently not just a matter of renaming the laptop network to match the generic "Network 4" setup by Comcast and then having the desktop search for it, as several sites suggested), the laptop (a Dell running Windows 7)  still says it has an excellent strength signal, despite not actually being able to connect to the internet.

What can/should I do about this? Is it as simple as trying to release and renew the IP address on the laptop? That's what another site recommended trying, but it didn't help the situation.

Oh, and neither command prompt lists either connection as DHCP enabled, if that helps. I don't know how to do that.

Please, if anyone can help, I'd be really grateful. I don't even know what any of the above means (or if it's the right info to give to fix the problem), I just know that everything was working fine at the old place and now it's not, but neither network seems to have gone away...they just sort of exist, side by side, and only one of them can connect to the internet.

Thanks in advance for any advice. Smiley



I hope someone with more time is able to jump in.

If you get it to work, please let us know.

First question:

Let's get clear about your set up.

1 cable modem (is it also a wireless router?)
1 Windows 7 desktop you have working via an ethernet cable to the modem possible router
1 Laptop (you connecting wirelessly?) using operating system?

Let'g get clear about what you have done:

Have you deleted all your former network profiles (whichever you are no longer going to lose which seem to be confusing your laptop)?
Have you reset the modem and router, if so how? (Really it would be good to know if you are using a cable modem and your own router)

Really, this shouldn't be difficult just tedious possibly.


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dzheremi
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2014, 05:49:02 PM »


I hope someone with more time is able to jump in.

If you get it to work, please let us know.

First question:

Let's get clear about your set up.

1 cable modem (is it also a wireless router?)

Yes, one cable modem. No, it is not a wireless router. My router is a Netgear Wireless-N 150.

Quote
1 Windows 7 desktop you have working via an ethernet cable to the modem possible router

Yes.

Quote
1 Laptop (you connecting wirelessly?) using operating system?

Windows 7, trying to connect wirelessly.

Quote
Have you deleted all your former network profiles (whichever you are no longer going to lose which seem to be confusing your laptop)?

All the ones it would let me delete, yes. In addition to the generic 'Network 4' set up by the Comcast guy, it says there's a 'Network 3' that's in use (don't know what it's doing, but since it says it's in use, I'm not allowed to delete it). On the laptop, there is only the one network profile, which is just "Jeremy-Laptop Network".

Quote
Have you reset the modem and router, if so how? (Really it would be good to know if you are using a cable modem and your own router)

The router is mine; the modem is not. I had to reset the modem to get the desktop to work last night. It was just a matter of pressing a button to reset it. I haven't done anything to the router, since I wasn't sure where exactly the problem lies, and I don't want to make it worse by messing with things when I don't know what I'm doing.

Quote
Really, this shouldn't be difficult just tedious possibly.

Yes, that how it seems.

Thank you for your willingness to help.
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Opus118
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 06:58:26 PM »


I hope someone with more time is able to jump in.

If you get it to work, please let us know.

First question:

Let's get clear about your set up.

1 cable modem (is it also a wireless router?)

Yes, one cable modem. No, it is not a wireless router. My router is a Netgear Wireless-N 150.

Quote
1 Windows 7 desktop you have working via an ethernet cable to the modem possible router

Yes.

Quote
1 Laptop (you connecting wirelessly?) using operating system?

Windows 7, trying to connect wirelessly.

Quote
Have you deleted all your former network profiles (whichever you are no longer going to lose which seem to be confusing your laptop)?

All the ones it would let me delete, yes. In addition to the generic 'Network 4' set up by the Comcast guy, it says there's a 'Network 3' that's in use (don't know what it's doing, but since it says it's in use, I'm not allowed to delete it). On the laptop, there is only the one network profile, which is just "Jeremy-Laptop Network".

Quote
Have you reset the modem and router, if so how? (Really it would be good to know if you are using a cable modem and your own router)

The router is mine; the modem is not. I had to reset the modem to get the desktop to work last night. It was just a matter of pressing a button to reset it. I haven't done anything to the router, since I wasn't sure where exactly the problem lies, and I don't want to make it worse by messing with things when I don't know what I'm doing.

Quote
Really, this shouldn't be difficult just tedious possibly.

Yes, that how it seems.

Thank you for your willingness to help.

I have three questions.

Did you go to Network and Sharing Center in the Control Panel and try Setup a New Connection or Network?

Did you try unpluging the ethernet cable going from the desktop to the wireless router and plugging it in to your laptop instead?

Do you have the manual for the router? It is online.
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SolEX01
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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2014, 08:12:21 PM »

Bring up a command prompt:

Click on Start Menu -> Run -> type cmd

Type:

ipconfig /all

Look for any reference to Network 4:

If one exists, type:

ipconfig /release "<anything containing Network 4>"

Connect to the router in Network and Sharing Center



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orthonorm
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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2014, 08:17:19 PM »

OK, I'll stop till you do all of the above and you seem to come to a standstill. Too many cook spoil the broth.
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Opus118
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« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2014, 01:23:12 AM »

OK, I'll stop till you do all of the above and you seem to come to a standstill. Too many cook spoil the broth.

Don't. Yes, I can make an avgolemono soup by myself but it is a lot easier with someone else ladling in the broth little by little while I beat the eggs.
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dzheremi
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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2014, 04:21:51 AM »

Sorry to leave this thread hanging. I tried a few more of this thread's suggestions and they didn't work, so I bit the bullet and e-mailed a friend in California who installs computer and phone network systems for a living and had him talk me through how to fix it. Orthonorm was right; it wasn't difficult to fix, just tedious. It turns out the Comcast guy messed things up when he was originally getting the service set up (not terribly surprising to me, given my past interaction with Comcast), but everything is working fine now. Once again, thank you all for your help and suggestions.
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orthonorm
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« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2014, 12:04:44 PM »

Sorry to leave this thread hanging. I tried a few more of this thread's suggestions and they didn't work, so I bit the bullet and e-mailed a friend in California who installs computer and phone network systems for a living and had him talk me through how to fix it. Orthonorm was right; it wasn't difficult to fix, just tedious. It turns out the Comcast guy messed things up when he was originally getting the service set up (not terribly surprising to me, given my past interaction with Comcast), but everything is working fine now. Once again, thank you all for your help and suggestions.

Good. I figured the problem was either in your modem settings or that your router had to be properly refreshed.

If I can make a modest suggestion to improve your service and lower your cost after about a year, buy your own cable modem.
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Velsigne
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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2014, 12:34:07 PM »

Comcast gives free complete 360 Norton with internet service.

Seems it's a little known perk according to the IT guy at work.
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