Author Topic: Early Church Fathers  (Read 146137 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #540 on: March 16, 2018, 11:45:37 AM »
Asteriktos, someone on FB mentioned that St. John Chrysostom once said that Christianity was the ultimate philosophy...but I can't find anything where he said such a bizarre thing. Do you know of a quote that might come close? Thanks.

I don't know about those exactly words--'ultimate philosophy'--but St. John does call Christian philosophy things like 'true,' 'highest,' and 'heavenly,' and sees it as superior to the pagan philosophies (by philosophy he means both beliefs and the living out of those beliefs). No quote came to me off the top of my head so I did a search, and these are the ones which seemed to come closest to what you are asking about:

"These are our philosophers, and theirs the best philosophy, exhibiting their virtue not by their outward appearance, but by their mind. The pagan philosophers are in character no wise better than those who are engaged on the stage, and in the sports of actors; and they have nothing to shew beyond the threadbare cloak, the beard, and the long robe! But these, quite on the contrary, bidding farewell to staff and beard, and the other accoutrements, have their souls adorned with the doctrines of the true philosophy, and not only with the doctrines, but also with the real practice." (Homilies on the Statues 19.3)

"For if a set of Greeks, men worthless as they are, and dogs, by taking up that worthless philosophy of theirs, (for such the Grecian philosophy is,) or rather not itself but only its mere name, and wearing the threadbare cloak, and letting their hair grow, impress many; how much more will he who is a true philosopher? If a false appearance, if a mere shadow of philosophy at first sight so catches us, what if we should love the true and pure philosophy?" (Homily 21 on Ephesians)

"But the virgin has striven for nobler aims, and eagerly sought the highest kind of philosophy, and professes to exhibit upon earth the life which angels lead, and while yet in the flesh proposes to do deeds which belong to the incorporeal powers." (Treatise on the Priesthood 3.17)

Offline Iconodule

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #541 on: March 16, 2018, 12:10:55 PM »
Asteriktos, someone on FB mentioned that St. John Chrysostom once said that Christianity was the ultimate philosophy...but I can't find anything where he said such a bizarrecharacteristic thing. Do you know of a quote that might come close? Thanks.

I'd have to agree. If Christ is Wisdom than Christianity must be the greatest love of such wisdom. I'm encountered several places where fathers refer to Christianity or Christian ascetic practice as philosophy.
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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #542 on: March 17, 2018, 11:18:11 AM »
A quiet soul makes room for words of wisdom, for the Lord will guide the meek in judgment, (Ps. 24:9) or rather, in discretion.

Simplicity is a constant habit of soul that has become immune to evil thinking.

Innocent is he whose soul is in its natural purity as it was created, and who makes intercession for all.

-- St. John Climacus (d. 649), Ladder of Divine Ascent 24.10, 14, 19

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #543 on: March 17, 2018, 04:21:08 PM »
...we thought to arrange that no one whatsoever should be denied the opportunity to give his heart to the observance of the Christian religion, of that religion which he should think best for himself... When you see that this has been granted to them by us, your Worship will know that we have also conceded to other religions the right of open and free observance of their worship for the sake of the peace of our times, that each one may have the free opportunity to worship as he pleases; this regulation is made we that we may not seem to detract from any dignity or any religion...

-- Edict of Milan (313)


My own desire is, for the common good of the world and the advantage of all mankind, that your people should enjoy a life of peace and undisturbed concord. Let those, therefore, who still delight in error, be made welcome to the same degree of peace and tranquillity which they have who believe. For it may be that this restoration of equal privileges to all will prevail to lead them into the straight path. Let no one molest another, but let every one do as his soul desires.... Let no one use what he has received by inner conviction as a means to harm his neighbor. What each has seen and understood, he must use, if possible, to help the other; but if that is impossible, the matter should be dropped. It is one thing to take on willingly the contest for immortality, quite another to enforce it with sanctions.

-- St. Emperor Constantine (d. 337), Life of Constantine 2.56, 60

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #544 on: March 18, 2018, 11:42:21 PM »
Salute also Mary my daughter, distinguished both for gravity and erudition, as also the Church which is in her house. (Col. 4:15) May my soul be in place of hers: she is the very pattern of pious women.

-- Pseudo-Ignatius (5th century), Letter to Hero the Deacon of Antioch

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #545 on: March 19, 2018, 03:17:20 AM »
However, not only is the flesh of the lamb not to be eaten raw, it is not to be cooked in water either. (Ex. 12:9) Now what does water here signify, if not human thinking, of the sort described through Solomon, who says, speaking of heretics: "Stolen waters are sweeter" (Prov. 9:17)? Thus our Redeemer must neither be considered to be only a man, nor, when we ask in what way God was able to become man, is he to be reflected on through purely human thinking. Everyone, indeed, who believes our Redeemer to be simply a man, does nothing other than eat the flesh of the lamb raw, and refuses to cook it, as it were, by understanding his divinity. Everyone, on the other hand, who attempts to discuss the mystery of his becoming man, through purely human thought, is trying to cook the flesh of the lamb in water. That is, he is trying to penetrate the mystery of this divine process by the kind of thought which, like boiling, dissolves what it cooks. The person, therefore, who wishes to celebrate the joy of Easter with due solemnity, eats the flesh roasted by fire (Ex. 12:8). In this way he may come to understand how everything is ordered, not through human thought, but through the burning power of the Holy Spirit.

Concerning this mystery, the text adds, "You shall devour the head, with the feet and the intestines." (Ex. 12:9) For our Redeemer is the Alpha and the Omega, that is, he is God from before all ages and now, at the end of time, he is also man. And as we have already said, dear friends, we learn through the testimony of Paul that "the head of Christ is God" (1 Cor. 11:3). Therefore, to devour the head of the lamb is to accept his divinity, through faith. To devour the feet, however, means to follow in the tracks of his humanity, by loving and imitating him. But what are the intestines? Surely they are the hidden and spiritual commands contained in his words. These we devour when we avidly consume the words of life. Does this term "devouring" rebuke our apathy and laziness? For we do not inquire into his words and mysteries ourselves, and we are reluctant to listen to his teachings from others.

"None of it shall remain till the morning" (Ex. 12:11). That is, we are to study his teaching assiduously until the day of the Resurrection dawns. In the night of this present life, we are to enter into all his commandments, by understanding them and by following them. But since it is extremely difficult to understand every sacred word, and to penetrate every one of his mysteries, the text adds: "If anything is left over, it is burnt on the first" (Ex. 12:11). We burn what is left of hte lamb when we humbly entrust to the power of the Holy Spirit whatever we cannot understand about the mystery of Christ becoming man. Thus whoever hears this mystery proclaimed will not arrogantly despise or reject what he does not understand. Instead he will cast it into the fire by entrusting it to the Holy Spirit.

-- St. Gregory the Dialogist (d. 604), Homilies on the Gospels 22
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 03:23:46 AM by Asteriktos »

Offline Volnutt

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #546 on: March 19, 2018, 03:30:38 AM »
Salute also Mary my daughter, distinguished both for gravity and erudition, as also the Church which is in her house. (Col. 4:15) May my soul be in place of hers: she is the very pattern of pious women.

-- Pseudo-Ignatius (5th century), Letter to Hero the Deacon of Antioch

I don't get "May my soul be in place of hers"
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #547 on: March 19, 2018, 03:54:44 AM »
Salute also Mary my daughter, distinguished both for gravity and erudition, as also the Church which is in her house. (Col. 4:15) May my soul be in place of hers: she is the very pattern of pious women.

-- Pseudo-Ignatius (5th century), Letter to Hero the Deacon of Antioch

I don't get "May my soul be in place of hers"

This is just speculation, but I wondered if it was a kind of idiom along the lines of "someone after my own heart"? I'm basing this partly on the above passage, and also on another passage in which Pseudo-Ignatius used the same phrase:

"I salute the holy presbytery. I salute the sacred deacons, and that person most dear to me, whom may I behold, through the Holy Spirit, occupying my place [as bishop] when I shall attain to Christ [through martyrdom]. My soul be in place of his." (Epistle to the Antiochians 12; bracketed words added by me)

Both times he is talking about someone he respects and seems to feel spiritual kinship towards.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 03:56:00 AM by Asteriktos »

Offline Volnutt

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #548 on: March 19, 2018, 04:13:30 AM »
Huh. Maybe.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #549 on: March 19, 2018, 04:45:44 AM »
Salute also Mary my daughter, distinguished both for gravity and erudition, as also the Church which is in her house. (Col. 4:15) May my soul be in place of hers: she is the very pattern of pious women.

-- Pseudo-Ignatius (5th century), Letter to Hero the Deacon of Antioch

I don't get "May my soul be in place of hers"

This is just speculation, but I wondered if it was a kind of idiom along the lines of "someone after my own heart"? I'm basing this partly on the above passage, and also on another passage in which Pseudo-Ignatius used the same phrase:

"I salute the holy presbytery. I salute the sacred deacons, and that person most dear to me, whom may I behold, through the Holy Spirit, occupying my place [as bishop] when I shall attain to Christ [through martyrdom]. My soul be in place of his." (Epistle to the Antiochians 12; bracketed words added by me)

Both times he is talking about someone he respects and seems to feel spiritual kinship towards.

I figured it was an expression of praise and personal humility and meant something akin to "May I receive their [same] reward."
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 04:48:00 AM by Hawkeye »
"Take heed, you who listen to me: Our misfortune is inevitable, we cannot escape it. If God allows scandals, it is that the elect shall be revealed. Let them be burned, let them be purified, let them who have been tried be made manifest among you."   - The Life of the Archpriest Avvakum by Himself

Offline Volnutt

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #550 on: March 19, 2018, 06:05:08 AM »
Salute also Mary my daughter, distinguished both for gravity and erudition, as also the Church which is in her house. (Col. 4:15) May my soul be in place of hers: she is the very pattern of pious women.

-- Pseudo-Ignatius (5th century), Letter to Hero the Deacon of Antioch

I don't get "May my soul be in place of hers"

This is just speculation, but I wondered if it was a kind of idiom along the lines of "someone after my own heart"? I'm basing this partly on the above passage, and also on another passage in which Pseudo-Ignatius used the same phrase:

"I salute the holy presbytery. I salute the sacred deacons, and that person most dear to me, whom may I behold, through the Holy Spirit, occupying my place [as bishop] when I shall attain to Christ [through martyrdom]. My soul be in place of his." (Epistle to the Antiochians 12; bracketed words added by me)

Both times he is talking about someone he respects and seems to feel spiritual kinship towards.

I figured it was an expression of praise and personal humility and meant something akin to "May I receive their [same] reward."

Sounds plausible.

Or maybe, "If they wind up in Hell, may their punishment be given to me instead."
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #551 on: March 19, 2018, 09:24:20 AM »
Yeah, either of those as well could be it. Don't know if it'd be any clearer what is meant in the original Greek.

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #552 on: March 19, 2018, 06:46:05 PM »
Gregory was especially concerned with leadership and education. He made sure that each church had a priest and each region had a bishop. Then he persuaded the king to gather peasant children from all over the country so that they, too, might learn from him and the men he had chosen. The king was willing also to have some children taught to read and become better acquainted with the Scriptures and other sacred writings. Some learned Syriac and some Greek, but all found new and precious knowledge in the word of God. So Gregory's work continued. He spread the gospel message everywhere; he helped many in distress and despair, and established monastic orders in the populous plains and the isolated mountain caves. He educated many of the pagan priests' children and when they were ready he made them bishops of the Church.

The first of these, Albianos, was often left in charge of the court so that Gregory could retreat to a lonely place and live austerely with pupils from the monasteries. They would give themselves to prayer and works of humility, proclaiming god's strength by their own weakness. They did the worship services together, studied the Bible, sang spiritual songs, and encouraged each other to live according to God's way rather than the world's. But Gregory was always ready to visit a city to work with the people in churches there, and met often with priests and bishops. He was their best example of how to live and do their work as the Lord would want, and constantly reminded them to teach others as Christ had done.

-- said of: St. Gregory the Illuminator (d. 331), History of St. Gregory and the Conversion of Armenia by Agathangelos

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #553 on: March 20, 2018, 03:57:14 PM »
Now the ways of wisdom are various that lead right to the way of truth. Faith is the way... But faith, which the Greeks disparage, deeming it futile and barbarous, is a voluntary preconception, the assent of piety— the subject of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen, according to the divine apostle. (Heb. 11:1)... But we, who have heard by the Scriptures that self-determining choice and refusal have been given by the Lord to men, rest in the infallible criterion of faith, manifesting a willing spirit, since we have chosen life and believe God through His voice. And he who has believed the Word knows the matter to be true; for the Word is truth. But he who has disbelieved Him that speaks, has disbelieved God. "By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that what is seen was not made of things which appear," says the apostle. "By faith Abel offered to God a fuller sacrifice than Cain, by which he received testimony that he was righteous, God giving testimony to him respecting his gifts; and by it he, being dead, yet speaks," and so forth, down to "than enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season." (Heb. 11:3-25) Faith having, therefore, justified these before the law, made them heirs of the divine promise. Why then should I review and adduce any further testimonies of faith from the history in our hands? "For the time would fail me were I to tell of Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephtha, David, and Samuel, and the prophets," and what follows (Heb. 11:32)

-- Clement of Alexandria (d. 215), The Stromata 2.2, 4

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #554 on: March 21, 2018, 06:30:31 PM »
"And Jesus called a little child unto him, and set him in the midst of them" (Matt. 18:2). He may have set a small child in their midst simply in order to make an inquiry about its age and to demonstrate an image of innocence (St. Hilary); or at least he did this to give them an example of humility, namely, that of himself, who had come not to be served but to serve (Matt. 20:28). Others (Origen) interpret the child as the Holy Spirit, whom he put into the hearts of the disciples that they might exchange their arrogance with humility.

"Amen I say to you: Unless you are converted so that you become as little children, you will not enter into the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 18:3). The apostles are not being commanded to have the age of little children, but to possess their innocence by means of their own diligent effort, an innocence that children possess because of their years. Thus they become children not in respect to wisdom, but to malice.

"Therefore, whoever humbles himself as this little child, he is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 18:4). Just as this little child, whose example I offer to you, does not persist in wrath, does not remember injuries, is not enticed when it looks upon a beautiful woman, does not think one thing and say something else, so also you. For unless you have such innocence and purity of heart, you will not be able to enter the kingdom of heaven. Here is another interpretation: "Whoever humbles himself as this little child, he is greatest in the kingdom of heaven." That is to say, the one who imitates me and humbles himself through my example, so that he lowers himself as much as I have lowered myself when I "took the form of a servant" (Phil. 2:7), he will enter the kingdom of heaven.

"And he who receives one such little child in my name receives me." (Matt. 18:5) He who becomes the kind of person who imitates the humility and innocence of Christ, in him Christ is received. And he wisely added that they are not to be received on the basis of their own merit, but for the honor of their teacher. For otherwise, when this was made known to the apostles, they may have thought that they themselves had been honored.

-- St. Jerome (d. 420), Commentary on Matthew

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #555 on: March 22, 2018, 06:44:13 PM »
The same Abba Isaiah, when someone asked him what avarice was, replied, 'Not to believe that God cares for you, to despair of the promises of God and to love boasting.'

-- Abba Isaiah (5th century), The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (transl. by Benedicta Ward), p. 70

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #556 on: March 23, 2018, 10:12:07 PM »
In truth, our evil comes out of our want of resemblance to God, and our ignorance of Him; and, on the other hand, our great good consists in our resemblance to Him. And, therefore, our conversion and faith in the Being who is incorruptible and divine, seems to be truly our proper good, and ignorance and disregard of Him our evil; if, at least, those things which are produced in us and of us, being the evil effects of sin, are to be considered ours.

-- St. Methodius of Olympus (d. 311), Source

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #557 on: March 25, 2018, 10:05:29 PM »
Do not attempt to explain something difficult with contentiousness, but in the way which the spiritual law enjoins: with patience, prayer and unwavering hope.

-- St. Mark the Monk (d. 5th century), On the Spiritual Law 12

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #558 on: March 27, 2018, 06:17:28 PM »
Once a certain brother who lived with him asked him; ‘What is the mystery of contemplation?’ Realizing that he was intent on learning, the Elder replied: ‘I tell you, my son, that when one’s intellect is completely pure, God reveals to him the visions that are granted to the ministering powers and angelic hosts.’ The same brother also asked: ‘Why, father, do you find more joy in the psalms than in any other part of divine Scripture? And why, when quietly chanting them, do you say the words as though you were speaking with someone?’ And Abba Philimon replied: ‘My son, God has impressed the power of the psalms on my poor soul as He did on the soul of the prophet David. I cannot be separated from the sweetness of the visions about which they speak: they embrace all Scripture.’ He confessed these things with great humility, after being much pressed, and then only for the benefit of the questioner.

-- said of: Abba Philimon (7th century), Philokalia, v. 2, p. 347

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #559 on: March 28, 2018, 10:52:02 PM »
The bishops of every country ought to know who is the chief among them, and to esteem him as their head, and not to do any great thing without his consent; but every one to manage only the affairs that belong to his own parish, and the places subject to it. But let him not do anything without the consent of all; for it is by this means there will be unanimity, and God will be glorified by Christ, in the Holy Spirit.

-- Apostolic Canons 35 (4th century)
« Last Edit: March 28, 2018, 10:52:23 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #560 on: March 30, 2018, 06:15:37 PM »
As in the law, therefore, and in the Gospel [likewise], the first and greatest commandment is, to love the Lord God with the whole heart, and then there follows a commandment like to it, to love one's neighbour as one's self; the author of the law and the Gospel is shown to be one and the same. For the precepts of an absolutely perfect life, since they are the same in each Testament, have pointed out [to us] the same God, who certainly has promulgated particular laws adapted for each; but the more prominent and the greatest [commandments], without which salvation cannot [be attained], He has exhorted [us to observe] the same in both.

-- St. Irenaeus of Lyon (d. 202), Against Heresies 4.12.3


For the law, since it was laid down for those in bondage, used to instruct the soul by means of those corporeal objects which were of an external nature, drawing it, as by a bond, to obey its commandments, that man might learn to serve God. But the Word set free the soul, and taught that through it the body should be willingly purified. Which having been accomplished, it followed as of course, that the bonds of slavery should be removed, to which man had now become accustomed, and that he should follow God without fetters... Now all these [NT precepts], as I have already observed, were not [the injunctions] of one doing away with the [OT] law, but of one fulfilling, extending, and widening it among us; just as if one should say, that the more extensive operation of liberty implies that a more complete subjection and affection towards our Liberator had been implanted within us. For He did not set us free for this purpose, that we should depart from Him (no one, indeed, while placed out of reach of the Lord's benefits, has power to procure for himself the means of salvation), but that the more we receive His grace, the more we should love Him. Now the more we have loved Him, the more glory shall we receive from Him, when we are continually in the presence of the Father.

-- St. Irenaeus of Lyon (d. 202), Against Heresies 4.13.2-3

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #561 on: March 31, 2018, 02:50:19 PM »
You know, dearly beloved, what practice is observed when land is cultivated. First, thorns are pulled out and stones thrown away. Next, the soil itself is ploughed, harrowed, and dragged; then, in proper order, seed is sown in every fourth or fifth furrow. Thus it should also happen in our soul, beloved brethren. First, the thorns should be torn out, that is, evil thoughts. Next, the stones should be removed, that is, all malice and harshness ought to be taken away. Then, our heart should be broken up and cultivated by the plough of the Gospel and the ploughshare of the Cross: shattered by repentance, softened by almsgiving, and prepared by charity for the Lord's sowing. When the soil of our heart has been cleared and well cultivated, it can with joy receive the seed of the word of God and bring forth fruit, not only thirty-fold, but even sixty- and a hundred-fold.

Now, there are three professions in the holy Catholic Church: there are virgins, widows, and the married. Virgins produce the hundred-fold, widows the sixty-fold, and the married thirty-fold. One bears more, another less, but they are all kept in the heavenly barn and happily enjoy eternal bliss. Therefore, while the virgins think of Mary, the widows consider Anne, and married women reflect upon Susanna, they should imitate the chastity of those women in this life so that they may merit to be united and associated with them in eternity.

-- St. Caesarius of Arles (d. 542), Sermon 6.7

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #562 on: April 02, 2018, 02:04:34 PM »
May all who want to find genuine humility and rest for their soul learn to have a humble mind and to perceive that in it is all joy and glory, and peace, and in the haughtiness of superiority, the opposite. From where do all these agonies of the mind come from? Is it not by our haughtiness, and our thinking too greatly of ourselves? Is it not by elevating ourselves and our evil choices? Is it not the hardness of our nature that will lord over us? But how did this happen? Was not man formed in all comfort, all delight, in full peace and glory? Was he not placed in paradise? He was removed. Why? God said you will not do this, and he did it.

Do you see the arrogance of that, the stubbornness and the self-will? And thus God said, man is mad, he does not understand how to be happy, unless he suffers bad days he will depart and be brought to ruin. Unless he understands what strife is he will never understand what rest is. He then gave what he was due and cast him out of paradise. Then he delivered him over to his own will and to his own lusts, so that he might grind down his bones and learn that he is unable to go straight by himself, but only through the command of God. So that he might learn the poverty of disobedience and that peace that comes from obedience. As the prophet declared, "Your rebellion will instruct you."

Still, the virtue of God, as I have often stated, did not hate what he had made, but again urged him to be obedient. "Come to me," he said, "all you that are heavy laden and I will refresh you." That is to say, "See how you must work. See the distress you have brought on your own head. See how you are tried by evil and your own disobedience. But come change your behavior, admit your own impotence so that you may come to be at peace and true glory. Live with a humble mind rather than giving in to your grave by pretentious pride. Learn from me, because I am meek and humble of heart and you will discover rest for your souls."

-- St. Dorotheus of Gaza (6th century), Discourses: About Renunciation
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 02:05:08 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Antonis

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #563 on: April 02, 2018, 02:15:26 PM »
1. His [St. Dionysios of Alexandria's] fifth epistle was written to Xystus, bishop of Rome. In this, after saying much against the heretics, he relates a certain occurrence of his time as follows: For truly, brother, I am in need of counsel, and I ask your judgment concerning a certain matter which has come to me, fearing that I may be in error.

2. For one of the brethren that assemble, who has long been considered a believer, and who, before my ordination, and I think before the appointment of the blessed Heraclas, was a member of the congregation, was present with those who were recently baptized. And when he heard the questions and answers, he came to me weeping, and bewailing himself; and falling at my feet he acknowledged and protested that the baptism with which he had been baptized among the heretics was not of this character, nor in any respect like this, because it was full of impiety and blasphemy.

3. And he said that his soul was now pierced with sorrow, and that he had not confidence to lift his eyes to God, because he had set out from those impious words and deeds. And on this account he besought that he might receive this most perfect purification, and reception and grace.

4. But I did not dare to do this; and said that his long communion was sufficient for this. For I should not dare to renew from the beginning one who had heard the giving of thanks and joined in repeating the Amen; who had stood by the table and had stretched forth his hands to receive the blessed food; and who had received it, and partaken for a long while of the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ. But I exhorted him to be of good courage, and to approach the partaking of the saints with firm faith and good hope.

5. But he does not cease lamenting, and he shudders to approach the table, and scarcely, though entreated, does he dare to be present at the prayers.

6. Besides these there is also extant another epistle of the same man on baptism, addressed by him and his parish to Xystus and the church at Rome. In this he considers the question then agitated with extended argument. And there is extant yet another after these, addressed to Dionysius of Rome, concerning Lucian. So much with reference to these.


-- from the Church History of Eusebius, Book VII, Ch. 9, "The Ungodly Baptism of the Heretics"
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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #564 on: April 03, 2018, 03:44:07 PM »
But when the days of Easter have come, during those eight days, that is, from Easter to the Octave, when the dismissal from the church has been made, they go with hymns to the Anastasis. Prayer is said anon, the faithful are blessed, and the bishop stands, leaning against the inner rails which are in the cave of the Anastasis, and explains all things that are done in Baptism. In that hour no catechumen approaches the Anastasis, but only the neophytes and the faithful, who wish to hear concerning the mysteries, enter there, and the doors are shut lest any catechumen should draw near. And while the bishop discusses and sets forth each point, the voices of those who applaud are so loud that they can be heard outside the church. And truly the mysteries are so unfolded that there is no one unmoved at the things that he hears to be so explained.

Now, forasmuch as in that province some of the people know both Greek and Syriac, while some know Greek alone and others only Syriac; and because the bishop, although he knows Syriac, yet always speaks Greek, and never Syriac, there is always a priest standing by who, when the bishop speaks Greek, interprets into Syriac, that all may understand what is being taught. And because all the lessons that are read in the church must be read in Greek, he always stands by and interprets them into Syriac, for the people's sake, that they may always be edified. Moreover, the Latins here, who understand neither Syriac nor Greek, in order that they be not disappointed, have (all things) explained to them, for there are other brothers and sisters knowing both Greek and Latin, who translate into Latin for them. But what is above all things very pleasant and admirable here, is that the hymns, the antiphons, and the lessons, as well as the prayers which the bishop says, always have suitable and fitting references, both to the day that is being celebrated and also to the place where the celebration is taking place.

-- The Pilgrimage of Egeria 7.5 (4th century),

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #565 on: April 03, 2018, 05:56:48 PM »
I wonder why the bishop chose Greek over Syriac.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #566 on: April 03, 2018, 07:26:21 PM »
EDIT--Not sure
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 07:27:55 PM by Asteriktos »

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #567 on: April 03, 2018, 09:26:11 PM »
I wonder why the bishop chose Greek over Syriac.

I guess they were in Jerusalem, so maybe that was just the unofficial language of the place? Plus they might have people from all over, not just speaking Syriac and Latin as mentioned, but maybe other languages as well, so they just do one and them manage the rest as best they can? I'm guessing here...

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #568 on: April 03, 2018, 10:11:12 PM »
I wonder why the bishop chose Greek over Syriac.
The churches in Jerusalem were erected by Hellenic Romans. The liturgy would certainly be in Greek.

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #569 on: April 03, 2018, 10:25:10 PM »
Yeah, both your answers make sense.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #570 on: April 04, 2018, 03:28:54 PM »
For by whose teachings but those of Patience is Charity—the highest sacrament of the faith, the treasure-house of the Christian name, which the apostle commends with the whole strength of the Holy Spirit— trained? Charity, he says, is long suffering; thus she applies patience: is beneficent; Patience does no evil: is not emulous; that certainly is a peculiar mark of patience: savours not of violence: she has drawn her self-restraint from patience: is not puffed up; is not violent; for that pertains not unto patience: nor does she seek her own if, she offers her own, provided she may benefit her neighbours: nor is irritable; if she were, what would she have left to Impatience? Accordingly he says, Charity endures all things; tolerates all things; of course because she is patient. Justly, then, will she never fail; for all other things will be cancelled, will have their consummation.

-- Tertullian (d. 240), On Patience 12

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #571 on: April 08, 2018, 08:59:21 PM »
And I can show the trophies of the apostles. For if you choose to go to the Vatican or to the Ostian Road, you will find the trophies of those who founded this church.

-- Fr. Caius of Rome (d. early-3rd century), Fragments from a Dialogue or Disputation Against Proclus

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #572 on: April 09, 2018, 06:21:22 PM »
Imitate, therefore, the ambassador of our Lord, and be his follower in every thing. That John, again, who "reclined on the bosom of our Lord, and whom He greatly loved," (John 21:20)--he, too, was a holy person. For it was not without reason that our Lord loved him. Paul, also, and Barnabas, and Timothy, with all the others, "whose names are written in the book of life," (Phil. 4:3)--these, I say, all cherished and loved sanctity, and ran in the contest, and finished their course without blemish, as imitators of Christ, and as sons of the living God. Moreover, also, Elijah and Elisha, and many other holy men, we find to have lived a holy and spotless life. If, therefore, you desire to be like these, imitate them with all your power.

-- Pseudo-Clement?? (2nd century), Epistles on Virginity 1.6

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #573 on: April 10, 2018, 09:37:13 PM »
Rufinus, presbyter of the church at Aquileia, was not the least among the doctors of the church and had a fine talent for elegant translation from Greek into Latin. In this way he opened to the Latin speaking church the greater part of the Greek literature; translating the works of Basil of Caesarea in Cappadocia, Gregory Nazianzan, that most eloquent man, the Recognitions of Clement of Rome, the Church history of Eusebius of Caesarea in Palestine, the Sentences of Xystus, the Sentences of Evagrius and the work of Pamphilus Martyr Against the mathematicians. Whatever among all these which are read by the Latins have prefatory matter, have been translated by Rufinus, but those which are without Prologue have been translated by some one else who did not choose to write a prologue. Not all of Origen, however, is his work, for Jerome translated some which are identified by his prologue. On his own account, the same Rufinus, ever through the grace of God published an Exposition of the Apostles' creed so excellent that other expositions are regarded as of no account in comparison.

-- Gennadius of Massilia (d. 496), Additions to 'On Illustrious Men,' 17

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #574 on: April 11, 2018, 08:02:42 PM »
He showed me again many trees, some budding, and others withered. And he said to me, "Do you see these trees?" "I see, sir," I replied, "some putting forth buds, and others withered." "Those," he said, "which are budding are the righteous who are to live in the world to come; for the coming world is the summer of the righteous, but the winter of sinners. When, therefore, the mercy of the Lord shines forth, then shall they be made manifest who are the servants of God, and all men shall be made manifest. For as in summer the fruits of each individual tree appear, and it is ascertained of what sort they are, so also the fruits of the righteous shall be manifest, and all who have been fruitful in that world shall be made known.

"But the heathen and sinners, like the withered trees which you saw, will be found to be those who have been withered and unfruitful in that world, and shall be burnt as wood, and [so] made manifest, because their actions were evil during their lives. For the sinners shall be consumed because they sinned and did not repent, and the heathen shall be burned because they knew not Him who created them. You should therefore bear fruit, that in that summer your fruit may be known. And refrain from much business, and you will never sin: for they who are occupied with much business commit also many sins, being distracted about their affairs, and not at all serving their Lord. How, then, he continued, can such a one ask and obtain anything from the Lord, if he serve Him not? They who serve Him shall obtain their requests, but they who serve Him not shall receive nothing. And in the performance even of a single action a man can serve the Lord; for his mind will not be perverted from the Lord, but he will serve Him, having a pure mind. If, therefore, you do these things, you shall be able to bear fruit for the life to come. And every one who will do these things shall bear fruit."

-- Hermas (mid-2nd century), The Shepherd, 3.4

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #575 on: April 12, 2018, 11:28:18 PM »
Now I must proceed to my former subject of faith, that on it are reared up all the good works of the building. And again, in what I said with regard to the building, it was in no strange fashion that I spoke, but the blessed Apostle wrote in the first Epistle to the Corinthians, saying — "I as a wise master-builder have laid the foundation, but every one builds on it." (1 Cor.3:10) One builds silver and gold and goodly stones; another builds reed and straw and stubble. In the last day that building shall be tried by fire; for the gold and silver and goodly stones shall be preserved in the midst of the fire, because they are a firm building. But as for the straw and reed and stubble, the fire shall have power upon them and they shall be burned. And what is the gold and silver and goodly stones by which the building is raised up? Clearly the good deeds of faith, which shall be preserved in the midst of the fire; because Christ dwells in that secure building, and He is its preserver from the fire.

And let us consider and understand (this) from the example that God has given us also in the former dispensation, because the promises of that dispensation will abide sure for us. Let us then understand from (the case of) those three righteous men who were cast into the midst of the fire and were not burned, namely, Hananiah, Azariah and Misael, over whom the fire had no power, because they built a secure building and rejected the commandment of Nebuchadnezzar the king and did not worship the image that he made. And as for those who transgressed the commandment of God, the fire at once prevailed over them and burned them, and they were burned without mercy. For the Sodomites were burned like straw and reed and stubble. Furthermore, Nadab and Abihu were burned, who transgressed the commandment of God. Again, two hundred and fifty men were burned, who were offering incense. Again, two princes and a hundred who were with them were burned, because they approached the mountain on which Elijah was sitting, who ascended in a chariot of fire to heaven. The calumniators also were burned because they dug a pit for righteous men. Accordingly, beloved, the righteous shall be tried by the fire, like gold and silver and goodly stones, and the wicked shall be burned in the fire like straw and reed and stubble, and the fire shall have power upon them and they shall be burned; even as the Prophet Isaiah said: "By fire shall the Lord judge and by it shall He try all flesh." (Isa. 66:16) And again he said: "You shall go out and see the carcasses of the men who offended against Me, whose worm shall not die, nor shall their fire be quenched, and they shall be an astonishment to all flesh." (Isa. 66:24)

-- St. Aphrahat (d. c. 345), Demonstrations 1.12

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #576 on: April 13, 2018, 08:34:53 PM »
If humility is a supernatural gift of God, not everyone who is by nature gentle, quiet, prudent, or meek can be regarded as humble. There is a difference between natural and supernatural humility, as Isaac discusses in Chapter XVIII of Part II. There he claims that natural humility cannot be a substitute for that humility which is born in a Christian by deep repentance and the memory of God's greatness and Christ's humility:

"Humility of heart can occur in someone for two reasons: either as a result of a precise knowledge of one's sins; or as a result of recollecting the lowliness of our Lord--or rather, as a result of recollecting the greatness of God and the extent to which the greatness of the Lord lowered itself in order to speak to and instruct us human beings in various ways--so abasing himself that he even took a body from humanity. How much did our Lord's body endure, what did it have to go through, how despised did he appear to the world, while all the time he possessed ineffable glory on high with God the Father, with the angels trembling at the sight of him as the glory of his countenance blazed among their ranks! In our case, he appeared in such lowliness that humans could, because of the ordinariness of his appearance, seize hold of him as he spoke with them and hang him on the wood of the cross."

Natural humility has little in common with this supernatural humility:

"Do not adduce for me as an example those who are humble by nature, saying that there are many such people whose very nature testifies that they are humble... [These people] do not possess this discerning lowliness which consists in lowly thoughts, discerning and painstaking reflection, the insignificance in which a person regards himself, his heart broken, and the flow of tears stemming from suffering of mind and discernment of the will. If you choose, ask them. You will find that they have one of these, no meditation that causes them real suffering, no real concern over their consciences. They do not meditate and recollect the lowliness of our Lord; they are not pierced by the sharp pain that comes from a knowledge of their sins; there is no burning fervour which enflames their hearts at the recollection of the good things that are to come; they have none of the the other advantageous thoughts that are normally stirred up in the heart as a result of the mind's wakefulness."

-- Met. Hilarion Alfeyev, quoting St. Isaac the Syrian (d. 700), in: The Spiritual World of Isaac the Syrian, pp. 115-116

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #577 on: April 14, 2018, 07:12:05 PM »
Though we are crucified to the world, though we have renounced this transitory life and our purely human limitations, aspiring to the state of the angels by sharing their dispassion, yet we have relapsed and fallen back. Because of our material concerns and shameful acquisitiveness, we have blunted the edge of true asceticism; and by our negligence we discredit even those who through their genuine sanctity truly deserve to be honored. Wearing the monastic habit, we have 'put our hand to the plough', yet we look back, forgetting and even strongly rejecting our duties, and so do not become 'fit for the kingdom of heaven' (Luke 9:62). So we no longer pursue plainness and simplicity of life. We no longer value stillness, which helps to free us from past defilement, but prefer a whole host of things which distract us uselessly from our true goal. Rivalry over material possessions has made us forget the counsel of the Lord, who urged us to take no thought for earthly things, but to seek only the kingdom of heaven (Matt. 6:33). Deliberately doing the opposite, we have disregarded the Lord's commandment, trusting in ourselves and not in His protection.

-- St. Neilos the Ascetic (d. 430), Ascetic Discourse (Philokalia, v. 1, pp. 202-203)

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #578 on: April 15, 2018, 08:40:31 PM »
"Then Jesus was led into the desert by the Spirit in order to be tempted by the devil." (Matt. 4:1)

The passage into the desert, the forty days of fasting, the hunger after fasting, the temptation of Satan, and the response of the Lord have been fulfilled in accordance with the realization of a great and heavenly plan... The Lord hungered not for the food of man but for their salvation. In fact, he was hungry after the forty days, not during that forty-day period, just as Moses and Elijah were not hungry when they fasted for the same amount of time (Ex. 34:28; 1 Kin. 19:8). Although the Lord hungered, his abstinence from food did not undermine him, since his power, which is not affected by his fasting for forty days, handed over his humanity to its own nature. It was necessary to defeat the devil, not by God, but by the flesh, which the devil would never have dared to tempt unless he had recognized the weakness that hunger brings to human nature. This, at least, is what the devil discerned in him when he began with the words, 'If you are the Son of God' (Matt. 4:3). The statement is an uncertain one: 'if you are the son of God.' Even though the devil saw him going hungry, he was growing frightened of him who fasted for forty days. According to the ordering of these events, the Gospel indicates that following his experience of forty days, during which Christ would remain in this world after his Passion, he possessed a hunger for the salvation of humanity. In that time he brought back humanity, which he had assumed, as his appointed service to God the Father.

-- St. Hilary of Poitiers (d. 367), Commentary On Matthew 3.1-2

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #579 on: April 16, 2018, 09:07:50 PM »
Let the bishop be ordained after he has been chosen by all the people. When he has been named and shall please all, let him, with the presbytery and such bishops as may be present, assemble with the people on a Sunday. While all give their consent, the bishops shall lay their hands upon him, and the presbytery shall stand by in silence. All indeed shall keep silent, praying in their heart for the descent of the Spirit. Then one of the bishops who are present shall, at the request of all, lay his hand on him who is ordained bishop, and shall pray as follows, saying:

"God the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who dwellest on high yet hast respect to the lowly, who knowest all things before they come to pass. Thou hast appointed the borders of thy church by the word of thy grace, predestinating from the beginning the righteous race of Abraham. And making them princes and priests, and leaving not thy sanctuary without a ministry, thou hast from the beginning of the world been well pleased to be glorified among those whom thou hast chosen. Pour forth now that power, which is thine, of thy royal Spirit, which thou gavest to thy beloved Servant Jesus Christ, which he bestowed on his holy apostles, who established the church in every place, the church which thou hast sanctified unto unceasing glory and praise of thy name. Thou who knowest the hearts of all, grant to this thy servant, whom thou hast chosen to be bishop, [to feed thy holy flock] and to serve as thy high priest without blame, ministering night and day, to propitate thy countenance without ceasing and to offer thee the gifts of thy holy church. And by the Spirit of high-priesthood to have authority to remit sins according to thy commandment, to assign the lots according to thy precept, to loose every bond according to the authority which thou gavest to thy apostles, and to please thee in meekness and purity of heart, offering to thee an odour of sweet savour. Through thy Servant Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom be to thee glory, might, honour, with [the] Holy Spirit in [the] holy church, both now and always and world without end. Amen."

-- St. Hippolytus of Rome (d. 235), The Apostolic Tradition 2-3

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #580 on: April 17, 2018, 10:48:41 PM »
We have learned from divine precepts, dearly beloved, as well from things laid down by the apostles, that every human being situated along the hazards of this life must seek the mercy of God by being merciful. What hope would lift up the fallen, what medicine heal the wounded, if almsgiving did not remit faults, and needs of the poor did not become remedies of sin? So by saying "Blessed are the merciful, for God will have mercy on them," (Matt. 5:7) the Lord made it clear that the entire scale on which he is going to judge the whole world when he appears in his majesty would be tilted while hanging from the following balance: Only the quality of good works directed toward the destitute would determine the sentence (for the ungodly to burn with the devil, for the generous to reign with Christ).

What deeds will not be brought out at that time? What hidden things will not be disclosed? What consciences will not lie open? No one then "will glory in having a pure heart or in being unstained by sin." (Prov. 20:9) But since "mercy will be exalted over condemnation" (James 2:13) and the gifts of clemency will surpass any just compensation, all the lives led by mortals and all different kinds of actions will be appraised under the aspect of a single rule. No charges at all would be brought up where, in the acknowledgment of the Creator, works of compassion have been found. As for those on the left, this is not the only thing they have done that will be brought against them. No, the fact that it will be shown that they have been strangers to human feeling does not mean that they will be found alien to other sins. Rather, though standing accused on many grounds, they will be condemned primarily on this count, that they have not redeemed their crimes with any alms. (Dan. 4:24) Since only the hardest heart would fail to be moved by any misery at all among those in distress, and since someone who has the means but does not help the afflicted must be considered as unjust as the one who crushes the weak, what hope remains for sinners who do not even show mercy for the sake of obtaining it themselves?

-- St. Leo of Rome (d. 461), Sermon 11

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #581 on: April 18, 2018, 12:27:20 AM »
When the holy Apostle Paul preached at the place on the Hill of Ares (Acts 17:16-34), Dionysius accepted his salvific proclamation and became a Christian. For three years Saint Dionysius remained a companion of the holy Apostle Paul in preaching the Word of God. Later on, the Apostle Paul selected him as bishop of the city of Athens. And in the year 57 Saint Dionysius was present at the repose of the Most Holy Theotokos.

During the lifetime of the Mother of God, Saint Dionysius had journeyed from Athens to Jerusalem to meet Her. He wrote to his teacher the Apostle Paul: “I witness by God, that besides the very God Himself, there is nothing else filled with such divine power and grace. No one can fully comprehend what I saw. I confess before God: when I was with John, who shone among the Apostles like the sun in the sky, when I was brought before the countenance of the Most Holy Virgin, I experienced an inexpressible sensation. Before me gleamed a sort of divine radiance which transfixed my spirit. I perceived the fragrance of indescribable aromas and was filled with such delight that my very body became faint, and my spirit could hardly endure these signs and marks of eternal majesty and heavenly power. The grace from her overwhelmed my heart and shook my very spirit. If I did not have in mind your instruction, I should have mistaken Her for the very God. It is impossible to stand before greater blessedness than this which I beheld.”

--said of St. Dionysius the Areopagite (d. 96)
"Verily they that seek Thee, Lord, and keep the canons of Thy Holy Church shall never want any good thing.”
St. John the Merciful

"This is the one from the beginning, who seemed to be new, yet was found to be ancient and always young, being born in the hearts of the saints."
Letter to Diognetus 11.4

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #582 on: April 18, 2018, 07:11:19 PM »
We have learned from divine precepts, dearly beloved, as well from things laid down by the apostles, that every human being situated along the hazards of this life must seek the mercy of God by being merciful. What hope would lift up the fallen, what medicine heal the wounded, if almsgiving did not remit faults, and needs of the poor did not become remedies of sin? So by saying "Blessed are the merciful, for God will have mercy on them," (Matt. 5:7) the Lord made it clear that the entire scale on which he is going to judge the whole world when he appears in his majesty would be tilted while hanging from the following balance: Only the quality of good works directed toward the destitute would determine the sentence (for the ungodly to burn with the devil, for the generous to reign with Christ).

What deeds will not be brought out at that time? What hidden things will not be disclosed? What consciences will not lie open? No one then "will glory in having a pure heart or in being unstained by sin." (Prov. 20:9) But since "mercy will be exalted over condemnation" (James 2:13) and the gifts of clemency will surpass any just compensation, all the lives led by mortals and all different kinds of actions will be appraised under the aspect of a single rule. No charges at all would be brought up where, in the acknowledgment of the Creator, works of compassion have been found. As for those on the left, this is not the only thing they have done that will be brought against them. No, the fact that it will be shown that they have been strangers to human feeling does not mean that they will be found alien to other sins. Rather, though standing accused on many grounds, they will be condemned primarily on this count, that they have not redeemed their crimes with any alms. (Dan. 4:24) Since only the hardest heart would fail to be moved by any misery at all among those in distress, and since someone who has the means but does not help the afflicted must be considered as unjust as the one who crushes the weak, what hope remains for sinners who do not even show mercy for the sake of obtaining it themselves?

-- St. Leo of Rome (d. 461), Sermon 11

This inspired a split off, if anybody is interested.
Christ my God, set my heart on fire with love in You, that in its flame I may love You with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and with all my strength, and my neighbor as myself, so that by keeping Your commandments I may glorify You the Giver of every good and perfect gift. Amen.

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #583 on: April 18, 2018, 07:19:18 PM »
Neither need I say any thing about his pride and the haughtiness with which he assumed worldly dignities, and his wishing to be styled procurator rather than bishop, and his strutting through the market-places, and reading letters and reciting them as he walked in public, and his being escorted by multitudes of people going before him and following him; so that he brought ill-will and hatred on the faith by his haughty demeanour and by the arrogance of his heart. Nor shall I say any thing of the quackery which he practises in the ecclesiastical assemblies, in the way of courting popularity and making a great parade, and astounding by such arts the minds of the less sophisticated; nor of his setting up for himself a lofty tribunal and throne, so unlike a disciple of Christ; nor of his having a secretum and calling it by that name, after the manner of the rulers of this world; nor of his striking his thigh with his hand and beating the tribunal with his feet; nor of his censuring and insulting those who did not applaud him nor shake their handkerchiefs, as is done in the theatres, nor bawl out and leap about after the manner of his partisans, both male and female, who were such disorderly listeners to him, but chose to hear reverently and modestly as in the house of God; nor of his unseemly and violent attacks in the congregation upon the expounders of the Word who have already departed this life, and his magnifying of himself, not like a bishop, but like a sophist and juggler; nor of his putting a stop to the psalms sung in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ, as the recent compositions of recent men, and preparing women to sing psalms in honour of himself in the midst of the Church...

And then again there are these women— these adopted sisters, as the people of Antioch call them — who are kept by him and by the presbyters and deacons with him, whose incurable sins in this and other matters, though he is cognisant of them, and has convicted them, he connives at concealing, with the view of keeping the men subservient to himself, and preventing them, by fear for their own position, from daring to accuse him in the matter of his impious words and deeds. Besides this, he has made his followers rich, and for that he is loved and admired by those who set their hearts on these things.

-- Fr. Malchion of Antioch (d. 3rd century), Epistle Against Paul of Samosata 2-3
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 07:19:37 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Early Church Fathers
« Reply #584 on: April 19, 2018, 03:58:20 PM »
O Father of truth, behold your Son, the well-pleasing sacrifice to you,
as you accept him who died for me, so may I be forgiven through him.
Receive this offering from my hands and be reconciled with me.
And do not remember the sins I committed before your greatness.
Behold his blood is shed on Golgotha by the wicked, and it is pleading for me.
For my sake, accept my petition.
If you weigh how much are my debts and how much is your mercy,
your compassion is heavier than the mountains that are weighed by you.
Look at the sins and look at the offering for them--
the offering and sacrifice are much greater than the debts.
Because I sinned, your beloved One endured the nails and the spear.
Sufficient are his sufferings to reconcile you, and by them shall I live.
Glory be to the Father, who delivered his Son for our salvation.
Adoration to the Son, who died on the cross and gave life to all of us.
Thanks to the Spirit, who began and fulfilled the mystery of our salvation.
O Trinity, exalted aboe all, have mercy on us all.

-- Jacob of Serugh (d. 521), Source