Author Topic: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?  (Read 702 times)

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Offline Studying_Orthodoxy

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Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« on: November 20, 2013, 01:51:03 PM »
I have wondered if there was any contact between the thinkers and movements of the 16th century Reformation and the Orthodox faith. Did any consider adopting it or were they in any way influenced?

Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 02:02:37 PM »
The Tubingen Lutherans contacted Patriarch Jeremias for communion with them. But after apparent doctrinal differences the communion never happened.
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Offline moronikos

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 02:21:47 PM »
There was contact between the groups.  You might imagine they had a filial bond in their bad relations with Rome.

One summary is here: http://www.stpaulsirvine.org/html/sixteenthcentury.htm
And they were first called Christians in Antioch

Offline Rhinosaur

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2013, 07:23:26 PM »
Somewhat, but they were in largely separate worlds at the time; the Balkan Orthodox churches were under Ottoman rule, and thus had much more on their mind than papal corruption.  Russia was still somewhat isolated from Europe and had a religious setting in which Reformation really had no cultural relevance.  There was communication, but little came out of it.

To be honest, I can't see many of the early Protestants, especially those of the Calvinist strain, developing at deep kinship with Orthodox churches.  Minus the fact that the EOC did not suffer from the problems of the late Renaissance papacy, it had many aspects that strict Protestants did not like; ornate icons, reverence for saints, elaborate, oriental-style services, and an emphasis on all of the Sacraments.  I can honestly see a stern Puritan going to an Orthodox Mass and having a heart attack.  Add in the non-religious cultural and religious differences, as well as the growth of nationalism and secularism in the West, and I don't see a Protestant-Orthodox alliance going very far.

Offline mike

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2013, 07:28:10 PM »
Somewhat, but they were in largely separate worlds at the time; the Balkan Orthodox churches were under Ottoman rule, and thus had much more on their mind than papal corruption.  Russia was still somewhat isolated from Europe and had a religious setting in which Reformation really had no cultural relevance.  There was communication, but little came out of it.

Everyone forgets Rzeczpospolita.

Offline Romaios

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2013, 07:31:44 PM »
Everyone forgets Rzeczpospolita.

Remember - one cannot forget what one has never known.  ;)

Offline Tallitot

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2013, 08:35:16 PM »
The original Articles of Religion of the CofE mention the Orthodox churches.
Proverbs 22:7

Offline Maria

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2013, 08:37:52 PM »
The Tubingen Lutherans contacted Patriarch Jeremias for communion with them. But after apparent doctrinal differences the communion never happened.

It is sad that they missed this opportunity of grace. Perhaps they were not ready for the radical changes they would have been expected to make had they gone Orthodox.

There are some Lutherans who have headed towards the East today, aren't there?
« Last Edit: November 21, 2013, 08:38:43 PM by Maria »
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Offline Rhinosaur

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2013, 09:31:56 PM »
The Tubingen Lutherans contacted Patriarch Jeremias for communion with them. But after apparent doctrinal differences the communion never happened.

It is sad that they missed this opportunity of grace. Perhaps they were not ready for the radical changes they would have been expected to make had they gone Orthodox.

There are some Lutherans who have headed towards the East today, aren't there?

I think that the sola scriptura theology of Protestants probably made any conversion to Orthodoxy a near-impossibility; it was just too much of a departure from the Catholic-Orthodox tradition.

Offline Nicene

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2013, 11:59:45 PM »
Not really, aside from the before mentioned exchange between lutherans and the Patriarch. I think when you look at all sides of the reformation, the Calvanist, the anglican, the lutheran and radical reformation, there simply wasn't felt that you need to be part of a historically apostolic church. You needed faith and the bible and you were set, of course they didn't ignore the councils and the fathers and made use of them but they are all secondary to the ultimate and authoritative source of the faith to the reformer.

Thats what I see anyway.
Thank you.

Offline scamandrius

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2013, 12:08:36 AM »
Fr. George Mastrantonis compiled the correspondence in his book, Augsburg and Constantinople.

I would also suggest Sir Steven Runciman's book, The Great Church in Captivity, in book 2, chp. 5.
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Offline brastaseptim

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2013, 12:10:58 AM »
The Protestants ignored the 7th council, and most reformers denied the power of Confession and the authority of Tradition as well as Scripture. Sola Scriptura and Sola Fide are such dramatic departures from 1000 years of tradition, much less the denial of the honour due to the Saints and the Theotokos.
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Offline scamandrius

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2013, 12:20:08 AM »
The Protestants ignored the 7th council, and most reformers denied the power of Confession and the authority of Tradition as well as Scripture. Sola Scriptura and Sola Fide are such dramatic departures from 1000 years of tradition, much less the denial of the honour due to the Saints and the Theotokos.

Yes and no.  It all depends on whom you ask.  The Calvinists definitely, the Anglicans not so much and the Lutherans were split on the issue of images. 
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Offline dzheremi

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Re: Did The Reformation Consider Orthodoxy?
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2013, 12:37:45 AM »
Somewhat, but they were in largely separate worlds at the time; the Balkan Orthodox churches were under Ottoman rule, and thus had much more on their mind than papal corruption.  Russia was still somewhat isolated from Europe and had a religious setting in which Reformation really had no cultural relevance.  There was communication, but little came out of it.

Everyone forgets Rzeczpospolita.

Maybe they didn't forget it; maybe they just don't know how to spell it.