OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 21, 2014, 08:23:00 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Holy days of obligation?  (Read 379 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Sainte_Geneviève
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Catechumen
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 15



« on: November 07, 2013, 03:51:14 PM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?
Logged
LizaSymonenko
Слава Ісусу Христу!!! Glory to Jesus Christ!!!
Global Moderator
Toumarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: God's Holy Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A.
Posts: 13,196



WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2013, 04:07:41 PM »


You should "always" attend church.  Wink

Each Divine Liturgy offers us the Holy Gifts, and Christ stands and waits for us.

While Pascha is the Feast of all Feasts, all days are important.

In the least, I would attend Pascha, and the 12 Feast Days, if possible.

....did I mention, each Sunday is really important and great?   angel
Logged

Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 17,765


The Pope Emeritus reading OCNet


WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 04:11:54 PM »

I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!)...

This is probably best discussed in another thread, but this isn't really fair.  In some ways, our belief regarding "mortal sin" is "a relief", but in other ways that of Roman Catholicism is "easier". 
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


Mor Ephrem > Justin Kissel
Yurysprudentsiya
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA, although in my heart I will always remain a loving son of the UOC-USA
Posts: 2,060


God, the Great, the Only, Keep for Us Our Ukraine!


« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2013, 04:15:33 PM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

My understanding is that, in addition to Pascha, you are also supposed to attend on the 12 great feasts, at least either on the vigil or for the feast, provided that you are able and the parish has services.  Some of these always fall on Sunday and the rest, except Ascension, may sometimes fall on Sunday.  

Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept 8/21)
Exaltation of the Cross (Sept 14/27)
Presentation of the Theotokos (Nov 21/Dec 4)
Nativity of Our Lord (Dec 25/Jan 7)
Theophany (Jan 6/19)
Presentation of Our Lord (Feb 2/15)
Annunciation (Mar 25/Apr Cool
Palm Sunday
Ascension of Our Lord
Pentecost
Transfiguration (Aug 6/19)
For motion of the Mother of God (Aug 15/28)

To these you should add the other great feasts

Circumcision of Our Lord (Jan 1/14)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24/July 7)
Saints Peter and Paul (June 29/July 12)
Beheading of Saint John the Baptist (August 29/Sept 11) kept as a very strict fast
Protection of the Mother of God (Oct 1/14)

The name day of your parish is said to be second in rank only to Pascha and everyone should make a good effort to be there.  
Logged
Sainte_Geneviève
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Catechumen
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 15



« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2013, 04:38:44 PM »


My understanding is that, in addition to Pascha, you are also supposed to attend on the 12 great feasts, at least either on the vigil or for the feast, provided that you are able and the parish has services.  Some of these always fall on Sunday and the rest, except Ascension, may sometimes fall on Sunday.  

Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept 8/21)
Exaltation of the Cross (Sept 14/27)
Presentation of the Theotokos (Nov 21/Dec 4)
Nativity of Our Lord (Dec 25/Jan 7)
Theophany (Jan 6/19)
Presentation of Our Lord (Feb 2/15)
Annunciation (Mar 25/Apr Cool
Palm Sunday
Ascension of Our Lord
Pentecost
Transfiguration (Aug 6/19)
For motion of the Mother of God (Aug 15/28)

To these you should add the other great feasts

Circumcision of Our Lord (Jan 1/14)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24/July 7)
Saints Peter and Paul (June 29/July 12)
Beheading of Saint John the Baptist (August 29/Sept 11) kept as a very strict fast
Protection of the Mother of God (Oct 1/14)

The name day of your parish is said to be second in rank only to Pascha and everyone should make a good effort to be there.  

Thank you! That's exactly what I was looking for!

And yes, LizaSymonenko, I agree that attending Liturgy on Sundays is great. Grin I figured going on Sundays went without saying.
Logged
LBK
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,144


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2013, 06:47:23 PM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

My understanding is that, in addition to Pascha, you are also supposed to attend on the 12 great feasts, at least either on the vigil or for the feast, provided that you are able and the parish has services.  Some of these always fall on Sunday and the rest, except Ascension, may sometimes fall on Sunday.  

Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept 8/21)
Exaltation of the Cross (Sept 14/27)
Presentation of the Theotokos (Nov 21/Dec 4)
Nativity of Our Lord (Dec 25/Jan 7)
Theophany (Jan 6/19)
Presentation of Our Lord (Feb 2/15)
Annunciation (Mar 25/Apr Cool
Palm Sunday
Ascension of Our Lord
Pentecost
Transfiguration (Aug 6/19)
For motion of the Mother of God (Aug 15/28)

To these you should add the other great feasts

Circumcision of Our Lord (Jan 1/14)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24/July 7)
Saints Peter and Paul (June 29/July 12)
Beheading of Saint John the Baptist (August 29/Sept 11) kept as a very strict fast
Protection of the Mother of God (Oct 1/14)

The name day of your parish is said to be second in rank only to Pascha and everyone should make a good effort to be there.  

It is also considered A Good Thing to attend on the feast of your patron saint, if the church you attend is holding a service that day.  Smiley
Logged
Basil 320
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, Holy Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Posts: 3,070



« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2013, 04:01:05 AM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

My understanding is that, in addition to Pascha, you are also supposed to attend on the 12 great feasts, at least either on the vigil or for the feast, provided that you are able and the parish has services.  Some of these always fall on Sunday and the rest, except Ascension, may sometimes fall on Sunday.  

Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept 8/21)
Exaltation of the Cross (Sept 14/27)
Presentation of the Theotokos (Nov 21/Dec 4)
Nativity of Our Lord (Dec 25/Jan 7)
Theophany (Jan 6/19)
Presentation of Our Lord (Feb 2/15)
Annunciation (Mar 25/Apr Cool
Palm Sunday
Ascension of Our Lord
Pentecost
Transfiguration (Aug 6/19)
For motion of the Mother of God (Aug 15/28)

To these you should add the other great feasts

Circumcision of Our Lord (Jan 1/14)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24/July 7)
Saints Peter and Paul (June 29/July 12)
Beheading of Saint John the Baptist (August 29/Sept 11) kept as a very strict fast
Protection of the Mother of God (Oct 1/14)

The name day of your parish is said to be second in rank only to Pascha and everyone should make a good effort to be there.  

Yes indeed.  As noted above, Orthodox Christians are encouraged to attend the Divine Services as frequently as possible, especially every Sunday and the days of the 12 Great Feasts.

The Calendar made available through the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, prints an Icon of the Feast on days when parish priests should be conducting the Divine Liturgy.  The are also Feast Days of many saints when services are also conducted. And there are seasonal and special purpose services such as the three Saturday's of the Triodion Period, the Saturday's of the Souls, and the Presanctified Liturgy on Wednesday's and Friday's during the 40 Day Great Fast, the Friday evening Salutations to the Theotokos during the Great Fast (in Greek practice), the morning and evening services of Great Week, and the Supplications (Paraklesis) to the Theotokos during the first 15 Days of August.  Not to mention Vespers Saturday evenings, and the eve of the Feasts, or the Vigil (in Russian practice), and Matins (Orthros) before the Divine Liturgy.

Sometimes, for one reason or another, a parish may not be celebrating the Divine Liturgy for a particular feast, so it's worth checking around neighboring parishes to see if they are conducting serves that day.

While the Orthodox Church does not have "Holy Days of Obligation," there is a canon, not enforced, that would suspend a member of the faithful for not attending the Divine Liturgy for 3 consecutive Sunday's without good cause.  These individuals would only be allowed to attend the Divine Liturgy from the Narthex for 7 years, if I'm not mistaken.  This canon is indicative of the importance the Church places on attendance at the Divine Liturgy.
Logged

"...Strengthen the Orthodox Community..."
IoanC
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,384



« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2013, 04:21:36 AM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

You are never obligated in the legal sense. Orthodoxy attempts to heal the soul and restore man to his normal state, in union with God, and form and unite The Church. So, in this context, it's not that you are obligated to do something, but that it would be good for you to do something; and if you can't do something, then that is understandable. Ill people often can't do very much and they can't be blamed, unless they don't constantly seek to be healed so that they can eventually do what is good for them.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 04:23:49 AM by IoanC » Logged

Yurysprudentsiya
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA, although in my heart I will always remain a loving son of the UOC-USA
Posts: 2,060


God, the Great, the Only, Keep for Us Our Ukraine!


« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2013, 07:08:21 AM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

My understanding is that, in addition to Pascha, you are also supposed to attend on the 12 great feasts, at least either on the vigil or for the feast, provided that you are able and the parish has services.  Some of these always fall on Sunday and the rest, except Ascension, may sometimes fall on Sunday.  

Nativity of the Theotokos (Sept 8/21)
Exaltation of the Cross (Sept 14/27)
Presentation of the Theotokos (Nov 21/Dec 4)
Nativity of Our Lord (Dec 25/Jan 7)
Theophany (Jan 6/19)
Presentation of Our Lord (Feb 2/15)
Annunciation (Mar 25/Apr Cool
Palm Sunday
Ascension of Our Lord
Pentecost
Transfiguration (Aug 6/19)
For motion of the Mother of God (Aug 15/28)

To these you should add the other great feasts

Circumcision of Our Lord (Jan 1/14)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24/July 7)
Saints Peter and Paul (June 29/July 12)
Beheading of Saint John the Baptist (August 29/Sept 11) kept as a very strict fast
Protection of the Mother of God (Oct 1/14)

The name day of your parish is said to be second in rank only to Pascha and everyone should make a good effort to be there.  

Yes indeed.  As noted above, Orthodox Christians are encouraged to attend the Divine Services as frequently as possible, especially every Sunday and the days of the 12 Great Feasts.

The Calendar made available through the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, prints an Icon of the Feast on days when parish priests should be conducting the Divine Liturgy.  The are also Feast Days of many saints when services are also conducted. And there are seasonal and special purpose services such as the three Saturday's of the Triodion Period, the Saturday's of the Souls, and the Presanctified Liturgy on Wednesday's and Friday's during the 40 Day Great Fast, the Friday evening Salutations to the Theotokos during the Great Fast (in Greek practice), the morning and evening services of Great Week, and the Supplications (Paraklesis) to the Theotokos during the first 15 Days of August.  Not to mention Vespers Saturday evenings, and the eve of the Feasts, or the Vigil (in Russian practice), and Matins (Orthros) before the Divine Liturgy.

Sometimes, for one reason or another, a parish may not be celebrating the Divine Liturgy for a particular feast, so it's worth checking around neighboring parishes to see if they are conducting serves that day.

While the Orthodox Church does not have "Holy Days of Obligation," there is a canon, not enforced, that would suspend a member of the faithful for not attending the Divine Liturgy for 3 consecutive Sunday's without good cause.  These individuals would only be allowed to attend the Divine Liturgy from the Narthex for 7 years, if I'm not mistaken.  This canon is indicative of the importance the Church places on attendance at the Divine Liturgy.

I have heard that canon but I have never seen it strictly enforced.  Instead I have seen such people welcomed as the prodigal upon their return.  Our priest encourages that if we miss one Sunday DL without good reason (such as sickness of having to work) we need to go to confession before taking communion again.
Logged
Yurysprudentsiya
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA, although in my heart I will always remain a loving son of the UOC-USA
Posts: 2,060


God, the Great, the Only, Keep for Us Our Ukraine!


« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2013, 07:13:00 AM »

I come from a Roman Catholic background where we had holy days of obligation, which meant if you were not in church on those days, you committed a mortal sin. I know Orthodoxy does not believe in mortal sin (a relief!), but besides major feast days (Pascha, the Incarnation, etc), are there any other holy days where you're obligated to attend church?

You are never obligated in the legal sense. Orthodoxy attempts to heal the soul and restore man to his normal state, in union with God, and form and unite The Church. So, in this context, it's not that you are obligated to do something, but that it would be good for you to do something; and if you can't do something, then that is understandable. Ill people often can't do very much and they can't be blamed, unless they don't constantly seek to be healed so that they can eventually do what is good for them.

Yes, this is a great point!   The services are like healing medicine.  The Great Physician may prescribe, but if the patient doesn't take the medicine, how can she get better?   
Logged
IoanC
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,384



« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2013, 07:30:23 AM »

I have heard that canon but I have never seen it strictly enforced.  Instead I have seen such people welcomed as the prodigal upon their return.  Our priest encourages that if we miss one Sunday DL without good reason (such as sickness of having to work) we need to go to confession before taking communion again.

I believe it is good that your priest welcomes back the person like the prodigal son and helps him regain his spiritual integrity through confession. It's all The Church has to do: administer medicine and make sure people can receive it no matter how hard and complicated their situation gets.
Logged

Tags: feast days 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.072 seconds with 38 queries.