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Author Topic: How do I make Orthodoxy a part of my everyday life?  (Read 1197 times) Average Rating: 0
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Sainte_Geneviève
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« on: October 16, 2013, 11:33:00 AM »

Hi all,

I've recently been blessed as Catechumen to the Orthodoxy faith. I used to be a Roman Catholic, but I was never too devout. I was a "Sunday Catholic" so to speak. I don't want to be this way with Orthodoxy. Besides attending Divine Liturgy and praying at least twice a day, how can I make Orthodoxy something I don't "take off" every Sunday with my church clothes?

Thanks, everyone!
Geneviève (Jenny)
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2013, 11:47:46 AM »

Prayer, prayer, prayer. Never miss your morning or evening prayers.
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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2013, 11:59:45 AM »



keep the fasts, that's an everyday thing.

If your parish has bible study, or even something like an akathist on a weekday, attend.

Same thing with Vespers on both weekdays and Sat night if they have them.


Listen to things like Ancient Faith Radio, read books...etc.
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2013, 12:30:40 PM »

Also, don't forget you're a layman. Don't try to absorb all the monastic rules while you're still a Catechumen or newly converted.
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2013, 12:32:57 PM »

Also, don't forget you're a layman. Don't try to absorb all the monastic rules while you're still a Catechumen or newly converted.

This.  You can burnout in no time.  Do a bit at a time and develop a pattern that you can follow.
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2013, 12:37:04 PM »

Speak to your spiritual father about developing a rule of prayer & spiritual reading as an anchor.  Outside the set times of prayer & spiritual reading, take brief moments in the day to recall and reflect on what you read earlier in order for the words to become more firmly established in your heart.  Do your best to put into practice what you read with the guidance of your spiritual father.  Confess and receive Holy Communion as often as you can.  Pray as often as you can, keep the fasts, and attend services as often as possible.
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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2013, 12:56:27 PM »

Speak to your spiritual father about developing a rule of prayer & spiritual reading as an anchor.  Outside the set times of prayer & spiritual reading, take brief moments in the day to recall and reflect on what you read earlier in order for the words to become more firmly established in your heart.  Do your best to put into practice what you read with the guidance of your spiritual father.  Confess and receive Holy Communion as often as you can.  Pray as often as you can, keep the fasts, and attend services as often as possible.

+1.   Attend divine services as you are able.  Consult with your spiritual father about prayer and fasting rules for you.  And keep them as best you are able.  When you stumble and fall come to him for confession and instruction.  This is the best way to live life in the church.  Everything else will flow from there. 
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2013, 12:57:29 PM »

Hi all,

I've recently been blessed as Catechumen to the Orthodoxy faith. I used to be a Roman Catholic, but I was never too devout. I was a "Sunday Catholic" so to speak. I don't want to be this way with Orthodoxy. Besides attending Divine Liturgy and praying at least twice a day, how can I make Orthodoxy something I don't "take off" every Sunday with my church clothes?

Thanks, everyone!
Geneviève (Jenny)

Hi Jenny,

You've gotten a lot of good advice, particularly about the danger of burning out from taking on too much too soon.  Be careful of that: enthusiasm is a good thing, but it can also be a bad thing.  

In terms of "every day", here are my recommendations, which largely coincide with everyone else's:

1.  Daily prayer, preferably morning and evening, but at least once a day; if you haven't already consulted your priest about the basics, please do, and try your best to follow his advice.  Also, some short prayers throughout the day when you have a free moment, to bring your mind and heart back to God.  It need not be any longer than "Lord, have mercy".  Sometimes, if it's a bad day, I just look up and groan.  Tongue
2.  Daily reading from Scripture.  The daily readings (which I'm sure can be found on the Antiochian Archdiocese website, perhaps on your parish's website, a parish calendar, or any number of other places) are a good place to start if you don't have a regular reading habit--they shouldn't take more than five or ten minutes to read on any given day.  Perhaps you could pick a line or two that jump out at you and think about them a bit right then and there or during your day.  
3.  Try to remember the Wednesday and Friday fasts, to observe them: ask your priest about the best way to start.  They are only two days, but somehow their effect spills over into the rest of the week.  
4.  If your parish has more services than the Sunday Liturgy, try to go to them as you can; in general, try to be an active member of your parish.  
5.  Don't take the Orthodox internet too seriously.

If you can do that, that's plenty to start with.  But if you can't do all of it, start where you can and grow into it.  It shouldn't be too easy, but it shouldn't be an oppressive burden either.  Smiley      
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2013, 01:11:11 PM »

You can: ( Set-up a prayer corner, saying the morning and evening prayers while studying about Orthodoxy online.)
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« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2013, 01:25:22 PM »

You can: ( Set-up a prayer corner, saying the morning and evening prayers while studying about Orthodoxy online.)

Fixed.
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2013, 01:37:49 PM »

Besides attending Divine Liturgy and praying at least twice a day, how can I make Orthodoxy something I don't "take off" every Sunday with my church clothes?

If you can manage to faithfully attend services every Sunday and pray even mechanically every morning and night sticking to a prayer rule, then you are already doing quite a lot.

But there is also reading Holy Scripture, lives of the saints, doing charitable work, and praying for the needs of those around you as a few other things you can move toward if you aren't already doing those things.
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« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2013, 01:55:03 PM »

all of the above!

the effect of this is to deepen your relationship with God.
enjoy spending time with God praying or listening or studying the Bible.
also force yourself to pray when you don't want to.
the demons don't want you to pray (don't worry there are lots more angels than demons) and will distract you.
also you made find you are a weak human like me and sometimes need encouragement to get out of bed in the morning
(going to bed early helps here!)
so pray for 5 minutes every day and build it up once you can regularly do 5 minutes.

the spiritual life is about consistently being with God, rather than an emotional roller coaster of miracles and depression.
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2013, 02:11:52 PM »

Thank you for your advice, everyone, especially on the warning of "burning out". Praying twice a day is a struggle for me, mostly because I like to sleep in until my two young children wake up (around 8:00 am). I'm usually only able to get myself pray at night when my husband and kids are in bed. Although, we have been praying recently as a family before my kids go to bed.

I asked my priest (at the Orthodox Church I attend) about setting up a prayer rule. He told me to be patient and that it would reveal itself in time. I'll admit that I was a bit disappointed in that response, but he, obviously, knows what he's doing (and I don't). He also told my family and me to start fasting from meat first, and as that gets easier, remove something else.

I'll definitely start adding the Scriptures into my life and pray for the diligence to pray often!
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2013, 02:14:13 PM »

Thank you for your advice, everyone, especially on the warning of "burning out". Praying twice a day is a struggle for me, mostly because I like to sleep in until my two young children wake up (around 8:00 am). I'm usually only able to get myself pray at night when my husband and kids are in bed. Although, we have been praying recently as a family before my kids go to bed.

I asked my priest (at the Orthodox Church I attend) about setting up a prayer rule. He told me to be patient and that it would reveal itself in time. I'll admit that I was a bit disappointed in that response, but he, obviously knows what he's doing (and I don't). He also told my family and me to start fasting from meat first, and as that gets easier, remove something else.

I'll definitely start adding the Scriptures into my life and pray for the diligence to pray often!

In the struggle, you will find peace.  For some, like me, I struggle to wake up a little earlier to pray.  For others, it may be fasting.  In time, these things will get easier.  The whole process will teach you patience.
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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2013, 02:18:59 PM »

praying as a family is a very very good idea!
 Smiley
maybe you could include the Lord's prayer (our Father) in your family prayers, and then some time when you have time check if the kids understand it so they can pray it from the heart.
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« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2013, 04:13:57 PM »

Quote
Hi Jenny,

You've gotten a lot of good advice, particularly about the danger of burning out from taking on too much too soon.  Be careful of that: enthusiasm is a good thing, but it can also be a bad thing. 

In terms of "every day", here are my recommendations, which largely coincide with everyone else's:

1.  Daily prayer, preferably morning and evening, but at least once a day; if you haven't already consulted your priest about the basics, please do, and try your best to follow his advice.  Also, some short prayers throughout the day when you have a free moment, to bring your mind and heart back to God.  It need not be any longer than "Lord, have mercy".  Sometimes, if it's a bad day, I just look up and groan.  Tongue
2.  Daily reading from Scripture.  The daily readings (which I'm sure can be found on the Antiochian Archdiocese website, perhaps on your parish's website, a parish calendar, or any number of other places) are a good place to start if you don't have a regular reading habit--they shouldn't take more than five or ten minutes to read on any given day.  Perhaps you could pick a line or two that jump out at you and think about them a bit right then and there or during your day. 
3.  Try to remember the Wednesday and Friday fasts, to observe them: ask your priest about the best way to start.  They are only two days, but somehow their effect spills over into the rest of the week.   
4.  If your parish has more services than the Sunday Liturgy, try to go to them as you can; in general, try to be an active member of your parish. 
5.  Don't take the Orthodox internet too seriously.

Great advice. Especially about prayer.
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« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2013, 04:35:29 PM »

Some excellent and practical advice here:
http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Theophan-Prayer.html
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« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2013, 05:14:47 PM »

I believe Jenny was trying to find ways to "be" Orthodox, not just by going to Church or praying or reading the Scripture. How's doing all these different from any other Christian denomination?

I'll think about some more, but here's what I got so far.

1. Buy a prayer rope and get into the habit of saying "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, the sinner" .The prayer rope is an Orthodox "bracelet" or " necklace" that you can wear all the time. You'll always be reminded that you are an Orthodox. Smiley

2. Start acquiring Icons and create an Icon corner in your house. Put the Icons in a place where you can see them and interact with them constantly.



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« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2013, 05:58:29 PM »

The OP is speaking of acquiring an Orthodox Phronema.  There are lots of great info on Orthodox Info. com.  I'll try to say more later.
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« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2013, 07:57:27 PM »

We're kindred spirits--I'm also a former Catholic.  Phronema, yes, and I understood that to be what you were asking, but we're also in the learning stage.  Not sure you ever get out of that stage in Orthodoxy, but we're learning the basics, and if you don't pick those up, you'll feel lost.

Definitely watch out for burnout, like everyone said.  Someone also said to learn about Orthodoxy on the internet--that's not the best advice unless you're very very very discerning as to source, and careful not to make it your main or only resource.  You can find a lot of good information but also a ton of misinformation.  Ancient Faith is an excellent site--someone mentioned that one, and it's fantastic.  Many are podcasts of homilies and Bible studies, and just based on that alone, I consider it an invaluable resource.  I load up a podcast and let it play while I'm doing something else--usually Bubble Witch or Solitaire, but there ya go.  Something that keeps my hands busy, but that also won't distract me from the podcast.  And I have my favorites.

I'd suggest Fr James Early's podcasts , because they're the Bible Study classes at his parish.  Just go to the first one at the very bottom of the list, which would be the first in the series, and work your way up to the most recent.  The first podcast is Introduction to the Catholic Epistles from Dec 04, 2009.  
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« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2013, 09:46:29 PM »

Hello Jenny.
One thing that I do not see being mentioned here is socializing which I believe is also very important. Make some friends from the parish (and -or Orthodox from other parishes). Also visit Orthodox parishes and monasferies close by if possible especially during the namesday of that church. Some parishes have organized visits which might be in your case as well. Thefe is literature, music and movies. There are organization within the Church which you can join .  Depending of your age there has to be something you can find. If there is awill there is a way. Ask your priest about upcoming events and ceremonies.  May God bless you!
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« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2013, 10:20:47 PM »

You've gotten a lot of good advice so far. I definitely agree with sharing your prayer time with the kids and your spouse too. I drive my kids to school in the morning and we pray together on the way. Not ideal perhaps but given the difficulty getting them out of bed and ready it's what we can manage together.
 
Also, be patient with your priest and with the process, as you said he knows what hes doing and there is no need to hurry Orthodoxy is a process that spans this life and beyond.

Welcome to the forum.
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« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2013, 10:48:23 PM »

1. Buy a prayer rope and get into the habit of saying "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, the sinner" .The prayer rope is an Orthodox "bracelet" or " necklace" that you can wear all the time. You'll always be reminded that you are an Orthodox. Smiley

I have to strongly disagree with this. Prayer ropes are generally for monks, and most Orthodox people in the world don't walk around with prayer ropes as bracelets. It's totally ridiculous and you'll look like a nut job to most normal culturally Orthodox people. Interior prayer is a deeper thing that you grow into and running around as a new inquirer with a prayer rope is beyond the pale. Laypeople can use prayer ropes at home and with private devotions but literally wearing it on your sleeve in public seems so presumptuous and pretentious at this point that I have to suppress a HUGE eye roll. There are a few non-monks I know that wear these around convincingly but they are some of the most serious spiritual people I know, and they're older and have a very wise demeanor about them, and they are all clergy at some level.

Again, I'm not saying that you can't use a prayer rope, but to advise someone who has just started investigating to buy a prayer rope and start saying the Jesus prayer as a way to remind them that they are Orthodox seems incredibly stupid and juvenile to me. Rant over.
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« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2013, 12:28:52 AM »

I believe Jenny was trying to find ways to "be" Orthodox, not just by going to Church or praying or reading the Scripture. How's doing all these different from any other Christian denomination?

Why an Earth it should be intentionally different from any other Christian denomination? What's different enought? Changing name to Helpmeet Helena and learning Russian accent
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« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2013, 12:35:38 AM »

This is theoretically very easy:

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.
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« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2013, 01:04:08 AM »

I believe Jenny was trying to find ways to "be" Orthodox, not just by going to Church or praying or reading the Scripture. How's doing all these different from any other Christian denomination?

Why an Earth it should be intentionally different from any other Christian denomination? What's different enought? Changing name to Helpmeet Helena and learning Russian accent

Most of the basic daily religious practices of Christians are the same: prayer, Scripture, corporate worship, etc.  Actually, even the major non-Christian religions share these with us.  There's nothing inherently Orthodox about them because they are ways human beings reach out to God.  You can't say, for example, that Hindus praying before their idols are carrying out an Orthodox devotional practice. 

In Orthodoxy, these basic religious practices will have an Orthodox flavour: the words we pray will be Orthodox, the Scriptures we read will be read with the mind of the Church within the heart of the Church, our fasting and feasting is united to our liturgical calendar, is done with our fellow Orthodox Christians, and to the extent that it allows almsgiving, is done in solidarity with the poor, etc.  A daily Orthodox spiritual practice isn't about the amount of Orthodox paraphernalia one incorporates into one's daily life--those things have their own proper role, and if used wrongly can lead us astray.  It's about building consistent spiritual habits to draw upon God's grace in order, basically, to

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.
     
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« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2013, 01:59:19 AM »

This is theoretically very easy:

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.

Tolstoi did that and got anathematized by the Church.
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« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2013, 08:16:23 AM »

1. Buy a prayer rope and get into the habit of saying "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, the sinner" .The prayer rope is an Orthodox "bracelet" or " necklace" that you can wear all the time. You'll always be reminded that you are an Orthodox. Smiley

I have to strongly disagree with this. Prayer ropes are generally for monks, and most Orthodox people in the world don't walk around with prayer ropes as bracelets. It's totally ridiculous and you'll look like a nut job to most normal culturally Orthodox people. Interior prayer is a deeper thing that you grow into and running around as a new inquirer with a prayer rope is beyond the pale. Laypeople can use prayer ropes at home and with private devotions but literally wearing it on your sleeve in public seems so presumptuous and pretentious at this point that I have to suppress a HUGE eye roll. There are a few non-monks I know that wear these around convincingly but they are some of the most serious spiritual people I know, and they're older and have a very wise demeanor about them, and they are all clergy at some level.

Again, I'm not saying that you can't use a prayer rope, but to advise someone who has just started investigating to buy a prayer rope and start saying the Jesus prayer as a way to remind them that they are Orthodox seems incredibly stupid and juvenile to me. Rant over.

I ALWAYS have a prayer rope with me. I have one in my car, one at work, and one I wear as a bracelet. If you think saying the Jesus prayer (one of the most powerful, easy to memorize, lovely prayers) is a bad thing...that's on you. I love my ropes and I love the Jesus prayer. They calm me down, they keep me focused. And for a person that is not in the habit of praying (pray without ceasing, right?) a prayer rope to "keep the beat" is what helped me. And btw, I grew up in an Orthodox country where prayers rope are very very common.
I don't know where you got the idea that only monks can use it. Anyway...this is so strange. I'm in shock somebody will say prayer ropes are not to be used by laypeople in public. Huh?
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« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2013, 08:28:13 AM »

Prayer ropes are a much discussed topic and there is not a single 'right way'.

So for the benefit of the original poster who probably doesn't need a debate here, she should consult with her priest on the idea of prayer ropes and let that answer be the right one.

But the Jesus prayer, that can be helpful even without the rope, if you don't have any other prayers memorized it works for any ' prayer needed occaision'

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« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2013, 08:28:48 AM »

I believe Jenny was trying to find ways to "be" Orthodox, not just by going to Church or praying or reading the Scripture. How's doing all these different from any other Christian denomination?

Why an Earth it should be intentionally different from any other Christian denomination? What's different enought? Changing name to Helpmeet Helena and learning Russian accent

Examples.
I just got married. The priest placed our rings on our RIGHT hands. And that's where we left them. Different? Oh yes, everybody is asking me about it.

We call our Sunday service the Divine Liturgy. Different? Of course.

As Orthodox, we kneel, prostate, bow, cross a hundred times, kiss icons, venerate saints, pray for dead people.
Should I go on?

We are different. From the way we pray, to the way we worship, to the way we behave....everything is different.



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« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2013, 08:32:46 AM »

Prayer ropes are a much discussed topic and there is not a single 'right way'.

So for the benefit of the original poster who probably doesn't need a debate here, she should consult with her priest on the idea of prayer ropes and let that answer be the right one.

But the Jesus prayer, that can be helpful even without the rope, if you don't have any other prayers memorized it works for any ' prayer needed occaision'



I never knew there's a debate about prayer ropes. Lord, have mercy! This is too strange to me.

But, I agree. It will be to no help to the OP to start a debate here.
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« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2013, 08:41:48 AM »

My friend I see you are in the start. Welcome to the truth!  Grin
I am surprised that you udnerstand that Orthodoxy is a way of living and not just a part of your life. Most beginners as I did thought otherwise.
Just do not rush things. Remmbers taht teh road is eternal. Have aptience. You can't be amde saint in one day.
Have love, faith and hope.
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God is Love.
Ό Θεός ἀγάπη ἐστί.
There is no luck, there is no fate. There are always two ways. One is God's and one is devil's. And in each step of your life you have to pick one, always.
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« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2013, 11:14:18 AM »

We are different. From the way we pray, to the way we worship, to the way we behave....everything is different.

However we are not intentionally trying to be different as you suggested. We just retain our customs.
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« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2013, 11:30:15 AM »

I suggest reading "Making God Real in the Orthodox Christian Home," by Fr. Anthony Coniaris. He talks about the domestic church, and doing things like family prayer before the icon corner and making the sign of the Cross over your children before they go to sleep or leave for school. You can find it on amazon here http://www.amazon.com/Making-Real-Orthodox-Christian-Home/dp/0937032077.
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"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom
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« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2013, 12:16:33 PM »

We are different. From the way we pray, to the way we worship, to the way we behave....everything is different.

However we are not intentionally trying to be different as you suggested. We just retain our customs.

Actually I do. I intentionally pray to Saints, have icons at work, kiss them, cross myself, bow, fast and....yup, you guessed it, wear my prayer rope.
And I intentionally behave like an Orthodox not only at Church and at home, but everywhere I go.

Forgive me if my behavior makes you roll your eyes. This is me. An Orthodox Christian.
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Not posting anymore due to the rudeness on this site.
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« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2013, 02:28:11 PM »

This is theoretically very easy:

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.

Tolstoi did that and got anathematized by the Church.

Jenny, don't read the Bible, and absolutely do NOT do what it says!!

Moderator comment: I believe that  this poster is using humor. To the poster , remember that Jenny is a catechumen and has asked to get a real response that is simple and clear without innuendo or inside jokes please. Thanks Thomas, Convert Issues Forum Moderator
« Last Edit: October 17, 2013, 02:50:51 PM by Thomas » Logged
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« Reply #36 on: October 17, 2013, 04:09:41 PM »

This is theoretically very easy:

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.

Tolstoi did that and got anathematized by the Church.

Jenny, don't read the Bible, and absolutely do NOT do what it says!!

Nope. More like do not write misguided simplifications. Also, do not think you understand the Bible properly just on your own.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2013, 04:10:05 PM by Alpo » Logged
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« Reply #37 on: October 17, 2013, 05:16:27 PM »

I'm sorry, I was not trying to ask for an oversimplified way to "get" Orthodoxy. I know one never stops learning about its intricacies, but I was hoping for *little ways* to get myself in the mindset.

I thank all of you contributed to this thread! You've given me a lot to work with. To be honest, I'm kind of intimidated by the priests at my church. I encountered very few priests (if any) as a Catholic that exuded fatherly dignity and wisdom like the ones where I attend Liturgy. This makes me almost afraid to talk to them. He knows of my family's and my intention of converting, we've been blessed as catechumens, but like I said--I'm kind of afraid of him!

I'm aware that I need to get over that, however!
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« Reply #38 on: October 17, 2013, 05:22:19 PM »

I'm sorry, I was not trying to ask for an oversimplified way to "get" Orthodoxy. I know one never stops learning about its intricacies, but I was hoping for *little ways* to get myself in the mindset.

I thank all of you contributed to this thread! You've given me a lot to work with. To be honest, I'm kind of intimidated by the priests at my church. I encountered very few priests (if any) as a Catholic that exuded fatherly dignity and wisdom like the ones where I attend Liturgy. This makes me almost afraid to talk to them. He knows of my family's and my intention of converting, we've been blessed as catechumens, but like I said--I'm kind of afraid of him!

I'm aware that I need to get over that, however!

Yes, it is awesome how most Orthodox Priests do not cuss or cut jokes, but act like a Priest should. I also converted from Roman Catholicism. If you can look upon the priest as another alter Christus, then it might be easier. One of my priests actually looked like the icon of Christ on the Iconostasis.
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Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
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« Reply #39 on: October 17, 2013, 05:43:02 PM »

This is theoretically very easy:

Open you New Testament, read what it says, and go do it.

Tolstoi did that and got anathematized by the Church.

Jenny, don't read the Bible, and absolutely do NOT do what it says!!

Nope. More like do not write misguided simplifications. Also, do not think you understand the Bible properly just on your own.

My! Old Saint Anthony's gotta be shaking his finger at you!
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« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2013, 12:36:45 AM »

I'm sorry, I was not trying to ask for an oversimplified way to "get" Orthodoxy.

No need to be sorry on your part. I was commenting to Rufus and not to you.  Smiley
« Last Edit: October 18, 2013, 12:37:04 AM by Alpo » Logged
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« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2013, 05:08:41 AM »

Well, it would probably be good to determine what Orthodoxy is as often people, even Orthodox Christians, don't agree about it. This doesn't sound impressive, but it's the truth. Smiley So, Orthodoxy can be a struggle, an existential struggle, a real search for God and our spiritual identity. That doesn't mean that God has not left us all we need through the Orthodox Church. So, what do I personally believe is Orthodox spirituality? The words of Hieroschemamonk Raphael Noica seem to best describe it for me:

Today, spiritual life is confounded with a return to a morality that is uninspiring and insipid. No! Morality is only a first step, a primitive step back towards spiritual life. When you read the New Testament pay attention to how many times the apostles mention the new life in Christ. It is truly a life in The Spirit. Spiritual life goes beyond our primitive, biological life and it is perfect. Life in The Spirit means to enter into the laws of divine life, if we can call them laws, a life that doesn't know corruption, nor limitation, nor suffering -- suffering is a walk towards death, it is a loss -- so, spiritual life does not know any loss and to enter into these elements of eternal life before our biological death is the meaning of spiritual life.  

Source, my blog: http://romanianorthodoxyinenglish.blogspot.ro/2013/09/the-meaning-of-spiritual-life.html



« Last Edit: October 18, 2013, 05:09:33 AM by IoanC » Logged
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